Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Chat about just about anything else

Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby cicero01 on Sun Jan 13, 2013 6:42 am

Having been "persuaded" by a magazine I read to give Linux a try I have spent some hours attempting to do just that.

I tried Ubuntu a few weeks ago but to no avail so recently managed to load Mint 13.

Every time I tried to start it it gave error messages and I had to start all over again eventually after it hadut "repaired" something I got in and it seemed to be OK except that it didn't recognise an external HDD I have.

But having to re-boot several times before it would start up I then thought maybe 14 would be an improvement on 13 after perhaps ironing out errors maybe but that is even worse it won't load at all.

It is clear to me as an amateur that Linux is still very much for "experts" who have sufficient knowledge to work around problems but for the uninitiated it is simply a pain.

Until such time as Mint or any other Linux OS literally runs straight from the box (so to speak) it will remain a niche system.

It is clear that just looking at the number of queries and problems people have on this forum that Mint is not fit for purpose unless I have missed the point completely and that it is simply user testing with a view to producing the next version?

Having wasted many frustrating hours this is clearly not something for an amateur like me and I should stick with Windows which does at least work every time. :(
Last edited by xenopeek on Sun Jan 13, 2013 6:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Not asking for support; so moved from the support forum to the chat forum.
cicero01
Level 2
Level 2
 
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 5:31 am

Linux Mint is funded by ads and donations.
 

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby Pierre on Sun Jan 13, 2013 8:59 am

On the contary - I've placed 'mint' onto lots of PCs,
for the very precise reason - that it is so easy to use . . .

Once people 'get over' that it is not "windows",
& that windows software - won't work
&& that the vast majority of PC users - don't even need that 'O/S'
- to perform 'daily tasks / needs'.

They find that Mint - works very well - for them.

It sounds to me - that you may have a faulty cd . . . . . . .
- see if you can download & burn your own copy.
Image
User avatar
Pierre
Level 7
Level 7
 
Posts: 1721
Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2008 5:33 am
Location: Perth, AU.

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby d00med on Sun Jan 13, 2013 9:01 am

Sorry you had a bad experience. What kind of computer / hardware do you have? Ubuntu and Mint are pretty much expected to run out-of-the-box, and it's a shame when it doesn't work for a new user.

Pierre wrote:On the contary - I've placed 'mint' onto lots of PCs,
for the very precise reason - that it is so easy to use . . .

Once people 'get over' that it is not "windows",
& that windows software - won't work


That attitude isn't going to get anyone anywhere.
d00med
Level 4
Level 4
 
Posts: 333
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 9:55 am

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby nomko on Sun Jan 13, 2013 9:09 am

cicero01 wrote:Having been "persuaded" by a magazine I read to give Linux a try I have spent some hours attempting to do just that.

Which magazine was it?

cicero01 wrote:I tried Ubuntu a few weeks ago but to no avail so recently managed to load Mint 13.
Every time I tried to start it it gave error messages and I had to start all over again eventually after it hadut "repaired" something I got in and it seemed to be OK except that it didn't recognise an external HDD I have.

Which Mint 13 version did you try? The MATE version? Cinnamon version? The KDE version? And what are the spec's of your system?

cicero01 wrote:But having to re-boot several times before it would start up I then thought maybe 14 would be an improvement on 13 after perhaps ironing out errors maybe but that is even worse it won't load at all.


cicero01 wrote:It is clear to me as an amateur that Linux is still very much for "experts" who have sufficient knowledge to work around problems but for the uninitiated it is simply a pain.Until such time as Mint or any other Linux OS literally runs straight from the box (so to speak) it will remain a niche system.

stuff if you ask me! Linux made some good progress regarding user friendliness! It isn't no longer that geek and nerd operating system as it was. Linux has a much steeper learning curve than Windows, keep that in mind. If you're not willing to learn Linux, you will never understand how Linux works and how to solve problems.

cicero01 wrote:It is clear that just looking at the number of queries and problems people have on this forum that Mint is not fit for purpose unless I have missed the point completely and that it is simply user testing with a view to producing the next version?

