32 vs 64 bit

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32 vs 64 bit

Postby tlcmd on Sun Jan 19, 2014 12:11 pm

Assistance, please. This is probably a dumb question, but some advice would be appreciated. I am currently running a dual boot with Windows 7 (with which I am unhappy) and LMDE (Mate) both 32 bit. I have a dual core processor.

My Question: Is thee any advantage to re-installing LMDE as a 64 bit OS and can I do so with the other HDD partition (Windows 7) being 32 bit?

Thanks for advice.
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Re: 32 vs 64 bit

Postby kurotsugi on Sun Jan 19, 2014 12:19 pm

the number of cores doesn't matter. we need to know whether if your CPU have 64 bit support. please run 'inxi -C' and tell us the result.
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Re: 32 vs 64 bit

Postby tlcmd on Sun Jan 19, 2014 12:41 pm

Thanks for the reply: Here's the result:
CPU: Dual core AMD Athlon 64 X2 4800+ (-MCP-) cache 1024 KB flags (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 svm)
Clock Speeds: (1) 2499.849 MHz (2) 2499.849 MHz

And if my cpu "qualifies for 64 bit LMDE, what will i gain??

Thanks,
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Re: 32 vs 64 bit

Postby kurotsugi on Sun Jan 19, 2014 1:25 pm

your CPU is 64 bit compatible. the main benefit will be, you can use ram bigger than 4gb. there are other benefits i.e. your system is slight faster and your apps will performs better. however, these performance gain is very small and you won't notice it. most user choose 64 bit version because they want to use ram bigger than 4gb.

anyway, for your second question, yes. it doesn't matter if your windows is 32 or 64 bit. you can install either 32 or 64 bit of linux.
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Re: 32 vs 64 bit

Postby baldrick.777 on Mon Feb 24, 2014 12:43 am

This interests me. How can you tell if something is 64bit capable by using lixi -C?

Is it the clock speeds, or amount of clocks?

For example, mine looks like this...
Code: Select all
baldrick@baldrick ~ $ inxi -C
CPU:       Dual core Intel Core2 Duo CPU T5750 (-MCP-) cache: 2048 KB flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 ssse3)
           Clock Speeds: 1: 1000.00 MHz 2: 1000.00 MHz

But I aways imagined it is a 32bit machine?

Cheers.
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Re: 32 vs 64 bit

Postby kurotsugi on Mon Feb 24, 2014 1:01 am

I use the database from a certain site. here's your's http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_2/In ... 0412M.html your CPU have 64 bit support.
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Re: 32 vs 64 bit

Postby baldrick.777 on Mon Feb 24, 2014 4:33 am

kurotsugi wrote:I use the database from a certain site. here's your's http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_2/In ... 0412M.html your CPU have 64 bit support.


Thanks! And I've been using 32bit all this time. Go figure.
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Re: 32 vs 64 bit

Postby kurotsugi on Mon Feb 24, 2014 1:02 pm

32bit OS without PAE only support ram up to 4 GB. if you have a cpu with 64 bit support and ram bigger than 4 gb it might a better idea to install the 64 bit version.
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Re: 32 vs 64 bit

Postby DrHu on Mon Feb 24, 2014 1:41 pm

The main distinction is RAM, anything above 4GB RAM can possibly benefit from using a 64bit version of Linux..
--just be aware that all 64bit versions of a system or application are twice the memory footprint of the 32bit version, the advantage is better RAM/memory management..

Probably few are going to need enterprise size data repositories, as in humongous hard drives/storage systems and so wouldn't benefit much from larger address spaces (bit sizes)..
--you might not need this, but compiles(from source code) are faster with a 64bit os: most desktop Linux users wont/
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Re: 32 vs 64 bit

Postby kurotsugi on Mon Feb 24, 2014 2:10 pm

The main distinction is RAM, anything above 4GB RAM can possibly benefit from using a 64bit version of Linux..
--just be aware that all 64bit versions of a system or application are twice the memory footprint of the 32bit version, the advantage is better RAM/memory management..

It definetely not true. 64 bit version indeed have bigger memory footprint but the differences is small. in my experience the difference between them is less than 10%. the memory management on both version are same.
Probably few are going to need enterprise size data repositories, as in humongous hard drives/storage systems and so wouldn't benefit much from larger address spaces (bit sizes)..
--you might not need this, but compiles(from source code) are faster with a 64bit os: most desktop Linux users wont/

I can't understand why the bit size is affecting the repositories as it's not related with storage system. 64bit version of an app is bigger than it's 32bit counterpart but their differences is quite small. the compiling time also almost same.
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Re: 32 vs 64 bit

Postby srs5694 on Mon Feb 24, 2014 6:25 pm

kurotsugi wrote:
The main distinction is RAM, anything above 4GB RAM can possibly benefit from using a 64bit version of Linux..
--just be aware that all 64bit versions of a system or application are twice the memory footprint of the 32bit version, the advantage is better RAM/memory management..

It definetely not true. 64 bit version indeed have bigger memory footprint but the differences is small. in my experience the difference between them is less than 10%. the memory management on both version are same.


Indeed. Binaries themselves differ a bit in size, but not all that much. For instance, the 32-bit version of my rEFInd boot manager is 137KiB, whereas the 64-bit version is 175KiB -- a 28% increase in size. (These are EFI binaries, not Linux binaries. I chose them for comparison because I had both binaries handy in unpackaged form.) Once a binary is loaded and running, though, factors other than the raw code size can come into play. A word processor will load a document into memory; a multimedia player will buffer part of the video stream in memory; and so on. Most of this working data does not consist of pointers, and so won't consume any more memory on a 64-bit installation than on a 32-bit installation.

Probably few are going to need enterprise size data repositories, as in humongous hard drives/storage systems and so wouldn't benefit much from larger address spaces (bit sizes)..
--you might not need this, but compiles(from source code) are faster with a 64bit os: most desktop Linux users wont/

I can't understand why the bit size is affecting the repositories as it's not related with storage system. 64bit version of an app is bigger than it's 32bit counterpart but their differences is quite small. the compiling time also almost same.[/quote]

I did some benchmarks a long, long time ago -- see this writeup for Linux Magazine. In that benchmark, there was a whopping 2% speed improvement for compiling code under a 64-bit distribution. That said, it's conceivable that things have changed today. The real performance differences come in code that does heavy integer operations -- things like cryptographic hashing of big files or compressing/decompressing data. The biggest improvement in my test from many moons ago was oggenc, which saw a 30% speed improvement. 10-15% was more typical, though.

Overall, my opinion is that it rarely makes sense to install a 32-bit OS on a 64-bit computer these days. The memory-consumption advantages of 32-bit code are often overplayed, IMHO. It used to be that there were some notable programs that weren't available in 64-bit form, but such examples are very rare today -- and in most cases, it's possible to run them using 32-bit libraries on a 64-bit system. (That, though, will have a notable memory impact, especially if it's a program that relies on many complex libraries.)
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Re: 32 vs 64 bit

Postby mike acker on Tue Feb 25, 2014 2:44 pm

most likely the 32 bit code will be joining the 16 bit code in the dust bin.
to me that's the main reason for running 64bit.
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Re: 32 vs 64 bit

Postby MadmanRB on Wed Mar 05, 2014 11:59 am

mike acker wrote:most likely the 32 bit code will be joining the 16 bit code in the dust bin.
to me that's the main reason for running 64bit.


Eh hard to say if this will be true right now though, 32bit still has viability.
Though we have to try to fix that year 2038 bug
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