how do you get a fresh install without loosing data

Questions about other topics - please check if your question fits better in another category before posting here
Forum rules
Before you post please read this

how do you get a fresh install without loosing data

Postby Medic77 on Fri Mar 23, 2007 1:54 pm

Is there a way to get Linux Mint to be like a fresh install with out loosing say all your music files?
Medic77
Level 1
Level 1
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2007 6:52 pm

Linux Mint is funded by ads and donations.
 

This will help you out later on

Postby pr3@ch3r on Fri Mar 23, 2007 2:23 pm

On most bigger distros like RHE/Fedora you can boot form the cd again and do a 'reinstall' (and since mint is based on ubuntu which is based on debian Im hoping that feature is there somewhere), but if not you should be able to simply 'save' the /home folder in the partitioning phase by choosing NOT to format it. Just leave the partition scheme exactly how you had it. If you do not have a separate /home partition then this is most likely not possible. Here's a suggested partition scheme to help:

(assuming your drive is 120gb or bigger)



100 M /boot ext2(3) sda1 (primary partition) <--- you can use ext2 or ext3

2048 M SWAP ext3 sda2 (primary partition) <---- usually equal to or double the amount of ram you have

4096 M /tmp ext3 sda3 (primary partition)

50 G / ext3 sda4 (extended partition which then makes / sda5)

50 G / ext3 sda5 <----you dont have to make sda5, it will show here after making sda4 an extended partition

All remaining drive space /home ext3 sda6 (extended partition)
All remaining drive space /home ext3 sda7 (extended partition)


The reason the extended partitions are there is because you can actually resize them later on with no problem if your unsure as to how much of what you'll need, but mainly /home is the only one you will actually need to be extended only because you can only have (I believe) 4 primary partitions. If there are any errors here, anyone who catches them please point them out.
You know what the RHCT certification means? I can break a Redhat server faster than you can.
User avatar
pr3@ch3r
Level 1
Level 1
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:10 pm
Location: Houston, Texas

Postby Medic77 on Fri Mar 23, 2007 2:58 pm

Yea i just did the erase hard drive then install thing.

Is there away of setting up something like restore points so when I do screw up I can have it revert back to a certain time?
Medic77
Level 1
Level 1
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2007 6:52 pm

Postby Husse on Sat Mar 24, 2007 8:43 am

Something like the suggestion from pr3@ch3r could be used, take a look in the wiki How to partition. The most important point is to have home on a separate partition.
The solution suggested by pr3@ch3r will however not work. You can have 4 primary partitions or 3 primary and one extended partition in which you can have logical partitions. (The number of primary an logical partitions can be no more than 24) so some of the partitions suggested as extended has to be logical.
If you use a separate home partition you can reinstall with ease without loosing your data.
As for separate boot and tmp partitions I have no opinion if you use them or not
Restore points is a good idea but probably not possible.
For almost ten years now (Linux first this year before then Windows) I have made image files of my entire hard drive, later the important partitions on a daily basis. If things get screwed up you just roll out an image file. But you need a bit af spce to do that. :)
Image
Don't fix it if it ain't broken, don't break it if you can't fix it
Husse
Level 21
Level 21
 
Posts: 19703
Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2007 7:22 am
Location: Near Borås Sweden

Postby sanguinemoon on Sat Mar 24, 2007 3:10 pm

I always keep my data on separate partitions and disks from the OS itself, but I had it set up like that from the beginning. I have what might be a stupid question: why not just back everything that you need on CDs or DVDs and reinstall? With that route, I would suggest setting up separate partitions for your music files in the partitioning tool that comes with the installer. Besides the swap partition, the partition for the OS will probably the smallest one; if you're overly generous with the OS, you can give it 15 gigs.
User avatar
sanguinemoon
Level 2
Level 2
 
Posts: 77
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 5:08 am

Postby Medic77 on Mon Mar 26, 2007 9:48 am

I see how going through the partition manager to create a separate home partition will work I don't doubt that. I'm just kind of lazy and going through the whole format disk thing just seems easyer. I guess the only big thing about going through the whole partitioner is that I have a 20gb hard drive thats dedicated to linux, and I don't plan to keep sensitive files on it. I'm mainly using it to brows the web, check email, show off beryl, edit some images, and listien to music. I was mainly asking about keeping such files like music on the hard drive with out formating because transfering 2.33 gb of music files to a ipod then to linux on usb 1.0 is soo freaken slow. oh well.

next time I have to reinstall Linux Mint I'll go through the partition manager. Thanks for all you'r feedback and what not.
Medic77
Level 1
Level 1
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2007 6:52 pm


Return to Other topics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: textillis and 5 guests