Like other operating don't come with problems... this is not a good comparison. And for what purpose is Mint not fit for?

cicero01 wrote:Having wasted many frustrating hours this is clearly not something for an amateur like me and I should stick with Windows which does at least work every time. :(

Bye Bye!
MSI GE70-2PE*Quad core Intel Core i7-4710HQ*Kingston 16 GB RAM*Intel 4th Gen. Integr. GPU/NVidia GeForce GTX860M*Qualcomm Atheros Killer E2200/Intel Wireless 3160*Sitecom X5-N600 Router (WLR-5100)

Visit my website:
My personal website
User avatar
nomko
Level 9
Level 9
 
Posts: 2920
Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2012 7:28 pm
Location: The Hague, The Netherlands

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby nomko on Sun Jan 13, 2013 9:13 am

d00med wrote:Sorry you had a bad experience. What kind of computer / hardware do you have? Ubuntu and Mint are pretty much expected to run out-of-the-box, and it's a shame when it doesn't work for a new user.

Pierre wrote:On the contary - I've placed 'mint' onto lots of PCs,
for the very precise reason - that it is so easy to use . . .

Once people 'get over' that it is not "windows",
& that windows software - won't work


That attitude isn't going to get anyone anywhere.


I think what Pierre is referring to is that most new Linux users amuse that they can still use their too expensive bought Windows software on Linux.
MSI GE70-2PE*Quad core Intel Core i7-4710HQ*Kingston 16 GB RAM*Intel 4th Gen. Integr. GPU/NVidia GeForce GTX860M*Qualcomm Atheros Killer E2200/Intel Wireless 3160*Sitecom X5-N600 Router (WLR-5100)

Visit my website:
My personal website
User avatar
nomko
Level 9
Level 9
 
Posts: 2920
Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2012 7:28 pm
Location: The Hague, The Netherlands

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby cicero01 on Sun Jan 13, 2013 11:19 am

nomko wrote:
cicero01 wrote:Having been "persuaded" by a magazine I read to give Linux a try I have spent some hours attempting to do just that.

Which magazine was it?

Computer Active!

cicero01 wrote:I tried Ubuntu a few weeks but to no avail so recently managed to load Mint 13.
Every time I tried to start it it gave error messages and I had to start all over again eventually after it hadut "repaired" something I got in and it seemed to be OK except that it didn't recognise an external HDD I have.

Which Mint 13 version did you try? The MATE version? Cinnamon version? The KDE version? And what are the spec's of your system?

Mate

cicero01 wrote:But having to re-boot several times before it would start up I then thought maybe 14 would be an improvement on 13 after perhaps ironing out errors maybe but that is even worse it won't load at all.


cicero01 wrote:It is clear to me as an amateur that Linux is still very much for "experts" who have sufficient knowledge to work around problems but for the uninitiated it is simply a pain.Until such time as Mint or any other Linux OS literally runs straight from the box (so to speak) it will remain a niche system.

stuff if you ask me! Linux made some good progress regarding user friendliness! It isn't no longer that geek and nerd operating system as it was. Linux has a much steeper learning curve than Windows, keep that in mind. If you're not willing to learn Linux, you will never understand how Linux works and how to solve problems.

The problem is getting it running you can't do much learning if it won't run in the first place!
And as for solving problems that's my point people like me don't want to waste effort "solving problems" we just want it to work!! Which is why you have confirmed my view it ain't for mainstream amateurs if you have to start solving problems.

cicero01 wrote:It is clear that just looking at the number of queries and problems people have on this forum that Mint is not fit for purpose unless I have missed the point completely and that it is simply user testing with a view to producing the next version?

Like other operating don't come with problems... this is not a good comparison. And for what purpose is Mint not fit for?

If I buy a laptop with Windows what problems do I have? In my experience none!

cicero01 wrote:Having wasted many frustrating hours this is clearly not something for an amateur like me and I should stick with Windows which does at least work every time. :(

Bye Bye!


