How to install with manual partitioning

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Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby MadPigeon on Fri Jul 05, 2013 9:58 am

Howdy!
I have a question, which have many answers around the net, but none od them was enough precise (and trustworthy).

Does 2 GB PC / laptop needs a /swap partition? From what i've heard it is "reasonable" to have it, but it's not crucial. Personally I've gave my 2 GB laptop 512 MB for /swap, but i am looking for some kind of "recommendation" of how much space to provide for each RAM specification.

Thanks!
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Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby ej64 on Fri Jul 05, 2013 10:28 am

Does 2 GB PC / laptop needs a /swap partition?

If you don't have /swap you can't hibernate (or needs some effort => e.g. tuxonice). Usually you choose a swap partition at least the size of your RAM.
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Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby ej64 on Fri Jul 05, 2013 10:37 am

Brahim wrote:Do I need the /home partition? If so how much space should I give it?

It's more convenient. If you reinstall you don't have to backup and restore (recommended anyway), you just point the new /home to the old partition (or logical volume if you use lvm) and tell the installer to NOT FORMAT it.
Another advantage can be to assign different mount options, e.g. noexec for /home to harden your system.
There are lots of other reasons.

Good reading:
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Partitioning
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Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby anass on Thu Aug 08, 2013 4:04 pm

Thanks a lot for this very useful information. This really open my mind. Thanks again.
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Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby eds on Fri Aug 16, 2013 8:21 am

This is a great step by step with good explanations! :D

So to summarise, we need to create at least 2 partitions,"/" (set up as primary) and swap (set up as logical), in order to properly install and run mint? Does this apply to all linux installations or just mint (sorry noob question)? I tried to do this on a macbook, and if I may ask, where do I install the bootloader?

Also, going a little bit deeper here, I've been reading about this manual partitioning on other systems (for educational purposes, hoping to gain some insight), does mint automatically set the boot flag to the / partition?
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Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby grizebaard on Sun Oct 13, 2013 7:04 pm

Being a neo-newbie at Linux (was an ordinary Unix user many moons ago when the terminal window wasn't a window!), and preparing to attempt a sensible first install, I want to create a separate top-level "/data" partition for use as a distinct sub-tree for all user files, but what's not clear to me from the previous postings what the implications for system operation may be if the partition is not set to /home or some other expected system-embedded directory like /mnt/disk2 or whatever. I really want to keep all app. configuration stuff (hidden or not) happily tucked away in the system tree, but if possible also avoid apps defaulting to leaving user files there as well (à la the painful "Documents and Settings" in Windows), but instead somewhere convenient in the /data subtree. Is this impossible or just a matter of setting the right environment variable(s) afterwards...?

(Oh, and the "/data" partition mounted automatically on boot... )
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Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby xenopeek on Mon Oct 14, 2013 3:46 am

You can create a partition during installation and set its mount point to /data. That will work fine. If you intend to use it for one user only, chown /data to that user after installation (as /data will be owned by root by default). If you intend to use it for multiple users you could chmod 1777 /data, to make it similar to /tmp where all users can write files.

Programs will normally offer to save new files in your configured user directories (~/Documents, ~/Downloads, ~/Pictures, etc.). You can browse to /data to save there of course, and set a bookmark in your file browser to make that easier. You can also remove the ~/Documents directory for example, create it on /data, and then create a link called Documents from your home directory to /data/Documents so that files written to ~/Documents will be stored on /data/Documents. You can also edit the ~/.config/user-dirs.dirs file and update where your user directories are. if you log in with different languages from time to time, I recommend against that though. There have been users with problems because of misconfiguration in this file.
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Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby grizebaard on Mon Oct 14, 2013 10:44 pm

Much obliged for your response, xenopeek. Re: partitioning, that's just the info and reassurance I needed. (As to organising where apps expect to find stuff, clearly I'm going to have to guddle about with that post-install, =laugh= but that's beyond the scope of this topic...!)
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Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby graybeard on Mon Feb 17, 2014 11:51 am

Xenopeek - finally thanks to your tutorial i have partitioned the new petra cinnamon. I have been using mint since Bea, but have always had to do a total install. It was my understanding that having the partitioned home folder that all settings would be saved etc.. Now I find out that it doesn't. I just did s re-instatll this AM but then read abut the data partition which I am lost on - esp. since my wife is a secondary user. Argh!!!! I wish someone would fix linux to do as Mac does when installing an newer version of their OS. Everything is there and no issues have ever been encountered. Thank you. At least i got it this far - FINALLY!
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Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby austin.texas on Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:46 pm

graybeard wrote: It was my understanding that having the partitioned home folder that all settings would be saved etc..

You can configure it either way. You can have /home on a separate partition where your settings will be preserved, or you can have a separate /data partition with the settings on the / partition. They will then not be preserved when you install a new version of Mint to that / partition. It is your choice - however you want to do it.
If you use the Mint installation program to set up a separate /home, the user settings will be there and not on the / partition.
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Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby graybeard on Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:48 pm

I set up the /home so maybe I am good.
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Re: Complex mixed install

Postby zolar1 on Sat Mar 08, 2014 10:23 pm

I have an SSD and a platter drive.

I plan on dual booting mint 13 and win7.

I expect to put mint 13 and win7 on the ssd, but want to put /tmp and /var/tmp on the platter drive as well as windows tmp and pagefie on the platter drive.

Win7 will probably need about 100GB and the remaining 400gb for mint on the ssd.

The platter drive is also 500GB.

What is the best use of the platter drive? I can put long term storage on that too (movies and such).

Best sizes for the platter drive is needed AND what files systems should I choose for all the linux stuff on ecach drive??
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