Running at run-level 2, but 2 is non-networking?

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Running at run-level 2, but 2 is non-networking?

Postby ChickenLittle on Tue Feb 12, 2013 3:21 am

Hi all,

I'm new to Linux. Most of my Unix experience is with OS-X where I have launchd... so...

I was learning about run levels (so I know where to put things!) and found that my default installation is running at run-level 2... but it launched with the full Mate GUI and everything. In addition, the rc2.d directory contains bind9 and openvpn (but not dhcp?)... And 2 is supposed to be Multi-User Mode without Networking.

Can somebody explain this please?

Also: why is dhcp being run at boot when it's not in the rc2.d directory?

Thanks,

-Christopher
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Re: Running at run-level 2, but 2 is non-networking?

Postby viking777 on Tue Feb 12, 2013 5:43 am

And 2 is supposed to be Multi-User Mode without Networking.


In debian etc it is but not in Mint/Ubuntu run level 2 is the normal level it doesn't use 3,4 or 5 (in actual fact 2,3,4,5 are all the same).

It's to do with Upstart - you could read about that if you like :)
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Re: Running at run-level 2, but 2 is non-networking?

Postby ChickenLittle on Tue Feb 12, 2013 6:54 pm

Thanks for your reply.

Where do I find the configuration for upstart jobs (or, tasks? services?)? I know that something is causing the dhcp server to start, but I don't know what.
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Re: Running at run-level 2, but 2 is non-networking?

Postby viking777 on Wed Feb 13, 2013 5:23 am

To tell which system is starting a service (systemv or upstart - mint uses both) you run this command and the answer will be immediately obvious.

Code: Select all
ls -l /etc/init.d


If it is an upstart service that you have a problem with then you have to either rename its conf file which will prevent it from starting ( /etc/init/xxxxxx.conf - where xxxxxx is the name of the service) or alter its content which will alter the run levels in which it starts/stops. Things are much easier if it is still a systemv service because you can install and use sysv-rc-conf to manage those very easily.

However, on my mint system there is no dhcp service running at any time - there is a dhclient service running and that is a child process of Network Manager. In other words, in order to kill that service I would need to prevent Network Manager from starting (a very bad idea) or mess around with the code for the Network Manager service (in my case, another bad idea because I would probably get it wrong and end up with no internet).
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