Cheers.
cicero01
Level 2
Level 2
 
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 5:31 am

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby nomko on Sun Jan 13, 2013 12:45 pm

You've placed your quotes at the wrong place :wink:
MSI GE70-2PE*Quad core Intel Core i7-4710HQ*Kingston 16 GB RAM*Intel 4th Gen. Integr. GPU/NVidia GeForce GTX860M*Qualcomm Atheros Killer E2200/Intel Wireless 3160*Sitecom X5-N600 Router (WLR-5100)

Visit my website:
My personal website
User avatar
nomko
Level 9
Level 9
 
Posts: 2920
Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2012 7:28 pm
Location: The Hague, The Netherlands

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby bigj231 on Sun Jan 13, 2013 1:12 pm

I've noticed in my experience that Linux tends to have more issues up front than with windows. Stupid little things wrong with the installer, or setting up graphics drivers, etc... Once you get these issues ironed out, and if you don't try to run the bleeding edge updates or do other stupid things, you don't have to mess with it ever again. Look at some Debian stable systems for a good idea of how problem free a system can be. I've seen several run for years with only the critical security updates and never have issues. I personally still have a Gentoo install running from almost 4 years ago now. I don't use it much, but it is still as quick as it was when I set it up. Not to mention the latest versions of Mint will run without issue on lower end hardware that formerly ran XP. Try running 7 on 512MB of RAM and a 600MHz Pentium.

I've also noticed in my experience that Windows is usually problem free without any configuration when it's new. After a few years (usually less than 2, which coincidentally happens to be the support length for non-LTS releases of Ubuntu/Mint) the Windows systems slow down and most power users will reinstall the system. The "amateur" user will still continue to use the windows system until the hardware dies, despite the slowdown and error messages, or will upgrade to a new system in the false hope that it will fix the slowdown from ever occurring again.

TL;DR: Windows systems are easier to initially setup, but in the long term a Linux system will generally be more problem free. If you don't want to put in the initial setup time, stick with Windows and buy a new computer every few years.
Running on a 4-slot toaster @ 60Hz
User avatar
bigj231
Level 5
Level 5
 
Posts: 793
Joined: Fri Feb 26, 2010 10:16 am
Location: Middle of Nowhere

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby cicero01 on Sun Jan 13, 2013 3:31 pm

bigj231 wrote:I've noticed in my experience that Linux tends to have more issues up front than with windows. Stupid little things wrong with the installer, or setting up graphics drivers, etc... Once you get these issues ironed out, and if you don't try to run the bleeding edge updates or do other stupid things, you don't have to mess with it ever again. Look at some Debian stable systems for a good idea of how problem free a system can be. I've seen several run for years with only the critical security updates and never have issues. I personally still have a Gentoo install running from almost 4 years ago now. I don't use it much, but it is still as quick as it was when I set it up. Not to mention the latest versions of Mint will run without issue on lower end hardware that formerly ran XP. Try running 7 on 512MB of RAM and a 600MHz Pentium.

I've also noticed in my experience that Windows is usually problem free without any configuration when it's new. After a few years (usually less than 2, which coincidentally happens to be the support length for non-LTS releases of Ubuntu/Mint) the Windows systems slow down and most power users will reinstall the system. The "amateur" user will still continue to use the windows system until the hardware dies, despite the slowdown and error messages, or will upgrade to a new system in the false hope that it will fix the slowdown from ever occurring again.

TL;DR: Windows systems are easier to initially setup, but in the long term a Linux system will generally be more problem free. If you don't want to put in the initial setup time, stick with Windows and buy a new computer every few years.


Hi,

I've been using XP for heaven knows how many years and on a couple of occasions have re-installed it from the same disk to see if it makes much difference. Thing is when I've re-installed it just works as it did before - no hassle.

My better half has a Toshiba laptop running Windows 7 for the last two years or so without issue and it seems OK.

I decided that as XP was pretty old I'd try Linux but perhaps naively wasn't expecting to have to embark on problem solving just to get it to run. Maybe I'm just unlucky?

I still think Linux is for folks with more than my rudimentary knowledge of computing as if it doesn't install and run straight off I'm pretty much stuck.

Cheers. :)
cicero01
Level 2
Level 2
 
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 5:31 am

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby xenopeek on Sun Jan 13, 2013 5:52 pm

cicero01 wrote:I still think Linux is for folks with more than my rudimentary knowledge of computing as if it doesn't install and run straight off I'm pretty much stuck.

