How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby marcus0263 on Mon May 11, 2009 4:15 pm

This Heading Edited by gazza :- NOTE, this is NOT recommended for mint installs a simpler
3 partitions sda1 / , sda2 swap , sda3 /home is sufficient and best practice for future fresh installs.

Simple scheme for slicing up your drive, works for most. This is "assuming" you're running one drive -

/dev/sda1 /boot ext2 256 Meg (keep your kernel/kernels safe)
/dev/sda2 / ext4 8 Gig (should be good to go, give or take a little depending on the size of your disk)
/dev/sda3 /var/log ext4 256 Meg (so you don't have a run away daemon filling up logs then filling up your root file system)
/dev/sda5 /home ext4 rest of the disk minus swap, use gcalc to come up with the right amount
/dev/sda6 swap swap 256 - 512 Meg should be more than enough and keep it at the end of your disk (last partition)


It's simple and with gparted slicing up the drive is a simple process. Always keep boot, root and your logs on their own slice, I actually go farther and put /var, /usr/src, /usr/lib on their own slices also. But the above works well for 99% of the general users. Following the Microsoft worlds way of everything on one slice you're setting yourself up for problems.
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby Husse on Tue May 12, 2009 5:37 am

One comment - if you want hibernate to work swap needs to be slightly larger than your memory
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Re:

Postby ibm450 on Mon Jun 08, 2009 6:23 pm

scorp123 wrote:
kenetics wrote:Thanks. One other question, will there be a /boot for each Linux OS and does Grub reside in the boot?

Each Linux installation has its /boot directory, yes. So this can either just be a sub-directory in each of the root directories of each installation ... or if you really want it super complicated, you could create each /boot for each Linux installation as a separate partition and mount point. The big question is: How are you going to partition your harddisk then so that these things don't get into each other's way ?? (It can be done ... but it's not easy!!) Also, something that you need to think ahead of: The GRUB installation of the last Linux distribution you install is most likely the one that will take control of the Master Boot Record of your harddisk. So when the PC boots, you'll first see the GRUB of the last Linux distribution you installed. All other Linux installations should still be selectable as boot options. Regardless of this, you can still always overwrite the MBR's GRUB with a GRUB from your currently running distribution, regardless in which order it was installed. You'll just have to make sure that the /boot/grub/menu.lst you want to use is right about the various menu entries and that everything is selectable. Basically you can copy and paste the relevant sections of each menu.lst file from one distribution to another (ain't that cool or what?)

My partitioning scheme which I posted in this thread was assuming that one would only have one Linux as the main OS and a Windows installation somewhere (e.g. for the casual game here and there).

With multiple Linux installations things might be slightly more complicated. Let's take a 120 GB disk as basis and let's assume you would install up to three Linux distros on it (e.g. for evaluation purposes). Let's assume we're talking about these fine Linux distributions:
    - openSuSE 10.2
    - Linux Mint "Bianca"
    - Fedora Core 6
So here we go:
    /dev/hda1 -- 15 GB openSUSE 10.2, containing everything but /home
    /dev/hda2 -- 15 GB Fedora Core 6, containing everything but /home
    /dev/hda3 -- 15 GB Linux Mint, containing everything but /home
    /dev/hda4 -- extended partition, from here to the end of the HD
    /dev/hda5 -- ca. 75-78 GB shared /home between all three distros (user names could nontheless be different between the three; having the same user name on all three may create new problems eg. with incompatible settings in GNOME and KDE ... with the help of symbolic links stuff like documents, browser settings, etc. could still be shared easily between all three distros and user accounts!) ...Very important: Make sure you only format this partition the first time (e.g. during the installation of the first Linux distro you want to use) and then don't format it in all subsequent installations! :wink: Or else: bye bye oh beloved files, bye bye browser settings, bye bye e-mails ... :wink:
    /dev/hda9 -- swap, whatever is left of the harddisk (e.g. 2 GB)




can not get to run 2 distros on my system. i install LM7 then LM6KDE and all turns pear shape. the system wont load up and KDE installation over writes LM7 grub. as far as creating the separate partitions i cant seem to understand how to use different partions to install other distros on to it. can some1 explain do a step to step tutorial on exactly what to do from partitions to installing other distros to modifying the grub etc.

