What are your top tips for a Newbie?

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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby powerhouse on Tue Feb 26, 2013 3:59 am

About the last post from homerscousin, different people have different experiences. I'm referring to searching for solutions on the Internet. I've been using both Windows and Linux for many years and am usually quite OK with solving things. But in my opinion, it's much easier to find a good answer to a Linux problem than it is finding an answer to a Windows problem. Thanks to guys on this and other Linux forums and websites, Linux is actually documented quite well, and there are a lot of intelligent people out there who actually know a little about Linux.

I have found searching for solutions to Windows problems to be quite challenging. A lot of advise published on the net is garbage, and Microsoft's own help pages are only lately improving a bit. While I can't remember having ever been stuck with a Linux problem that I couldn't figure out myself or through the Internet, I had to seek professional help at least a dozen times with different Microsoft OS products (luckily I always had some experts around, or only a phone call away).

So my conclusion:
1. Don't be afraid using Linux (particularly Linux Mint which is very easy) - if you run into a problem search the Internet with a quote of the error message or problem description. Narrow down the search if necessary, by adding "linux mint" or "ubuntu" to the search phrase (Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu, so most solutions that work for Ubuntu will also work for Linux Mint). Chances are you'll find an answer.

2. If you can't find an answer to the problem, open a thread under the relevant category. Provide some information about the computer and Linux installation you've got, as well as a problem description and error messages / logs. If you don't know how to describe the problem or where to find relevant information to narrow down the issue, just do your best to provide a meaningful post. Most likely someone will jump in with specific advice on how to provide more information, or what to do next. There are lots of knowledgeable people here that are able and willing to help.

3. In time you will become an expert, like many here.
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I want to know some stupid things about mint.

Postby shihan on Wed Feb 27, 2013 2:19 am

I am very new like new born baby about linux mint. I wan to learn basic things about linux mint kernel. how tho design it and how I can use a good use of kernel in network. also want to know about network modules.

Thanks in advance.
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby wannabegeek on Thu Feb 28, 2013 2:55 pm

daveinuk wrote: don't dual boot would be my recommendation, put it solely on a machine to learn from if you can.



I agree....this is a great tip....perhaps use a second hard drive and change over with the BIOS during start up...
Also, don't buy ANY hardware, esp the computer, without first googling how well it plays with Linux and in particular Mint.

cheers
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby Skara Brae on Sun Mar 03, 2013 6:36 pm

A few months ago, a relative asked me to install Windows 7 on his old desktop PC. I so did, and with his permission, I also put Mint ("Maya") on it. Due to circumstances, his PC is still in my possession and he hasn't met Maya yet - I hope his wife won't get jealous. :D

What I find a very good tip for a newbie: if you want dual-booting, then have 2 harddrives in your PC; one for Windows and the second for Linux. Instead of partitioning a single harddrive.

One of the biggest "whoa"-things for me, years ago, was partitioning. With 2 harddrives, that is no longer a problem (but then again, it isn't a problem either with Mint 14, I saw earlier tonight... But what if something goes wrong?).

Another thing that can be an issue for beginners is getting rid of GRUB. With 2 harddrives, the bootloader gets onto HD number 2, leaving the Windows MBR on HD number 1 intact, making it easier to go back to Windows. When my relative will/would no longer want Mint, all he will have to do is switch the SATA cables of the two harddrives inside his PC, so that Windows 7 is the main OS again: no more "bootsect /nt60 C:\" or whatever.

In my case, my second HD contains all my personal files. Mint and Vista are on the first HD.
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby themraw435 on Mon Mar 11, 2013 10:44 am

Linux is great for a lot of things very versatile you can use it on a desktop or set it up on a home server. I am lucky enough to be going to school for network engineering and had a semester long class devoted to Linux, Fedora 13 to be exact. There are some subtle changes between Fedoa and Mint but I like MInt as my desktop simply because it has a nicer GUI to look at. For those looking to get started I found these sites very helpful and still use them as refreshers. http://nixsrv.com/llthw http://cli.learncodethehardway.org/book/

Both are free and are pretty good guides on using the terminal. I use the terminal for most of my tasks in Mint and other distros, If you understand how to use the terminal it gives you a better understanding of the system and it gives you bragging rights over your friends ;) good luck everyone and happy learning!!
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby kyeshi98 on Mon Mar 18, 2013 1:19 pm

My favorite tip:
Have fun!

