User Accounts

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User Accounts

Postby mokmeister on Tue Apr 08, 2008 2:57 am

Hi All,

I've just installed Linux Mint KDE, and it looks pretty good. I'm trying to set it with four user names, my own, my wife's and the two kids. I want to make their accounts passwordless and lock them down so that they can't make any changes. I would like to be able to go into their accounts and make any changes necessary.

I thought it would be handy enough, goto KDE Control centre, sys admin and login manager, convenience and change settings there, but I still keep getting asked for passwords. Does anybody know how I can achieve what I want to do or is this some kind of system setting? Will I need to reenable root?

Thanks for any advice,

M
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Re: User Accounts

Postby cmost on Tue Apr 08, 2008 6:34 am

Linux is much more secure than Windows by default. Removing passwords kind of defeats your purpose. I believe one of the reason Windows has become a cesspool of malware and other nuisances over the years is because users can't be bothered with basic security measures that are designed to protect them. A user account password is your first line of defense against hackers; I can't imagine it's that big of an inconvenience for your family members to enter a few characters for a password in order to use the computer. Nevertheless, it's your computer and you can do what you want. Log into Mint as a root (or use sudo privileges;) open the /etc/shadow file. Erase the password by deleting the MD5 hash next to each user entry for whom you wish to eliminate the burden of a password and then save the file. A similar procedure can be used to eliminate root's password too, but nobody is that fool hearty. Of course, once you lock down the individual accounts, your users will be asked for a root password if they try to do anything for which administrative level access is needed.
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