debian on tablet[debian users guide]

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debian on tablet[debian users guide]

Postby rufong on Sat Sep 03, 2011 4:31 am

from my fascination with tablets/slates i found this guide posted
on the debian users forum by mikeshepard; HowTo: Squeeze on ASUS T101MT
personally i await either the asus eee slate ep121 being sold in taiwan OR samsung series 7 slate! ;)
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gnome shell on asus b121 tabletpc(my experience)

Postby rufong on Sun Oct 09, 2011 10:06 am

from the link in the previous post; HOWTO: Squeeze on ASUS T101MT
by: confuseling » 2011-06-25 20:51

Incidentally, if anyone's interested, touchscreen support seemed not to work on 2.6.39,
and early 3.0-rcs blanked the display early in the boot and never recovered (though it did boot I reckon... and also, it's distinctly possible that this had nothing to do with the kernel as such, but was merely some other package needing to catch up)

3.0.0-rc4, however, works a treat so far...

so i did debian 6 with 2.6.32-5-amd64 via iso, unetbootin to usb
then squeeze --> wheezy via vbrummond's advice
deb http://ftp.tku.edu.tw/debian testing main contrib non-free
deb-src http://ftp.tku.edu.tw/debian testing main contrib non-free

deb http://security.debian.org/ testing/updates main contrib non-free
deb-src http://security.debian.org/ testing/updates main contrib non-free

deb http://www.debian-multimedia.org testing main non-free


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apt-get update

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apt-get --download-only dist-upgrade

(632 upgraded, 159 new installs, 13 removed, 405Mb additional YIKES! next time i'll start with a 'testing' netinstall)
reboot
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shutdown -r now

choose recovery mode from grub

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apt-get dist-upgrade

reboot again
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shutdown -r now
now ur on testing.
('puter hung after grub, blk screen no cursor/gdm)rebooted again,
now i'm on 3.0.0-1-amd64(unstable for me), installed smxi/inxi and nautilus-dropbox
By: confuseling » 2011-06-29 22:20
No notes, I'm afraid. I just installed the testing netinst, and switched to a mixed testing / sid system as per this thread

Howto: Set up and Maintain a Mixed Testing/Unstable System

(you don't need to read the whole thing - I found the first post covered pretty near everything)

Most important stuff works out of the box. Obviously you have to contend with the vagaries of a development branch,
but testing is surprisingly well put together.

Alternatively, you might prefer to do a stable install and run a backported kernel. RCs won't appear in backports
(I don't think - never used it), but 2.6.38 also has touchscreen support.

Doing it Right: by rickh » 2007-06-02 08:54

Here is the key. We need to let Apt know which is our preferred update repository. That information comes from the /etc/apt/apt.conf file. If it doesn't exist, create it. It needs to include this line:

APT::Default-Release "testing";

With that in place, aptitude will first look at testing, and if it sees the program you have identified, it will look no further. In our scenario, since we know we want our application from Unstable, our command will be:

# aptitude install -t unstable ratpoison

All this is a beautiful thing, but it's not foolproof. At the beginning of the essay, I said, "...you have ... judged yourself capable of managing it." That "managing" is what we will look at next.

Other Considerations

Suppose that Testing is the default release, but the application in which we're interested exists only in Unstable. In that case, Aptitude will happily install it (and its dependencies) without any particular warning. This is further complicated by the fact that those dependencies, along with any programs you chose by name to install, are "marked" by Apt as OK to upgrade from Unstable. From now on (until your Unstable package moves to Testing), those programs will be updated from Sid as the updates become available.

The critical result of that behavior is that it will behoove you to be aware of what programs have been installed from your secondary repositories, so that you can be alert for subsequent upgrades from that repository which can easily happen without your realization. (Note: The best way I have discovered to check exactly what packages are currently installed from unstable is:
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$ apt-show-versions | grep unstable


The next step in preventing such unforeseen updates is "pinning," but that is just beyond the scope of this Howto.

(Insertion: There is quite a bit of discussion in the comments below about the need for an /etc/apt/preferences file, and the "pinning" instructions it contains. I have been watching my own system very closely to see how a package upgrade is handled once you have chosen to upgrade it from Unstable. My considered opinion, at this point, is that /etc/apt/preferences is not necessary, unless you feel that you need absolute control over the source of future upgrades to the package in question.

My observation is that, without pinning, a package installed from Unstable will continue to get upgrades from unstable until it is migrated from Unstable to Testing. Once that happens, aptitude will change it's source for that package back to the default release (Testing). IMO, that's the way you should allow it to work. /Insertion.)

deb http://ftp.tku.edu.tw/debian testing main contrib non-free
deb-src http://ftp.tku.edu.tw/debian testing main contrib non-free

deb http://security.debian.org/ testing/updates main contrib non-free
deb-src http://security.debian.org/ testing/updates main contrib non-free

deb http://www.debian-multimedia.org testing main non-free

# Debian sid FAQ - http://wooledge.org/~greg/sidfaq.html
# There is no security, volatile or backports repo for Unstable Sid
deb http://ftp.tku.edu.tw/debian/ unstable main contrib non-free
deb-src http://http.us.debian.org/debian/ unstable main contrib non-free


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apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade && apt-get install apt-listbugs apt-listchanges

via smxi, added the liquorix kernel sources,
and installed 2.6.38-7-dmz(new users look in; kernel options, add sources, alternative kernels)

WOW!, kinda feel like a ping-pong ball; ubu 11.10b2 >debian 6>testing/unstable >back to ubu 11.10b2
so..back on ubu, after reinstall in order to try gnome shell via 3.2, a comment on this webpage
mcniela; 1 month ago
I'd like to say that I found Gnome3 to be very nice indeed when I played with it in 11.10b.
In my opinion, it is the best linux interface for touchscreens so far (not talking phones aka n900).

got me impatient to wait for gnome3 to move to testing from experimental, and i've no experience with openSuse.
a beautiful theme for gnome shell, icon theme, more themes.
ubuntu does not have inxi/smxi in its repos so;
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cd /usr/local/bin && sudo wget -Nc smxi.org/inxi && sudo chmod +x inxi && inxi

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inxi --recommends
to ensure it can report accurately.