:)

(Okay, sorry for being absolutely not helpful, I just love Mint too much)

But yeah, I would say, just surf on the forums, experiment with stuff (be careful though), and for me,
onEncounterProblem = function(){
consult(google || linuxMintForums);
}

:P

Again, have fun!
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby DrHu on Mon Mar 18, 2013 2:02 pm

Tips usually are only one user's experience, and may or may not be accurate, and likely only cover a specific hardware/software issue..

I would say this
  • Read the users manual provided by the specific Linux distributor
    --if one is availabel
  • Become familiar with:
    --FHS (File Hiearchy System)
    --Partitioning hard drives
    --Desktop applications and desktop usage
    --terminal use: commands (bash)
    --networking
  • Use the forums, irc channels (if you want a more inline chat style of Q & A.)
https://wiki.linuxfoundation.org/en/FHS
http://www.addictivetips.com/ubuntu-lin ... ntu-linux/
http://www.basicconfig.com/ubuntu_deskt ... tion_guide


Terminal
It really is quite useful and faster (provided you can use the commands), after some repeated entries of the same command line, you would get to know the routine, and wouldn't be flumuxed by most of what is shown
--one tip for the command line, sometimes there is no apparent response from the system, that just means the command was accepted and has no response. Hit the enter key to see the prompt; dfeinitely don't just wait and think something will happen (just give it a litle time, ~5secs is more than enough wait time for most commands
https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Linux_For ... mmand_Line

I am think apt (Debian's package manager: although they seem to keep going apt or aptitude and maybe aren't sure which one they want users to prefer..) is way faster than any of the GUI package managers' (Synaptic or Mint's own version), prpvided you know what you want to install; even searches are quicker..
Code: Select all
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade
--two commands I am always using to make sure I am up-to-date for the OS + applications

http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/linux-deb ... sheet.html
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby jamvaru on Wed Mar 27, 2013 3:27 pm

have patience with the people in the linux community
they are struggling like you
patience is a valuable commodity
you WILL learn and succeed
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby P1xel on Thu Mar 28, 2013 7:28 pm

My top tip: DON"T CHANGE YOUR MIND

My friend kept on switching distros, and almost bricked his laptop
Just stay with one thing, until you are ready to switch. :mrgreen:
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby Wouter_db on Thu Apr 04, 2013 4:36 am

What I want to give Newbs is a vision:

There is a shift going on. You may have noticed, especially if you're into computing for some years, that with every new version of an commercial OS (Also OS's of smartphones, tablets etc) that you'll get less and less options to change stuff, and that the core of the system is being shielded from you. You are presented with in effect an 'GUI-over-an-GUI', where you are only allowed to change stuff like wallpapers, install some 'safe' apps and such and alter minor stuff. Windows XP for example is the last MS OS ever to run in that way, with most options readily available.

MS, and pretty much every commercial developer are trying really really hard to eliminate free choice, because having us 'fool around' is bad for predictability, and that is the holy grail. Users neatly guided on well trodden paths like cattle makes for excellent predictability in terms selling more stuff to us to feed our short term gratification.
Don't be fooled, look closer to most new developments (like the 'secure UEFI', Windows 8 touchfocus and Metro and so many other 'handy features for our benefit'), and you will see the drive for CONTROL. And the future of commercial OS's are only going further in streamlining the 'user experience' until no on knows anymore how computers really work (today's whatsappping smartphone kiddies anyone?).


In short, Linux is WORTH every single bit (lame pun) of your time, and that includes cursing and swearing trying to fix stuff. Because Linux has a FREE future where you still learn-by-doing how you want stuff to work for YOU, not some corporations sales.
Fresh happy penguin since mid juli 2012. Running Mint14 XFCE on my Asus R051DX, and Mate on my HP pav dv6000.
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby Delirium on Fri Apr 05, 2013 3:42 pm

@ Wouter_db: You are more than right.

We need to show them that with Microsoft/Apple... they are running into a trap and the only way is to jump off.
We need to spread the real sense of LiGNUx. If its technically better or not, f*** it. It is sad how a lot of people do not even care about democracy and rights anymore.

What counts is control, transparency, independence, flexibility and freedom. And this should be clear.
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby songtothesirens on Fri Apr 05, 2013 6:06 pm

From one "semi" noob to another: there is a wealth of information on these forums, and if you cannot find your answer here, try Googling it. There are a lot of sites devoted to Linux and the various distros. Some of these sites are pretty technical so if it doesn't make sense right away, don't try it unless the instructions are really clear. I have broken my system before thinking I had it down, but then no, not so much. Also, if you have a Kindle or something like it, there are free books on Linux and the various distros that can show you different command line stuff and what the outcome will be. These are nice because you can use them like workbooks and type along with the author.