That goes for any operating system. You've been lucky that your computers worked with Windows XP and Windows 7, but then you probably only installed the Windows version that you got when you bought the computers. There are plenty of stories (at least I have a few...) of users trying to install a new Windows version onto an older computer and failing horribly. Manufacturers too often don't supply drivers for older computers on newer Windows versions, or it takes very long for the drivers to become available or to be updated to fix bugs. Once you run into your operating system not working out of the box on your computer, you'll be in for some work regardless of the operating system you use.

But as always, use whatever works best for you :wink:
User avatar
xenopeek
Level 21
Level 21
 
Posts: 15285
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2011 3:58 am
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby lexon on Sun Jan 13, 2013 8:56 pm

A few weeks ago I dual booted my girlfriends slow XP desktop. Works fine and I am not a Linux techie type. I very rarely ever mess with command line. Lazy former Windows user you might say.
She has never been happier with her PC. No more bloatware bothering her.
I have put Mint 9 in an older Toshiba Satellite laptop that has probably 500mb Ram and a little slow but works. It is a back up PC for her.

L
Lindows, Linspire, Freespire, Ubuntu, Mint 15 Cinnamon, Mint 16 XFCE, Mint 17 Cinnamon 64 bit.
lexon
Level 5
Level 5
 
Posts: 726
Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2009 10:53 pm
Location: MA USA

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby cicero01 on Mon Jan 14, 2013 5:54 am

I think the various comments made in response to my observations have been helpful but haven't changed my views particularly.

I ve long had an issue in regard to the marketing and selling of computers which are generally promoted to the unsuspecting consumer in the same way as a TV or radio is - you switch it on and away you go nothing more to learn or to have to do.

A friend of mine bought a new laptop last year and within a few weeks something had gone wrong - whether his fault or not I don't know - and since then it has been sitting on a shelf unused and unusable as he has no idea what is wrong or how to fix it although why he doesn't take it to a repairer I don't know.

My grumble with mint was that although it apparently installed OK every time I restarted it it failed and I had to switch off and try again. Generally, second or third time it started up. But it's all time wasting and irritating.

I then tried v14 which refused to install at all!

But then maybe I'm just unlucky.
cicero01
Level 2
Level 2
 
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 5:31 am

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby nomko on Mon Jan 14, 2013 8:13 am

xenopeek wrote:There are plenty of stories.....of users trying to install a new Windows version onto an older computer and failing horribly. Manufacturers too often don't supply drivers for older computers on newer Windows versions

The problem with this is that Microsoft starts dropping any kind of support for older hardware or demands hardware manufacturers to end the Windows support for older hardware. I think this has to do to get Windows much more stable by avoiding 32-bits drivers on a 64-bits system. Putting 32-bits drivers into a 64-bit OS makes it much unstable. Focussing on newer hardware, which only can function in a 64-bit system, improves the stability of Windows. There's a lesser or no reason to have the 32-bit backwards compatibility mode alive under Windows 7 and nowadays Windows 8. And also the amount of users who still work with very old hardware are getting lesser and lesser in such way that Microsoft doesn't see any reason to keep that 32-bit backwards compatibility mode up-and-running for newer Windows versions. Eventually people will buy newer hardware...

This is also one of the many advantages of Linux, still capable of running on older hardware. But even here the fact remains that old(er) hardware will get replaced by time.

And now the topic title: Linux Mint - not for the amateur... i disagree with this. Linux has come from far to get rid of that geek and nerd label. Installing Linux is as easy as installing Windows. In fact, 2 weeks ago i installed W7 on a laptop of a relative of mine and i was surprised to see that it had some similarities with the way how to install Linux. If somebody is claiming that it is really difficult to install Linux...that person is either non-technical or stupid or stubborn with Windows or not willing to learn Linux! Ofcourse Linux hasn't reached by far the status of Windows, but why should Linux? I enjoy Linux, i enjoy Mint. And my experience is that people are getting more curious about Linux rather than looking at me and asking if i'm a geek or a nerd or a computerfreak... When i explain them the advantages of Linux i really see that they are interested.
MSI GE70-2PE*Quad core Intel Core i7-4710HQ*Kingston 16 GB RAM*Intel 4th Gen. Integr. GPU/NVidia GeForce GTX860M*Qualcomm Atheros Killer E2200/Intel Wireless 3160*Sitecom X5-N600 Router (WLR-5100)

Visit my website:
My personal website
User avatar
nomko
Level 9
Level 9
 
Posts: 2920
Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2012 7:28 pm
Location: The Hague, The Netherlands

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby cicero01 on Mon Jan 14, 2013 4:12 pm

Well I decided to give the thing one more try!!