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sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install xinput-calibrator xserver-xorg-input-multitouch

use the calibrator by clicking on the crosshairs with your stylus,
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xinput_calibrator

Warning: multiple calibratable devices found, calibrating last one (Wacom ISDv4 90 Pen eraser)
use --device to select another one.
Calibrating standard Xorg driver "Wacom ISDv4 90 Pen eraser"
current calibration values: min_x=0, max_x=26112 and min_y=0, max_y=16320
If these values are estimated wrong, either supply it manually with the --precalib option, or run the 'get_precalib.sh' script to automatically get it (through HAL).


--> Making the calibration permanent <--
copy the snippet below into '/etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/99-calibration.conf'
Section "InputClass"
Identifier "calibration"
MatchProduct "!!Name_Of_TouchScreen!!"
Option "MinX" "103"
Option "MaxX" "26120"
Option "MinY" "42"
Option "MaxY" "16348"
EndSection

Change '!!Name_Of_TouchScreen!!' to your device's name in the config above.

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xsetwacom list dev

Wacom ISDv4 90 Pen stylus id: 13 type: STYLUS
Wacom ISDv4 90 Pen eraser id: 17 type: ERASER


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xinput_calibrator --device "Wacom ISDv4 90 Pen stylus"

Calibrating standard Xorg driver "Wacom ISDv4 90 Pen stylus"
current calibration values: min_x=0, max_x=26112 and min_y=0, max_y=16320
If these values are estimated wrong, either supply it manually with the --precalib option, or run the 'get_precalib.sh' script to automatically get it (through HAL).


--> Making the calibration permanent <--
copy the snippet below into '/etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/99-calibration.conf'
Section "InputClass"
Identifier "calibration"
MatchProduct "!!Name_Of_TouchScreen!!"
Option "MinX" "92"
Option "MaxX" "26121"
Option "MinY" "111"
Option "MaxY" "16362"
EndSection

Change '!!Name_Of_TouchScreen!!' to your device's name in the config above.

record those four Min/Max values for future use!

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nano /var/log/Xorg.0.log

has interesting info, in my case; (EE) Couldn't init device "eGalax_eMPIA Technology Inc. PCAP MultiTouch Controller"
now i found samiux's blog..
HowTo: Gigabyte TouchNote T1028X with Intel Atom N280 and eGalax touchscreen. runs Ubuntu 10.10 flawlessly except touchscreen, how to overcome this problem.
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lsusb

shows the following;
Bus 005 Device 002: ID 0eef:0001 D-WAV Scientific Co., Ltd eGalax TouchScreen
Step 1 :
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sudo nano /etc/default/grub

modify "GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT" (i8042.noloop=1 solves the touchpad problem).
to this:
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash i8042.noloop=1 usbhid.quirks=0xeef:0x1:0x40"
Save and exit.
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sudo update-grub


Step 2 :
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sudo nano /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf

Append the following to the file.
blacklist usbtouchscreen

Step 3 :

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sudo mkdir /usr/lib/X11/xorg.conf.d

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sudo nano /usr/lib/X11/xorg.conf.d/05-evdev.conf


Append the following to the file.

Section "InputClass"
Identifier "eGalax"
MatchProduct "eGalax"
MatchDevicePath "/dev/input/event*"
Driver "evdev"
Option "SwapAxes" "off"
Option "Calibration" "92 26121 111 16362"
EndSection

The value of calibration is "92 26121 111 16362", my calibration from xinput_calibrator (resolution 1280 x 800).
Change the value to the four Min/Max values you recorded from the calibration.

Step 4 :
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sudo mkdir /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d

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sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/99-calibration.conf

Append the following to the file;

Section "InputClass"
Identifier "calibration"
MatchProduct "Wacom ISDv4 Pen stylus"
Option "MinX" "92"
Option "MaxX" "26121"
Option "MinY" "111"
Option "MaxY" "16362"
EndSection

Change the Min/Max values to the four values you recorded from your calibration.

Step 5 :
Reboot your system.

Step 6 (Optional) :
testing programs;
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sudo apt-get install python-pymt

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python /usr/share/pymt-examples/launcher-multi.py

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python /usr/share/pymt-examples/games/bubblebattles/bubblebatte.py


That's all! See you. ~ samiux


alright, now i'm playing with scripts/gitclones from this ubuntuforums thread..

Further tabletpc setup resources.

a useful website detailing the windows side of the equation..


thx 2 craigevil 4 ur Ultimate Debian Sources List, as well as your timely advice;
1) Use smxi
2) Make sure you have both apt-listbugs and apt-listchanges installed.
3) Follow the debian dev,security, and bug mailing-lists.
4) Do not use Synaptic to upgrade KDE/Gnome/Xorg
5) Pay close attention to what is being upgraded/installed/removed.
6) Be happy and never have to reinstall Debian ever again.
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