I hope you enjoy Linux and learning it as much as I do. It is a challenge sometimes, but it is well worth it to be able to have real control over what your computer does. Oh, and it's free and so is most of the software. Happy learning!! :)
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby songtothesirens on Fri Apr 05, 2013 6:27 pm

Delirium wrote:@ Wouter_db: You are more than right.

We need to show them that with Microsoft/Apple... they are running into a trap and the only way is to jump off.
We need to spread the real sense of LiGNUx. If its technically better or not, f*** it. It is sad how a lot of people do not even care about democracy and rights anymore.

What counts is control, transparency, independence, flexibility and freedom. And this should be clear.



I wholeheartedly agree with both your statements. I have never used a a Mac so I am not that familiar with that O/S, but I think I have had every version of Windows that has been put out. Windows 8 and Vista are, in my opinion, the worst for various reason. However, I had tried a switch to Linuxmint 12 about a year or so ago, and got a little overwhelmed by the fact that it is command line driven, and I had little experience (and patience) with it. Well, then I got irritated with Microsoft again, and now I run Linuxmint 14/Nadia, and i am quite happily learning how to use the system, running down information anywhere I can get it, and I am not going back to Windows.......ever. I want to be the one in control of what my computer does, I want my computer to be "mine", I have always believed that software and an O/S should be free or at least reasonably priced, the free software for Linux has fewer bugs than the paid for software for Microsoft due to the constant redevelopment, with Linux there is nothing hidden: it just is. And, that, I think is beautiful.
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby songtothesirens on Fri Apr 05, 2013 7:10 pm

powerhouse wrote:About the last post from homerscousin, different people have different experiences. I'm referring to searching for solutions on the Internet. I've been using both Windows and Linux for many years and am usually quite OK with solving things. But in my opinion, it's much easier to find a good answer to a Linux problem than it is finding an answer to a Windows problem. Thanks to guys on this and other Linux forums and websites, Linux is actually documented quite well, and there are a lot of intelligent people out there who actually know a little about Linux.

I have found searching for solutions to Windows problems to be quite challenging. A lot of advise published on the net is garbage, and Microsoft's own help pages are only lately improving a bit. While I can't remember having ever been stuck with a Linux problem that I couldn't figure out myself or through the Internet, I had to seek professional help at least a dozen times with different Microsoft OS products (luckily I always had some experts around, or only a phone call away).

So my conclusion:
1. Don't be afraid using Linux (particularly Linux Mint which is very easy) - if you run into a problem search the Internet with a quote of the error message or problem description. Narrow down the search if necessary, by adding "linux mint" or "ubuntu" to the search phrase (Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu, so most solutions that work for Ubuntu will also work for Linux Mint). Chances are you'll find an answer.

2. If you can't find an answer to the problem, open a thread under the relevant category. Provide some information about the computer and Linux installation you've got, as well as a problem description and error messages / logs. If you don't know how to describe the problem or where to find relevant information to narrow down the issue, just do your best to provide a meaningful post. Most likely someone will jump in with specific advice on how to provide more information, or what to do next. There are lots of knowledgeable people here that are able and willing to help.

3. In time you will become an expert, like many here.


I completely agree with this. I have had an easier time finding answers and fixing problems with Linux (I run Linuxmint 14 Nadia, MATE) than I ever had with Windows. Granted, you have a command line driven operating system to learn, but if you are anything like me, the challenge is fun. Sometimes things work like a charm, other time, not so much. However, every error you are allowed to make with Linux expands your knowledge where Windows just wants you to do things (read: everything) their way.

These forums are a treasure trove of information. I have found more interesting solutions to problems and/or issues here, and some from newbies.