also i find playing video files on LM very grainy and washed (even adjusting the sat - contrast levels) opposed to playing them in xp which play crisp clear
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Postby FedoraRefugee on Tue Jun 16, 2009 9:19 am

ibm450 wrote:can not get to run 2 distros on my system. i install LM7 then LM6KDE and all turns pear shape. the system wont load up and KDE installation over writes LM7 grub. as far as creating the separate partitions i cant seem to understand how to use different partitions to install other distros on to it. can some1 explain do a step to step tutorial on exactly what to do from partitions to installing other distros to modifying the grub etc.

also i find playing video files on LM very grainy and washed (even adjusting the sat - contrast levels) opposed to playing them in xp which play crisp clear


If you are still talking to me I can answer your grub issue. As was stated in the post you quoted the last Mint install is overwriting the grub of the first. Even here you have several ways to go, you could just use the first distro grub and not install any other grubs if the succeeding distros allow that, you could just use the last distro's grub to overwrite the first grubs in the MBR, you could install something like supergrub last to overwrite all distro grubs or you could chainload slave distro grubs from a single master distro grub. I suggest the last. The link Fred gave you in the other thread describes how to do this. The advantage is that each distro keeps its own grub so that if you update that distro's kernel it will be automatically written in that grub's menu.lst. This is a lot of info, huh? This is why I got "bitter" with your posts, you need to understand there is no "easy" one size fits all answer.

RE partitioning, do yourself a favor. I dont know if you are in the field right now or what your internet situation is like, but at first available opportunity go here:

http://sourceforge.net/project/showfile ... _id=173828

and download the latest gparted live CD and burn it to a disc. This is a small bootable Linux distro (Gentoo i believe) that will open with the Gparted partitioning tool open on the desktop. With this tool you can create and modify your partitioning layout easily. This is how you create your partitions. Just choose the layout you need. Use the above post, or the one Fred linked to, or even the layout I suggested in the other thread, here again, there are many options and everyone will argue over what's best. The answer to what is best is what works for you.

RE the /home thing, here again, I emphasize, create a /data partition. The above post's method will work, as long as you have different user names per distro. But WHY even bother? Just create a /data for your personal documents and share it between all distros and keep /home small and in the / partition of each distro.

I apologize for slamming you around in the other thread, we are all here to help. But you need to allow us to help you first! You will need to set up a dialog with someone and describe your needs. You will get personal attention and someone will walk you through this, but you need to understand that one size does not fit all.

I suggest you start a thread for each problem. One thread of your own for partitioning, another for the video problem.
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby MintyCat on Tue Oct 20, 2009 5:54 pm

I'm bringing this to life again, since I'm about to make a clean install of Gloria on my desktop and while searching the Linux Mint Wiki, I found an article on howto partition and it had a link for this thread, and I thought it would be interesting if you guys just gave me your opinion on my partitioning scheme, since I'm highly unsure of it, being used to just having a separate /home partition and a swap twice bigger than my RAM. :)

But first, let me say I've read the previous pages on this thread, and found some interesting opinions I would like to briefly discuss. :wink:

linuxviolin wrote:Personally I would say to you not to be bored, for a home user use simply 1 partition for / (about 10 GB should be enough) and 1 for /home, both in ext3.

For swap use 1 GB maximum and I recommend to you to lower the swappiness (that depends on your memory):

"The use of the swap memory by default on Kernel 2.6.xx is set to 60% that means that the system will use intensively the swap memory. This sounds good if we have a small amount of memory (around 512MB or less) and lot of load on our PC especially if it is working as server. But if we have plenty of RAM (at least 1GB), as I do which is 2GB, and we are using our PC as desktop machine for daily use, we can change the percentage of swap to be utilized. This setting will increase the performance of Linux experience." (Vichar Bhatt)

Run at the CLI, as root:

cat /proc/sys/vm/swappiness

You should see 60. Now change it to 10 (or even 0 as I did it, adapt according to your system, test):

sysctl -w vm.swappiness=10

Now is time to work for some minutes with some applications if you see that is better, you can make the changes permanent, adding this line at the end of /etc/sysctl.conf:

vm.swappiness=10


Well, I have to agree. A separate /home seems enough to me, the average desktop user. I don't run a server, but I do like to install new software, do some distro hopping but mainly I just listen to music, browse the web and write down some stuff. So why should I give myself an headache, creating all those partitions, when I know it's not worth it, given the circumstances. And with so many partitions, anyone is bound to be confused, and when I install or upgrade an distro, I like it to be as smooth and clean as possible, and I think the average Joe/Jane, thinks the same. If they didn't, they would probably not be reading this thread. :wink:

And very useful tip you got us there, linuxviolin! Many thanks. :D

I have 3GB RAM on both my desktop and laptop, and I was so worried it wasn't enough I always did a swap partition with at least 5GB. Prolly I just need 3GB, maybe less, right? :?:

nelamvr6 wrote:
scorp123 wrote:And where should it put /home? On your Windows partition? Before or after " / "? On a separate disk? On your USB stick? On your external harddisk? .... You see the problem?