So tonight I started again first effort it stalled on a small rectangular box on the top left of the screen - nothing moved.

Second attempt.

This time when it said it was starting in x seconds I pressed enter and it produced a screen with various options - I when for option 1

To my surprise it started to install and this time for the first time it seemed to go through the whole process including the slide show which it didn't before.

After about 50 minutes it said it had finished and asked if I wanted to carry on testing or restart.

Perhaps foolishly as it said it had finished I took out the DVD and it promptly threw a wobbler! I wasn't pleased.

Anyway re-booted and started from a line of options which said load normally or repair or something and others which I've forgotten.

To my relief it loaded and appears to be running OK. :o

As i write i am listening to Beethoven's Moonlight sonata on You Tube as I've just learned the piece and like to hear a real pianist play it.

Maybe its going to be OK although I loaded it alongside XP as it offered a choice on booting although it actually goes straight into Mint but I can live with that.

Thanks to everyone who responded but my view hasn't changed that much it's still a more fraught process than installing Windows but if it keeps working I'll
stick with it.

Wonder why Mint 14 won't load at all? I think i'll give that a miss.

Regards to all, but I may be back! :)
cicero01
Level 2
Level 2
 
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 5:31 am

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby The-Wizard on Mon Jan 14, 2013 4:25 pm

Like others i find the title a little misleading, my daughter a staunch windows user asked me to install my operating system on her laptop about 6 months ago as her windows had thrown yet another wobbly, having done this and finding all her lost files and pictures prior to installation she was impressed, so far she has not had any problems in use or stability, her daughter [our 6 yr old granddaughter] has a laptop i keep here for her to use, I set it up with mint 9 lxde originally, before her last visit i changed it to mint 14 cinnamon without asking she was able to switch on find and use her programs and before departing switch off..

now if my daughter can use it without problem and granddaughter can use it there cant be a lot wrong

wizard
asus M2N-MX board, AMD x2 6000 amd/ati graphics 4x1mb ddr2, 21" HD screen Mint 17-64 cinnamon
Acer ZG5 -mint 17 Xfce dell 1545 mint 17-64

"I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that i don't know the answer " [Douglas Adams]
User avatar
The-Wizard
Level 9
Level 9
 
Posts: 2544
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 3:12 pm
Location: Bedforshire, ENGLAND

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby cicero01 on Mon Jan 14, 2013 6:06 pm

The-Wizard wrote:Like others i find the title a little misleading, my daughter a staunch windows user asked me to install my operating system on her laptop about 6 months ago as her windows had thrown yet another wobbly, having done this and finding all her lost files and pictures prior to installation she was impressed, so far she has not had any problems in use or stability, her daughter [our 6 yr old granddaughter] has a laptop i keep here for her to use, I set it up with mint 9 lxde originally, before her last visit i changed it to mint 14 cinnamon without asking she was able to switch on find and use her programs and before departing switch off..

now if my daughter can use it without problem and granddaughter can use it there cant be a lot wrong

wizard


Using it wasn't the problem getting the thing to install properly was the problem!
cicero01
Level 2
Level 2
 
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 5:31 am

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby The-Wizard on Mon Jan 14, 2013 7:22 pm

only time i have had that problem was with either a corrupted download or burn to disc
asus M2N-MX board, AMD x2 6000 amd/ati graphics 4x1mb ddr2, 21" HD screen Mint 17-64 cinnamon
Acer ZG5 -mint 17 Xfce dell 1545 mint 17-64

"I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that i don't know the answer " [Douglas Adams]
User avatar
The-Wizard
Level 9
Level 9
 
Posts: 2544
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 3:12 pm
Location: Bedforshire, ENGLAND

