Putting 'home on a separate partition

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Putting 'home on a separate partition

Postby Dwood on Fri Jun 22, 2007 7:21 am

When creating a separate partition for the home folder as explained in the wiki, can you format that partition as NTFS so that I can share it with windows.?

If so would you just replace ext3 with NTFS in the appropriate places or is there something extra you need to do?
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Postby Boo on Fri Jun 22, 2007 8:24 am

I dont even think you can format a filesystem as ntfs in linux.
you would be better off formatting it as ext3 and installing a free ext3 filesystem reader on windows to read the ext3 partition.

see:
http://www.diskinternals.com/linux-reader/

:D
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Re: Putting 'home on a separate partition

Postby scorp123 on Fri Jun 22, 2007 8:36 am

Dwood wrote:When creating a separate partition for the home folder as explained in the wiki, can you format that partition as NTFS
No.

NTFS is a non-documented closed source filesystem by Microsoft for Microsoft operating systems. They regard this as being a "corporate secret" and hence NTFS doesn't work properly under Linux. Use NTFS at your own risk.
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Postby Dwood on Fri Jun 22, 2007 5:35 pm

Doesn't mintDisk or NTFS-Config enable Mint to read/write NTFS?
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Postby scorp123 on Fri Jun 22, 2007 6:02 pm

Dwood wrote:Doesn't mintDisk or NTFS-Config enable Mint to read/write NTFS?
And yet you can't put your /home or any other essential partition there :roll:

:D
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Postby BlahBlah_X on Sat Jun 23, 2007 10:48 am

You might want to try formatting your /home with FAT32. Both linux and windows can read that.
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Postby scorp123 on Sat Jun 23, 2007 12:50 pm

BlahBlah_X wrote:You might want to try formatting your /home with FAT32. Both linux and windows can read that.
That's a dirty dirty hack and you should be experienced enough NOT to suggest such a thing. For one, FAT32 doesn't know zip about Linux file permissions, it fragments and breaks very easily, and all in all it just doesn't make sense.

People should use filesystems that are native to the respective operating system that also offer the right features that the operating system needs. And for Linux that's either Ext2, Ext3, ReiserFS, XFS, or JFS ... but not NTFS or FAT-crap-32 :roll:
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Postby Husse on Sat Jun 23, 2007 5:15 pm

I wouldn't say it the way scorp said it, but I second his opinion.
But - there are occasions when a use of a "non native" file system could be recommended, and that gives some of what Dwood wants. When I started using Mint I set up my Firefox and Thunderbird profiles on a separate NTFS partition (otherwise only used for the Windows swap file) and shared it between Mint and XP
There is a guide in either Mint, Ubuntu or Mozilla support.
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Postby scorp123 on Sat Jun 23, 2007 5:23 pm

Husse wrote: But - there are occasions when a use of a "non native" file system could be recommended
Nothing against that ... you can create a FAT32 partition somewhere and a mount point called e.g. "/mnt/data-exchange" where you mount that ... or you could use an external USB stick or USB harddisk (they're usually pre-formatted with FAT32 anyway when you buy them).

Putting system mount-points such as /home on a non-native partition however is something I can't recommend.
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Postby grinby on Mon Jun 25, 2007 9:14 am

I agree with scorp123. I have a fat32 partition that I share among three linux distros and an XP partition. Each linux distro has its /home on its respective partition, but certain things (Firefox/Opera/Bittorrent downloads, Thunderbird files, music library, qcad drawings, etc.) get automatically directed to the fat32 partition, which I have mounted in /mnt in each distro and whcih is readily accessible to XP.

The result is that I don't need much space on my distro partitions and all of that data is readily available to whatever distro I'm using. The downside is that when I install a new distro, I lose the specific settings in /home that I've generated for the applications I use.

But even this has an upside: I tend to tinker all the time, and about half of the settings I generate are errant efforts to fix problems I've created. A clean install lets me start making a new mess from scratch.
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