No, I can't see the problem at all!

At this point I will have told the installer I want to, for example, use the largest free contiguous space for my Linux installation.

Why can the installer take that specification, and then divvy it up appropriately between /, /home and swap?

I didn't tell the installer where I wanted my swap partition, how did it know where to put that?

You want a separate /home => you've got to define it, partition your harddrive and then tell the installer to mount your /home there.


Why? I mean, we're speaking in hypotheticals here, and we all want to make Linux better, right? Why should I have to tell it anything?

UNIX-like OS simply expect that *You* know what you do.


And this is what has to change if we want broader acceptance of Linux on the desktop.

All I know is that I'm not a dummy, and I'm not completely computer illiterate either. But the installer never even mentioned a separate /home partition. Only after installing, only then do I read both you and Clem posting that one should at a minimum have a separate /home partition!

I understand what you are saying, but isn't Mint about making things work the right way out of the box? Why can't the installer at least ask me if I want a separate /home partition?


This was a very productive discussion in my opinion, and an interesting theme that Linux users should discuss with developers, so we can all work together and make things as simple but still as reliable as possible. Aren't we supposed to evolve after all? :wink:

I know Linux is all about control and choice, but at least distros like Linux Mint should make an effort to incorporate suggestions like these on their systems, making it even easier for a new user to come into this scary and unknown world. Maybe during the install process, prompt the availability of a root account or the creation of a /home partition, if the user wishes so, but at the same time, inform the user of what they're doing, the consequences or the importance to rely on solutions like those. You know, live to the expectation, giving the hand so the user can give the first steps without falling, and when the user finally learns how to support himself enough to walk, have the option to change to a much complex and challenging distro. mintAssistant was just the tip of the iceberg, I think we should go deeper, try out something like Ubuntu Karmic's presentation screens, that let the user know, in a simple and clear language, what they're about to meet when the log in into their new system, what apps they have available, etc. Use that as a model, and make something like it, that accommodates the user's journey through the install. :)

And now, finally, my partitioning scheme, followed by some questions:

HDD -- 500GB

/dev/sda1: /boot [150 MB]
/dev/sda2: / [20GB, because here apps get installed, right? so I need some space]
/dev/sda3: extended partition, up and until the end of the disk
/dev/sda4: /usr [5GB, what's this for?]
/dev/sda5: NFTS (Factory_Image)
/dev/sda6: /opt [2GB, is that enough or those files get stored in / if this partition doesn't exist?]
/dev/sda7: /var [2GB, do I need this if I'm not running a server?]
/dev/sda8: /home [Rest of the disk]
/dev/sda9: swap [3GB, since I have 3GB RAM]

Supposedly I don't need /srv since I don't run a server, right? :?

And I already have an Windows partition, which contains a recovery image of Vista, and I think it's located in between /usr and /opt. Is there any problem with that? If there is, how can I work it out? :?

And can someone explain to me how do I make that extended partition? What's it for?

Hopefully I haven't got you guys bored, or actually sleeping, I just like to make my contribution to the project the way I can, giving suggestions and participating on the forum. At least for the moment, because I plan on helping much more. Thank you all guys for your time! :D
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby marcus0263 on Tue Oct 20, 2009 6:22 pm

MintyCat wrote:<snip>
And now, finally, my partitioning scheme, followed by some questions:

HDD -- 500GB

/dev/sda1: /boot [150 MB]
/dev/sda2: / [20GB, because here apps get installed, right? so I need some space]
/dev/sda3: extended partition, up and until the end of the disk
/dev/sda4: /usr [5GB, what's this for?]
/dev/sda5: NFTS (Factory_Image)
/dev/sda6: /opt [2GB, is that enough or those files get stored in / if this partition doesn't exist?]
/dev/sda7: /var [2GB, do I need this if I'm not running a server?]
/dev/sda8: /home [Rest of the disk]
/dev/sda9: swap [3GB, since I have 3GB RAM]

Supposedly I don't need /srv since I don't run a server, right? :?