So, I totally agree with the above assessment, don't be afraid of Linux (it really doesn't bite). When performing a search on the Internet use Linuxmint or Linux X (your distro like 13), there is a lot of knowledge out there. Linux is an ongoing project. It is constantly changing and flowing. You can always questions, too, but like the above states: put in some info about your system and what the problem is if you can't find anything relevant to your issue. And, gradually, you too will be an expert like the wonderful people on this forum :)
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby songtothesirens on Sat Apr 06, 2013 8:34 am

grey1960envoy wrote:believe me learning Linux is actually easy if you have fun and are open to a bit of learning . The number one thing to remember is do a lot of reading and actually FORGET what using windoze is like as you will find Linux DOES NOT work like WINDOZE .Never has Never will! I myself am a recent escapee from M$ and neither my wife nor I miss the old days of defragging , AV scans etc. etc.etc.A very good idea is to read the forums and get hold of online Ebooks like "Complete Linux Tutorial" and go to the library ,borrow a book called "Linux For Dummies"or even better purchase it.BTW Mint is very user friendly .



As a fairly new Linux Mint 14 user (i have tried other Distros in the past, but kept going back to Windows, ick, because I needed something only Windows could run, then I learned about Wine, never mind), I think that picking up some free or relatively inexpensive eBooks on Linux is a good idea. I have a couple from Amazon for Kindle that only cost about $3.00. The for For Dummies book is only about $20.00, and there is one that I really want about Ubuntu (on which Mint is based) which runs about $30.00. I would recommend that if you have a Kindle or a Nook or Sony or whatever eBook reader to pick up some cheap "command line" books. They are not expensive, and can be a great deal of help. Some are designed to be like work books where they give a script to build and you build it and see what happens :)

But, seriously, Linux rocks over Windows, however, be prepared to forget everything you know about computer OS's (is that a word?). Linux is really different. You have control over your computer, and can configure your machine to suit you, not trying to make a rigid system like Windows or Mac work like you want it too. That just gave me a headache, so I decided that Microsoft was for the birds, and I am using Linux and quite happily learning all I can.

Most software is free and is constantly being improved on by development teams unlike Windows stuff where the "latest non-free" package does nothing but fix the bugs of the last version, and creates new ones. The whole idea behind Linux is that it is the end user (you) that has control over what your machine needs to be. It is not pre-fabricated in the same sense that Windows and Mac are. You have control, software is free and opensource so as you get more familiar with things, you can tweak software packages to make them suit you. It seems that whereas Apple and Microsoft are all about profit margins, Linux is about people, sharing ideas, working together, and coming up with some brilliant stuff. But, mostly Linux is about the relationship between the user and their machine (sorry, i have a sentient computer named HAL), and how you, the user, wants to use your machine, not theirs (ie: Windows).

There is a wealth of information in the forums. Some of the people here are brilliant with their solutions and workarounds. They are beautiful and elegant, and usually simple. There is even more out there on the Internet. Use Google. Make it your friend. You will use it a lot.

Oh, and I found that learning basic commands like "apt-get install", "apt-get update", "apt-get upgrade" was really useful, along with "sudo" or "su" which will put you into "superuser" mode allowing you nearly complete access to the inner workings of your machine. Also, get familiar with the "Synaptic Package Manager." A very helpful tool.

I picked up some eBooks for reasonable prices at Amazon: "Beginning the Linux Command Line" has been helpful, also, "Tweeting Linux" has configuration commands written in 140 words or less, so it keeps it simple, "The Linux Mint Beginners Guide" by Jonathon Moeller is also helpful, and there are a few others I consult a lot..... "Ubuntu: an absolute beginners guide" by Courtney Loo, "Learning Line Commands" by Vishal Shukle was heldful (and cheap), "The Linux Command Line Beginner's Guide" by Jonathan Moeller was very helpful. So, as you can see there is tons of information out there. If you want paperback versions of these books, I would recommend used online bookstores like half.com, alibris.com, and abebooks.com. Much less expensive than the bookstore counterpart.

Okay, since I have now written a book singing the praises of Linux, I recommend you read, try out the tutorials in the books, online where ever you find them, try stuff, if it works great, if it doesn't, you can usually back out of it, sometimes you break your machine in which case you have to reinstall, but that's no big deal, just a pain. Happy hunting, learning and computing! Remember if you get frustrated, there is an answer out there. (Sounds all X-files).

Anyway, welcome to the wonderful, wide world of Linux :)
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby songtothesirens on Sat Apr 06, 2013 9:13 am

Wouter_db wrote:There is a shift going on. You may have noticed, especially if you're into computing for some years, that with every new version of an commercial OS (Also OS's of smartphones, tablets etc) that you'll get less and less options to change stuff, and that the core of the system is being shielded from you. You are presented with in effect an 'GUI-over-an-GUI', where you are only allowed to change stuff like wallpapers, install some 'safe' apps and such and alter minor stuff. Windows XP for example is the last MS OS ever to run in that way, with most options readily available.

