PyPM

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PyPM

Postby RBR on Wed Apr 10, 2013 3:06 pm

I am new to Linux and want to install pycollada, using the python package manager PyPM.

But the pypm command is not recognised in the terminal, and the mint software manager does not know pycollada nor PyPM.

Does anyone know how to do this?

Thanks!
Last edited by RBR on Sat Jun 29, 2013 5:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: PyPM

Postby overthetop on Wed Apr 10, 2013 3:15 pm

See http://pycollada.github.io/install.html. (see the instructions for Ubuntu)
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Re: PyPM

Postby mockturtl on Wed Apr 10, 2013 5:00 pm

PyPM is part of the commercial "ActivePython" implementation. You don't need it on Linux; python 2.7 and 3.2 are preinstalled.

(The whole story of installing is different on Linux. You don't browse the web and download programs; 95% of all the software you want is available in the distro's "repository." You install these "packages" through the Software Manager, or the command line. You get automatic updates for everything.)

http://packages.linuxmint.com/
http://packages.ubuntu.com/

Similarly, the python ecosystem consists of a package repository, "PyPI." You get these modules with the `pip` command. (`easy_install` is an alternative to pip.)

The line between the two is not so clear; some code is "OS stuff" to me (my system depends on this language!), but "language stuff" to you (my code should run in any OS!). And maybe you need different versions for different projects. So there's a bit of an art to keeping all your pythons wrangled.

Code: Select all
$ apt install python-pip                                # `apt` is Mint's install command
$ apt install python-lxml python-numpy python-dateutil  # pycollada depends on some libraries
$ sudo pip install pycollada                            # need the administrator command `sudo` to write to your "Program Files" directory, /usr
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Re: PyPM

Postby RBR on Fri Apr 12, 2013 3:36 pm

mockturtl wrote:PyPM is part of the commercial "ActivePython" implementation. You don't need it on Linux; python 2.7 and 3.2 are preinstalled.

(The whole story of installing is different on Linux. You don't browse the web and download programs; 95% of all the software you want is available in the distro's "repository." You install these "packages" through the Software Manager, or the command line. You get automatic updates for everything.)

http://packages.linuxmint.com/
http://packages.ubuntu.com/

Similarly, the python ecosystem consists of a package repository, "PyPI." You get these modules with the `pip` command. (`easy_install` is an alternative to pip.)

The line between the two is not so clear; some code is "OS stuff" to me (my system depends on this language!), but "language stuff" to you (my code should run in any OS!). And maybe you need different versions for different projects. So there's a bit of an art to keeping all your pythons wrangled.

Code: Select all
$ apt install python-pip                                # `apt` is Mint's install command
$ apt install python-lxml python-numpy python-dateutil  # pycollada depends on some libraries
$ sudo pip install pycollada                            # need the administrator command `sudo` to write to your "Program Files" directory, /usr



Thanks that worked well. Perhaps a tangent to this. On windows I used PyScripter (brilliant IDE) and am wondering if there is/ what is the equivalent in linux. I am using geany now which is fine, but:

- I would link to have a kind of command windos (similar to that in Pyscripter or the command window in Matlab). It makes debugging and post processing so much easier
- it is really nice to have a function where you can evaluate selected code rather then only the entire program (similar to f9 button in matlab, or its equivalent in pyscripter)

note: maybe you can do this in geany, but I have not found it yet
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Re: PyPM

Postby overthetop on Sat Apr 13, 2013 4:13 pm

RBR wrote:Thanks that worked well. Perhaps a tangent to this. On windows I used PyScripter (brilliant IDE) and am wondering if there is/ what is the equivalent in linux.

I personally use Geany and Vim for Python.
Many people like eric (its in the repos) and WING (its comercial but offers free licenses for classroom use and unpaid open source development).

Here a reference:
List of Python editors and IDE's
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