Nope, don't need /srv

MintyCat wrote:And I already have an Windows partition, which contains a recovery image of Vista, and I think it's located in between /usr and /opt. Is there any problem with that? If there is, how can I work it out? :?

Yep, it'll be fine

MintyCat wrote:And can someone explain to me how do I make that extended partition? What's it for?

"extended" get by the hard set 4 partition limitation, by created an "extended" slice you can therefore create more slices in the "extended" slice.

MintyCat wrote:Hopefully I haven't got you guys bored, or actually sleeping, I just like to make my contribution to the project the way I can, giving suggestions and participating on the forum. At least for the moment, because I plan on helping much more. Thank you all guys for your time! :D


I though would change your scheme to this -
/dev/sda1: /boot [150 MB]
Fine

/dev/sda2: / [20GB, because here apps get installed, right? so I need some space]
Don't really need this much, I would only have 10 - 12 GB at most here

/dev/sda3: extended partition, up and until the end of the disk
Yep

/dev/sda4: /usr [5GB, what's this for?]
Fine, maybe even bump it up to 8 GB. This is where most of your programs and libraries are stored

/dev/sda5: NFTS (Factory_Image)
Fine

/dev/sda6: /opt [2GB, is that enough or those files get stored in / if this partition doesn't exist?]
You could remove this completly, not many programs us the /opt file system, some do though and it's safe to be on the root slice

/dev/sda7: /var [2GB, do I need this if I'm not running a server?]
You're going to run into issues with only 2GB here IMO. I would bump this up to at least 5 GB. I also recommend having a slice for /var/log at around 256 MB, this will prevent a misbehaving daemon filling up the logs to bleed over and corrupting critical system files. I always put /var/log on it's own slice.

/dev/sda8: /home [Rest of the disk]
Yep

/dev/sda9: swap [3GB, since I have 3GB RAM]
Don't need this much, I'd personally cut it down to 512MB. But if you plan on using "suspend to disk" (which I never do) you will need a bit over the amount of RAM you have installed. If you're going to use "Suspend to Disk" I'd go amount of RAM + 128 - 256 MB
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby MintyCat on Tue Oct 20, 2009 7:34 pm

marcus0263 wrote:"extended" get by the hard set 4 partition limitation, by created an "extended" slice you can therefore create more slices in the "extended" slice.

I though would change your scheme to this -
/dev/sda1: /boot [150 MB]
Fine

/dev/sda2: / [20GB, because here apps get installed, right? so I need some space]
Don't really need this much, I would only have 10 - 12 GB at most here

/dev/sda3: extended partition, up and until the end of the disk
Yep

/dev/sda4: /usr [5GB, what's this for?]
Fine, maybe even bump it up to 8 GB. This is where most of your programs and libraries are stored

/dev/sda5: NFTS (Factory_Image)
Fine

/dev/sda6: /opt [2GB, is that enough or those files get stored in / if this partition doesn't exist?]
You could remove this completly, not many programs us the /opt file system, some do though and it's safe to be on the root slice

/dev/sda7: /var [2GB, do I need this if I'm not running a server?]
You're going to run into issues with only 2GB here IMO. I would bump this up to at least 5 GB. I also recommend having a slice for /var/log at around 256 MB, this will prevent a misbehaving daemon filling up the logs to bleed over and corrupting critical system files. I always put /var/log on it's own slice.

/dev/sda8: /home [Rest of the disk]
Yep

/dev/sda9: swap [3GB, since I have 3GB RAM]
Don't need this much, I'd personally cut it down to 512MB. But if you plan on using "suspend to disk" (which I never do) you will need a bit over the amount of RAM you have installed. If you're going to use "Suspend to Disk" I'd go amount of RAM + 128 - 256 MB


Oh. So let me see if I caught the drill...

/dev/sda1: /boot [150 MB]
/dev/sda2: / [15GB, just in case]
/dev/sda3: extended partition, up and until the end of the disk [in which /usr, /var, /home and swap are included, right?]
/dev/sda4: /usr [10GB, since I like to install stuff :P]
/dev/sda5: NFTS (Factory_Image)
no more /opt, since whatever was supposed to be here it will be stored in /, am I right?
/dev/sda7: /var [5GB, but how do I make a slice for /var/log? Make /var extended?]
/dev/sda8: /home [Rest of the disk]
/dev/sda9: swap [512MB? Even if I want video editing, compiz and games?]

