How do we determine when we get the newer kernels?

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How do we determine when we get the newer kernels?

Postby Orbmiser on Sat Aug 17, 2013 1:53 pm

Posted below in KDE forums first but applies to all distro's I guess.
And I'm still confused about When newer kernels?

How do we determine when we get the newer kernels?
KDE roadmap?

As went from 4.9.5 then 4.10.5 and it just updated last night to 4.11
So when do we get newer kernels? I ask because last 6 months been seeing 3.7,3.8 now 3.10,3.11 and we are still at 3.5.0-36

So how does the KDE group determine when to upgrade the kernel versions?
And how do we backport as I have Backported packages checked but still not getting newer kernels?

Are there Kernel upgrades changelogs of kernels that are not in geek-speek that can be understood by mere humans who are considering if there is a need in upgrading the kernel to resolve issues or get better experience. I have been a computer technician for 30 years and still don't understand most of the kernel changes as


iwlegacy: fix rate control regression
rt2800: fix RT5390 & RT3290 TX power settings regression ( I know what this is but most would not)
Stephane Eranian (1):
perf: Disable monitoring on setuid processes for regular users
Sujith Manoharan (1):
ath9k_htc: Handle IDLE state transition properly

Means little to regular user's and no way knowing if a kernel upgrade would resolve their issues better performance or not.
Any info or Insights directions,etc... Would be greatly appreciated.
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Re: How do we determine when we get the newer kernels?

Postby xenopeek on Sat Aug 17, 2013 3:05 pm

Kernel versions have nothing to do with KDE. Kernels on Linux Mint Main Edition come from the Ubuntu kernel team, though they are by default not automatically upgraded unless you enable level 4 and 5 upgrades in Update Manager's preferences. Some reasoning as to why Linux Mint doesn't upgrade your kernel by default: viewtopic.php?f=47&t=104447#p590569. Ubuntu also supports installing newer mainline kernels, which you can install manually as described there.

Kernel Newbies website keeps a human readable changelog. For the latest kernel (3.10 at the time of this post), that is http://kernelnewbies.org/LinuxChanges. But you can also look up the same information for past version here http://kernelnewbies.org/LinuxVersions if you aren't going to use the latest kernel.
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Re: How do we determine when we get the newer kernels?

Postby Orbmiser on Sat Aug 17, 2013 3:31 pm

Outstanding as usual from you Xenopeek.
I know that kernel upgrades are not specific to KDE just wondering when they decide to use a new kernel version.
As find it confusing Distro versions and when new kernel are upgraded for a particular distro.
Thanks for the links will read as like to learn new things I didn't know before.

Guess my confusion on kernel versions is all the talk of newer versions vs. stable.
And not knowing when a particular distro specifically upgrades their kernel.
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Re: How do we determine when we get the newer kernels?

Postby xenopeek on Sat Aug 17, 2013 4:06 pm

Well, it's the distro developers that combine a KDE version with a kernel version. The kernel developers have a few good resources also for understanding the kernel release better:
https://www.kernel.org/category/releases.html
https://www.kernel.org/category/faq.html

So basically every two to three months a new mainline kernel is released. After a mainline kernel is released, it's considered stable. While the next mainline kernel is in development, any security fixes done for that mainline kernel are backported to the stable kernel. Once the next mainline kernel in development is released, it in turn is considered stable and the old stable ceases to get backports and has reached end of life (so generally after 2-3 months of release). Some kernels are longterm, as noted on the first link above, and receive backports of security fixes for a longer period.

How does that fit with the Ubuntu kernel team? Well, as far as I understand it the Ubuntu kernel team steps in to support stable kernels for longer than 2-3 months. At least for the Ubuntu LTS releases. Of course what they also do is test new kernel releases with Ubuntu and make sure it works optimally with Ubuntu.

These kind of questions get me motived to do some more reading and complete my understanding of it also :D
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