vmlinuz Format

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vmlinuz Format

Postby Sannaj on Tue Jun 03, 2014 5:27 pm

I just found out the the kernel executable /boot/vmlinuz* of Linux Mint is stored in a Windows Executable Format. Now I'm curios. Why is this done? Does it mean the kernel could be booted by an Windows bootloader?
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Re: vmlinuz Format

Postby Mute Ant on Tue Jun 03, 2014 5:55 pm

Mine isn't...
file /boot/vmlinuz-3.13.0-24-generic
/boot/vmlinuz-3.13.0-24-generic: x86 boot sector
...in ze good old days [1980] the OS kernel was its own boot-loader, you just dd'ed it onto 8" floppy :shock: .
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Re: vmlinuz Format

Postby niowluka on Tue Jun 03, 2014 6:11 pm

Linux kernel is just a binary image, string of 0s and 1s. It is not specific to any operating system. Think of it as a binary representation of all your hardware: cpu, graphic card, etc. I have no clue about Windows but I doubt its bootloader would support Linux kernel, and besides, booting kernel on it's own is not enough, you need a shell on top of that (e.g. Mint).
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Re: vmlinuz Format

Postby Sannaj on Sun Jun 15, 2014 4:35 pm

niowluka wrote:Linux kernel is just a binary image, string of 0s and 1s. It is not specific to any operating system. Think of it as a binary representation of all your hardware: cpu, graphic card, etc. I have no clue about Windows but I doubt its bootloader would support Linux kernel, and besides, booting kernel on it's own is not enough, you need a shell on top of that (e.g. Mint).


I was talking about the kernel's Executable Format. This means the structure of the Metadata arount the code etc. The thing is that when I looked in /boot for some reason I've expected the kernel to be in the ELF Format, witch is used for Linux programms these days and is also the prefered Executable Format of GRUB. So I was surprised that they applied PE, witch is used for programms under Windows instead. Obviously this doesn't change the kernel itself in any way, but there must be a reson why they didn't stayed with the most obvious one.
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