Thank you very much for your help and quick response :D
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby marcus0263 on Tue Oct 20, 2009 8:30 pm

MintyCat wrote:Oh. So let me see if I caught the drill...

/dev/sda1: /boot [150 MB]
/dev/sda2: / [15GB, just in case]
/dev/sda3: extended partition, up and until the end of the disk [in which /usr, /var, /home and swap are included, right?]
/dev/sda4: /usr [10GB, since I like to install stuff :P]
/dev/sda5: NFTS (Factory_Image)
no more /opt, since whatever was supposed to be here it will be stored in /, am I right?
/dev/sda7: /var [5GB, but how do I make a slice for /var/log? Make /var extended?]
/dev/sda8: /home [Rest of the disk]
/dev/sda9: swap [512MB? Even if I want video editing, compiz and games?]

Thank you very much for your help and quick response :D

You'll need to move slices around, but remember this

swap should to be your last slice
/home next to last
/var/log
/var

Don't loose any sleep over that though, but it's best due to those file systems are written to the most, thus should be on farthest out to the edge of the disk. It's just "good form" to set it up that way. Here's how I would slice up a disk

sda1 /boot
sda2 /
sda3 /usr/src
sda4 extended
sda5 /usr
sda6 /var
sda7 /var/log
sda8 /home
sda10 swap

As for creating a new slice for /var/log you'll need to use gparted which is the easiest for noob's. You can use it to resize, create new slices, delete slices, etc.

Now for the question about the swap, if you're nailing your swap for anything over a few meg here and there you've got bigger things to worry about. I've got my swappiness set to 5 and I very rarely touch it, 512MB should be more than enough. And yes I use the Gimp and have all the 3D eye candy turned on
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby atlef on Wed Oct 21, 2009 12:45 am

/dev/sda1: / 10gb (filesystem ext4)
/dev/sda2: swap 2gb (if you want to hibernate make this atleast the size of your ram)
make the rest /home (filesystem ext4) on an extended partition))

That is all you need.
This is my opinion, these may vary from person to person though.

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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby mzsade on Thu Oct 22, 2009 9:40 am

Speaking of opinions, check out mine, whenever i have to install a new release/reinstall after i mess up, i do it on my ext 4 sda 3, this way my data partition (sda 2, ext 3 for stability) is undisturbed and the partitions are maintained in the "correct disk order".
You may also want to consider viking777's views here: http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=46&t=32578
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby rbpyogesh on Mon Nov 30, 2009 3:19 am

I am a new user...I have used mint 7 for few days...and now using mint 8 as primary and only OS

I have formatted....the hard drive in this manner

Total of 120GB

Primary /---40GB

Logical /home---40GB

Logical /usr/local/--40 GB

According to my understanding after reading this topic home is where all the documents and files are stored.....and usr is where pacakages and other important files are stored.....Correct me If I am wrong

Can anyone suggest me whether this partition is Good or a Bad one

Thanks
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby brian927 on Sat Dec 26, 2009 2:15 am

i have a win7 desktop im about to set up a dual boot on with this mint thanks for all the useful info in here, good stuff
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby bugmenotprettyplz on Wed Sep 08, 2010 11:46 am

Anyone care to come up with the suggestion regarding the latest Debian rolling release of Linux Mint with GPT(GUID)?

Would appreciate it a lot.
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby alex30 on Thu Sep 23, 2010 12:56 am

all the procedures are mentioned above and the another way when you do the partition all the instruction need to follow
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Am wondering if I did this correctly?

Postby bilbojr on Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:18 am

Hello! What a great thread this is! :D
I am a newbie and this is my first post on these forums.
I have been very happy with Mint10 as I recently decided to completely quit Windows 'cold-turkey'. I am using the Gnome distro I believe - it is the 'standard' Mint 10 on the main linuxmint.com page.
I am wanting to try other distros so here is how I partitioned my HD the first time: (I know I can use a live CD and I do before installing it.)

sda1 ext3 / 10GB ~ Linux Mint 10 installed
sda2 ext3 / 10GB ~ I marked it 'do not use' until I installed Ubuntu on this partition
sda3 ext3 10GB ~ 'do not use this partition'
sda5 ext3 /home ~ rest of the HD, until swap
sda6 swap

I believe that the sda4 is the extended and was done automatically. The first 3 are primary. It is a 250gb HD.