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby homerscousin on Tue Jan 15, 2013 9:44 pm

People, I have only been running Linux since July 2012 and I can say a few generalitities. #1 Distro does make a difference. Some distros do run better on certain hardware than others, and this saves you from troubleshooting the why-nots.#2 Linux is open source and free, holy crap, spend a little time learning what it is all about. #3 Some things don't work so well in Linux, like sound and video (tearing and sincronization), and power management. Some can be fixed, some can't. #4 Linux will, maybe unfortunately, force you to be a better computer user. If you can't or won't even learn basic terminal commands, use Windows. Linux is not for those who want everything handed to them on the silver platter. It's for those that want to learn and feel a need to contribute to an opperating system that can be the best that YOU want it to be. How much motivation do you have?

I'm waiting on the new KDE to see how animated wallpapers turns out. Just didn't have the expertise to get the old stuff a 'workin.
i5 3570k, ASRock z77 Extreme 4, 8 Gb Ripjaws 1600, Antec 430w psu, HVR 1600 tv tuner, custom case- marble top, oak face. Carver & DCM Time Window sound system. Mint 14 KDE.
homerscousin
Level 5
Level 5
 
Posts: 541
Joined: Fri May 25, 2012 2:43 pm
Location: Somewhere on planet Earth (mostly)

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby chiefjim on Wed Jan 16, 2013 8:40 am

cicero01 wrote:Having been "persuaded" by a magazine I read to give Linux a try I have spent some hours attempting to do just that.

I tried Ubuntu a few weeks ago but to no avail so recently managed to load Mint 13.

Every time I tried to start it it gave error messages and I had to start all over again eventually after it hadut "repaired" something I got in and it seemed to be OK except that it didn't recognise an external HDD I have.

But having to re-boot several times before it would start up I then thought maybe 14 would be an improvement on 13 after perhaps ironing out errors maybe but that is even worse it won't load at all.

It is clear to me as an amateur that Linux is still very much for "experts" who have sufficient knowledge to work around problems but for the uninitiated it is simply a pain.

Until such time as Mint or any other Linux OS literally runs straight from the box (so to speak) it will remain a niche system.

:(


A difficult comparison since items like W7 run "straight from the box" is because someone else already installed it. Anyone who has tried installing XP or W7 from scratch knows it can be a challenge. Generally installing a OS you're already familiar with is always easier than working with something else. As evidenced when you said later in this thread:

"After about 50 minutes it said it had finished and asked if I wanted to carry on testing or restart.

Perhaps foolishly as it said it had finished I took out the DVD and it promptly threw a wobbler! I wasn't pleased."

Amateur mistakes for sure. You're not alone though. I know at least one computer program analyst that got thrown during partitioning because the screen said DO NOT USE. He thought it was an instruction not to use, instead being one of several available choices.
Desktop:
Mint-17 Mate 64 bit
Gigabyte GA-MA785GM-US2H
AMD Athlon II X3 425
CORSAIR 4GB DDR2 800
640GB HDD WD Black 7200rpm

Laptop:
Acer Aspire AS5552-5898
Mint-17 Mate 64 bit
AMD Phenom II Triple-Core N830
4GB Memory DDR3
500GB HDD 5400rpm
chiefjim
Level 4
Level 4
 
Posts: 458
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2009 7:26 am
Location: South Texas, USA

Re: Linux Mint - not for the amateur

Postby AnonKS on Wed Jan 16, 2013 10:52 am

When installing ubuntu for the first time, I ejected the disc too. Totally understandable noob mistake :-D

Other than that, I had a problem with kvm being "off" in my bios by default. Quick fix. Then installing AMD microbits. 30 seconds on google, 10 seconds in terminal, fixed. After a week on mint 14, I get 0 error messages, and everything just flows. Love it. I have to say, I've had more problems in the past with xp and win7 installation than with linux.
And after some getting used to, I find doing certain tasks in the terminal to be way faster than with a wizard. Anybody else feel that way, too?

Sent from my HTC EVO 3D X515m using Tapatalk 2
AnonKS
Level 1
Level 1
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2013 10:29 am
Location: Germany

Linux Mint is funded by ads and donations.
 
Next

Return to Open chat

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests