In the future...

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Re: In the future...

Postby optimize me on Wed Aug 05, 2009 6:32 pm

vrkalak wrote:Look how far computer technology has come in the last few years.

Actually, I think the last few years have been kind of a drag. In the mid 90s, if you had a 3 to 500MHz PII, you were king of the hill. '99 rolled around and PIII's were all the rage. I remember my first computer with a 800MHz PIII and how absolutely f'n amazed I was at how fast it ran Windows 98. PIII's only ever went as fast as (I think) 1.4 or 1.5GHz, but they were produced until 2003. P4's hit the market in 2000 and stopped being produced last year. As far as I know, a production P4 (i.e., not modded or overclocked) never went as fast as 4GHz.

These days, all the rage is in slapping multiple cores into a single processor. That's all well and good, but why haven't speeds improved any for the last four or five years? As far as I know, production processors still haven't gone much past 4GHz. Unless everybody is saving up to drop the super-speed, 10GHz, 128bit processors on us for the Christmas season this year, I don't see a whole lot changing in the next year or two given current trends. (That's obviously excluding any breakthroughs in quantum computing, alien visitors giving us advanced technology, etc..)

I talk Pentium because it's all I really know. I never had a computer with an AMD chipset in it, and I don't really know of any other vendors - AMD & Intel are the big dogs in the marketplace. If somebody knows a faster (non-modded) chip, I'd definitely like to hear about it.
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Re: In the future...

Postby linuxviolin on Wed Aug 05, 2009 8:31 pm

vrkalak wrote:My home PC has a Terabyte of memory ...

I'm sorry but it's stupid! I wonder what you can do with your home PC to be in a REAL NEED of "a Terabyte of memory"... :roll:

vrkalak wrote:I will be interesting to see, that's all.

I would rather say that it will be sad...
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Re: In the future...

Postby Femacamper on Fri Aug 21, 2009 10:27 pm

Are we going to be seeing a Universal X64 edition? I would really like support for the latest technology, especially since I'm thinking of an upgrade (perhaps to an Intel I7 with 6 or 12 gig of RAM). I need the memory support, but also I would like to break in a lot of the new 64-bit software. I prefer using free software as much as possible, which is why I like the Universal edition. Which begs the question: do you guys completely remove binary blobs out of the kernel, or is that included? How "free" is the Universal edition, really?

As a side note, what would be involved in getting bigmem support for regular 32-mint?
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Re: In the future...

Postby vrkalak on Fri Aug 21, 2009 11:14 pm

"Linuxviolin wrote:
I'm sorry but it's stupid! I wonder what you can do with your home PC to be in a REAL NEED of "a Terabyte of memory"... :roll:


I am a Registered Architect using AutoCAD for Linux.
I design and do renderings of buildings; ie: floorplans, structural plans and 3-D renderings.
I can show the client a 3-D walk-through, of a finished building, in vector concept.

This takes up a lot of hard-drive memory, as well as, RAM during the design phase. A Tera-byte goes fast.
I also, have 2 external hard-drives of 500 Gb each.
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Re: In the future...

Postby emorrp1 on Sat Aug 22, 2009 3:49 am

Femacamper wrote:I prefer using free software as much as possible, which is why I like the Universal edition. Which begs the question: do you guys completely remove binary blobs out of the kernel, or is that included? How "free" is the Universal edition, really?


I'm fairly sure there are no binary blobs in the kernel until (and unless) you put them there. Proprietary graphics card drivers for instance are not downloaded and installed until you enable them in jockey. Mint universal is as Free as Ubuntu I believe.

http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php wrote:This edition aims to provide the same features as the Main Edition without including proprietary software, patented technologies or support for restricted formats. If you're a magazine, a reseller or a distributor in Japan or in the USA then choose this edition.
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Re: In the future...

Postby linuxviolin on Sat Aug 22, 2009 9:14 am

vrkalak wrote:I am a Registered Architect using AutoCAD for Linux.
I design and do renderings of buildings; ie: floorplans, structural plans and 3-D renderings.
I can show the client a 3-D walk-through, of a finished building, in vector concept.

This takes up a lot of hard-drive memory, as well as, RAM during the design phase. A Tera-byte goes fast.
I also, have 2 external hard-drives of 500 Gb each.

OK, let's say you have specific needs because your work but I talked about just a home user. But even... ok I stop here, it's not the place for a debate about this here. ;-)

emorrp1 wrote: Mint universal is as Free as Ubuntu I believe

Yes but as Ubuntu has several/some not free components... Femacamper, if you really want something completely free you should use a distro like gNewSense:

A product sponsored by the Free Software Foundation, gNewSense is an Ubuntu-based Linux distribution released without any proprietary and non-free components, and several enhancements. Notably, all proprietary firmware, restricted modules and Ubuntu logos are removed, while the "Universe" repository is enabled by default and several GNU applications, such as Emacs and development libraries, as well as bsdgames and NetHack, are included in the default installation. The goal of the project is to produce a totally free (libre) Linux distribution.

(Distrowatch)

Neither Debian nor Ubuntu are fully free. Ubuntu installs non-free software by default. Debian provides non-free software through its repositories and includes non-free kernel drivers.

(from the gNewSense website)
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Re: In the future...

Postby Femacamper on Sun Aug 23, 2009 12:03 am

emorrp1 wrote:I'm fairly sure there are no binary blobs in the kernel until (and unless) you put them there. Proprietary graphics card drivers for instance are not downloaded and installed until you enable them in jockey. Mint universal is as Free as Ubuntu I believe.


That's just the enabling software. It still has blobs in the kernel for several things (including ATI, Intel and NVIDIA) if it is using the Ubuntu-patched kernel, which I assume Mint does. (Am I wrong?)

linuxviolin wrote:Yes but as Ubuntu has several/some not free components... Femacamper, if you really want something completely free you should use a distro like gNewSense:


Yes, I've tried distros like gNewSense, but they come short in the functionality and especially, the UI.

Maybe I could just install the free Mint packages on one of those distros? Would that require a distro-upgrade to a more recent version of Ubuntu, do you figure?
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Re: In the future...

Postby emorrp1 on Sun Aug 23, 2009 3:23 am

Ok, fair enough, afaik Mint does not modify the kernel. You could indeed install the mintTools etc. on top of any distribution, but that wouldn't exactly be Mint anymore. If you want to do that then I recommend getting the code directly from github (or the Helena alpha repo), as the latest versions are much more independent of each other, ready for Helena, but also making it easier to install on other distros. Oh and it'd be easier to install on a debian-based distro than one that uses rpms, but either way it's just python, so they don't need compiling or anything.
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Re: In the future...

Postby linuxviolin on Sun Aug 23, 2009 11:56 am

Femacamper wrote:Yes, I've tried distros like gNewSense, but they come short in the functionality and especially, the UI.

Well, of course you must make compromises. If you use a "free" distro like gNewSense you lose some functionnality... It's a choice!

Femacamper wrote:Maybe I could just install the free Mint packages on one of those distros? Would that require a distro-upgrade to a more recent version of Ubuntu, do you figure?

gNewSense is based on Ubuntu, less the proprietary stuff, and Mint also, so you should be able to install the Mint tools as you want.
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Re: In the future...

Postby haruspexed on Tue Sep 01, 2009 6:30 pm

i dont know whats the problem with skype in 64bit is?

using it every day with mint 7 x64... same with all my other apps (firefox, songbird, pidgin, oo, ...)

i have not seen 1 app that has no 64bit version out there i miss...

adobeflashplugin in 64bit is crap like it is in 32bit. i dont need to commit security suicide with installing adobe software.

fact is, software should be optimized not for 1 cpu, it should be optimized for multiple cpu.
most software doesnt need > 8gb ram (maybe my boinc client...)

64 bit is no future, it is present, but i am fine with the situation like it is now, 32 before 64, just if the 64bit version will be optimized!

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Re: In the future...

Postby linuxviolin on Fri Dec 11, 2009 8:30 am

I come back here. For some "fools" (do not take it badly, it's a joke) who are desperate to 64 bit and for some additional information you can read the last Distrowatch Weekly at http://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?issue=20091207#qa

32-bit versus 64-bit computing

Shave-and-a-haircut, two bits asks: I'm considering going from 32-bit to 64-bit but I'm worried about driver availability, codecs and browser plugins. Should I be? Also, is there really a big performance benefit?

DistroWatch answers: When looking at the difference between 32-bit and 64-bit flavors of the x86 architecture, x86_64 is really more of an extension to the previous 32-bit processors than a separate system. For all practical purposes, it's backward compatible. This is good because it means if you've purchased a 64-bit machine, you can choose whether to run a 32-bit or 64-bit operating system on your hardware.

The main benefit of running a 64-bit operating system is that it allows applications to access more memory. If you have an application which would like to access more than 4 GB of RAM, then a 64-bit system is for you. Some operations, such as heavy number crunching may also be slightly faster. On the other hand, there are some drawbacks to 64-bit systems. The pointers in 64-bit code take up more space, causing 64-bit executable files to be larger than the 32-bit variants. Larger executables mean programs may take longer loading.

Problems with codecs and plugins are pretty much a thing of the past. Most organizations have developed 64-bit flavors of their software and the large distributions have made a lot of progress over the years making sure things work smoothly. So there aren't really any barriers preventing someone from making the switch. However, for most Linux desktop users there isn't really any reason to move to 64-bit, yet. You're unlikely to find any Linux applications which need that much memory and I have yet to see any noticeable performance improvement when running a desktop on a 64-bit operating system.

Finally, I'd recommend taking a look at your distribution's forum. There may be a section specifically for people using 64-bit systems. Reading through these posts, or asking some questions about migrating, will give you a better idea if moving to the 64-bit version of your distribution will be worth it for you.

:D
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Re: In the future...

Postby hinto on Fri Dec 11, 2009 8:59 am

In my case, I needed 64 bit for development purposes.
Sure with PAE, you can access more than 4 gigs of ram, etc, but as a C developer, dereferencing int* make a difference.
That's reason I made the leap;)
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