So, my questions are:
1. Should I have used the sda2 and sda3 differently than the 'do not use now' option?

2. When I log into either Mint or Ubuntu - Mint for this discussion - I see a 10GB File System on my desktop - is this correct? I assume it is the Ubuntu, sda2 partition that is showing up.

3. I have read that many like to have a /boot slice for each one installed but to be honest I am pretty happy and proud that both OS's work on the first try! I believe scorp123 mentioned this was an ok setup, especially for beginners so do I NEED to have a /boot for each or am I OK?

4. Do software packages get installed to /home? Or somewhere else? Do I need to make another - important - partition for this? I am not worried about a little performance boost (yet) nor security (only one computer) and I don't mind re-installing & configuring (I enjoy it actually :shock: ). I just want the distros to work reliably and to be able to add one or change them out whenever I want.

Forgive my lack of correct terminology but I am trying to get it down!
Thanks for the great community support - made it much easier to quit Windows.

Bilbo

*Will post ss from gparted when i am able*
Last edited by bilbojr on Thu Jan 06, 2011 1:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby Murdock on Thu Jan 06, 2011 12:21 pm

Heres a fresh install
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby bilbojr on Thu Jan 06, 2011 5:41 pm

Continued from my original post a few above here. Dual boot different linux os on same hd.

Here is my partition:
sda1 - mint
sda2 - ubuntu
sda3 - not in use, saving for another distro

Here is my gparted ss:
Image

Now when I click 'Computer'
I have these choices:
250 GB HD : 10 GB File System
cd/dvd drive
printer
File System

My concern is that the 2 FS's have the same files inside when I open them. The first - 250gb... - has a series of numbers and letters at the top (folder title) like 56464564-as56-54d5-6454-54e545454454b54 or whatever they are (the letters are in the correct positions - not the actual numbers/letters). The second FS is '/'.

Is this going to be a big problem? Is something incorrect? Do I need to re-format or re-install?
Thanks so much!

Bilbo
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Re:

Postby latie3822 on Sat Feb 26, 2011 3:45 pm

Redhorse wrote:If you have already few partions then you get problem.
You can't pick one and use it. You must delete it first and make it again. You must go forward and back in the instal. to make this.
And you can't install grub were you like and you can not put it on floppy.
This is on all ubuntu dists.



Yes, I agree. I had this issue arise when I was doing this. I had to go back and delete the partitions I had already, and then I was able to make it again.
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby mariapeter12 on Fri May 20, 2011 3:14 am

There is an hidden danger in partitioning the hard drive as a lot of space can be "lost for use" due to bad partitioning.
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Re: How To: Partition your Hard Drive.

Postby scorp123 on Fri May 20, 2011 5:32 pm

mariapeter12 wrote:There is an hidden danger in partitioning the hard drive as a lot of space can be "lost for use" due to bad partitioning.
In this time and age it is possible to resize the partitions if needed. The current partitioning scheme on my main desktop:

Code: Select all
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda5             2.4G  323M  2.0G  15% /
/dev/sdd1             459G  216M  435G   1% /data2
/dev/sda9             8.0G  147M  7.8G   2% /tmp
/dev/sda1             130M   34M   95M  27% /boot
/dev/sda6             7.1G  3.7G  3.4G  53% /usr
/dev/sdc1             1.4T  969G  338G  75% /data
/dev/sda7             3.5G  604M  2.9G  18% /var
/dev/sda8             6.9G  864M  5.7G  13% /opt
/dev/sda11            543G  337G  200G  63% /home
/home/sysadm/.Private    543G  337G  200G  63% /home/sysadm


Sometimes I install a lot of apps and the space used on /usr will increase up to 6.5G .... Same with /var: too much stuff in /var/tmp or /var/cache can fill that partition pretty fast. And /tmp is safest on its own little partition where it can't cripple / with all those constant writes and reads. As these locations are not on the same partition like / it means that / can't get filled up ... because *that* (= a full root file system!) is *SUPER UGLY* effect-wise: your system turns into a half-dead zombie where nothing works properly, you can't start new programs, you can't kill the running ones .... Yuck. All this because / got filled 100%. So that's why I personally insist on keeping /boot, /, /tmp, /usr, /opt and /var on different partitions.
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