On oxygen in /usr/share/icons [Solved]

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On oxygen in /usr/share/icons [Solved]

Postby AlanWalker on Thu May 08, 2014 4:31 pm

While in /usr/share/icons I entered the command du -sh and had the following output:

1.9M Adwaita
4.0K cab_extract.png
4.0K cab_view.png
4.0K default
0 default.kde4
1.8M DMZ-Black
1.8M DMZ-White
120M gnome
156K handhelds
53M hicolor
108K HighContrast
276K locolor
68M Mint-X
1.1M Mint-X-Dark
186M oxygen
1.7M redglass
2.2M whiteglass
8.0K xchat.xpm

The directory "oxygen" is surprising large (186 Meg).

As I want to trim the size of system backup tarballs I'd like to ask : How does the system use what's in that directory? Can one do without it? If so can one use rm oxygen do that without ramifications elsewhere?

TIA
Last edited by AlanWalker on Thu May 08, 2014 8:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: On oxygen in /usr/share/icons

Postby xenopeek on Thu May 08, 2014 4:49 pm

First, don't ever delete files in system folders by hand! Your package manager has installed these files there, and if you delete them you start on the path to completely ruining your system as the package manager will think dependencies of programs you have installed as satisfied while you yourself intentionally broke your system by deleting files from system directories--potentially removing files that are needed by programs you have installed, without your package manager being able to warn you about that...

This folder is probably for KDE's oxygen theme. If you're not happy with KDE, use another desktop environment.

The sane way to go about this is to figure out from what package the files you want to remove have been installed, and then use your package manager of choice to remove that package. Your package manager will remove any programs that need those files, so you avoid breaking your system. Though be sure you take a very careful look at what all your package manager will remove as a consequence of you removing a package--as people here have managed to completely destroy their installation by blindly clicking "ok, yeah whatever, next!" upon deleting critical system packages that had the effect of removing most of their installation.

Consider whether a measly few megabytes are worth that if you aren't comfortable using package managers.

Anyway, you can probably find what package installed the files there with this command:
Code: Select all
dpkg -S /usr/share/icons/oxygen
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Re: On oxygen in /usr/share/icons

Postby AlanWalker on Thu May 08, 2014 6:57 pm

xenopeek wrote:First, don't ever delete files in system folders by hand! Your package manager has installed these files there, and if you delete them you start on the path to completely ruining your system as the package manager will think dependencies of programs you have installed as satisfied while you yourself intentionally broke your system by deleting files from system directories--potentially removing files that are needed by programs you have installed, without your package manager being able to warn you about that...

I've been careful, but now I'll be more careful.

Twice now in the last 10 days I've had to restored my system (using Mint's repair shell and a tar archive) - both times due to installing deb files hoping to fix a docking station not showing in nemo (I really like tar; I was able to restore my system today from a "/" tarball 5 or so days old while preserving today's /home).

I am developing an adverse gut reaction to dpkg -i *.deb (the vehicle to me trashing my system twice), but I do believe that I'll get better at using dpkg.

xenopeek wrote:This folder is probably for KDE's oxygen theme. If you're not happy with KDE, use another desktop environment.

Odd. I'm using Cinnamon and I was under the impression that LMDE Cinnamon was using Gnome.

xenopeek wrote:The sane way to go about this is to figure out from what package the files you want to remove have been installed, and then use your package manager of choice to remove that package. Your package manager will remove any programs that need those files, so you avoid breaking your system. Though be sure you take a very careful look at what all your package manager will remove as a consequence of you removing a package--as people here have managed to completely destroy their installation by blindly clicking "ok, yeah whatever, next!" upon deleting critical system packages that had the effect of removing most of their installation.

"Sane"... er, is that a requirement? :(

I'd not thought of using a package manager to investigate the history and dependencies of existing files; I am trying to stay with apt and the Synaptic Package Manager as I seem to remember from earlier days with Mint that different management tools maintain different records, but even there I didn't think of using a manager to investigate a file I found somewhere off root.

Did I mention that I like tarballs of "/" ? :D

xenopeek wrote:Consider whether a measly few megabytes are worth that if you aren't comfortable using package managers.

Careful use of resources... Its an old habit.

xenopeek wrote:Anyway, you can probably find what package installed the files there with this command:
Code: Select all
dpkg -S /usr/share/icons/oxygen

I looked... My system responded oxygen-icon-theme, kate-data: /usr/share/icons/oxygen.

Thank you for your reply.
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