MS, and pretty much every commercial developer are trying really really hard to eliminate free choice, because having us 'fool around' is bad for predictability, and that is the holy grail. Users neatly guided on well trodden paths like cattle makes for excellent predictability in terms selling more stuff to us to feed our short term gratification.
Don't be fooled, look closer to most new developments (like the 'secure UEFI', Windows 8 touchfocus and Metro and so many other 'handy features for our benefit'), and you will see the drive for CONTROL. And the future of commercial OS's are only going further in streamlining the 'user experience' until no on knows anymore how computers really work (today's whatsappping smartphone kiddies anyone?).


In short, Linux is WORTH every single bit (lame pun) of your time, and that includes cursing and swearing trying to fix stuff. Because Linux has a FREE future where you still learn-by-doing how you want stuff to work for YOU, not some corporations sales.


I have noticed that over the years, but didn't really see it until you pointed it out. I have been using Windows since 3.1 was all the rage with its sort of GUI based interface (but don't ever lose that link to "main" or you will not be able to access anything) to Windows 8 which was one of the biggest jokes.....it was like having a smartphone on my computer and you really could not change much of anything. I think there were like three things you could change (being sarcastic, but it really was that bad), Vista took 1 GB of RAM just to run..... my grievances go on and on. The last Windows installation that I liked and was stable was XP. However, Linux Mint 14 Nadia is stable, and I can change anything I want to (for the most part, some stuff I just will not mess with, yet.) The O/S is free, open source, constantly being improved upon, the software does the same thing as the vastly more expensive Windows based applications (ie: it is freeware, which all software ought to be, or at least shareware), you, the end user, are in control of your machine. You "design" it to suit how you use it not some predefined idea of how a person ought to use a computer. I am rambling.

Anyway, for serious newbies, i would suggest reading, reading, and more reading along with hands on trying stuff out. Amazon has a good number of fairly inexpensive eBooks on Linux, and I would bet that Barnes and Noble does too for the Nook. Get familiar with the "sudo" command (but recognize this makes you a superuser, and you can break your system in this capacity, then you have to either fix it, or reinstall), get familiar with the "apt-get" command; you'll use it a lot to update packages, to install packages, start learning what the different options are that can be used with commands such as "ls" which will list everything in a directory, beware of the "autoremove" command; I used it once because Linux said after an update that I did not need these packages any more......some were dependencies for other programs, and i couldn't figure out a way to back out of it, hence, re-install, but mostly, have fun, be nice to your machine, resist the urge to chuck it in the road when nothing seems to be working, be calm, and enjoy the learning curve. All the information you need is here in the forums, out there on the Internet, and in fairly inexpensive books. If you do not have an eReader like Kindle or Nook, try these online used bookstores: half.com, albris.com, and abebooks.com. But, mostly have fun with it, after all, you are in control, not "them."

There's a whole lot more that I have learned by breaking machines, but this post is long enough. Let's just say I have re-installed more than once. Oh, also, find the distro that suits you the best and avoid switching distros every few weeks. I like Linux Mint 14/Nadia and Ubuntu with the MATE desktop. I did not like the Cinnamon desktop.....don't know why. I have tried Linux Mint 12/13/14, Fedora, Ubuntu 12.04/12.10. I like Linux Mint 14. It works for me. Find the one that works for you. There are plenty to choose from.

Happy learning! (From one fairly noob to another) Now, I need to learn to write scripts (yes, I am a geek!)
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby songtothesirens on Sat Apr 06, 2013 9:53 am

jamvaru wrote:have patience with the people in the linux community
they are struggling like you
patience is a valuable commodity
you WILL learn and succeed



I like that advice. When i first tried Linux as an OS a couple of years ago, I got so frustrated that I finally admitted defeat, and returned to Windows (ick.) Now, I realize that I had the wrong distro for me, and that I had little patience for things not working no matter how hard I tried. I was stuck in the Windows mentality that it just works the way it does and you learn within those parameters. Linux is way different, and does require patience, a willingness to learn, and read everything you can, a willingness to "break" your machine and start over, but, in the end, you have created the machine for yourself, the way you use it, not some predetermined notion of what features a user would want in a program (how could they even presume, every user is different.) It is total freedom from the constraints of Windows and Mac OS. You can pretty much customize anything to suit your needs, not a corporation's assumption of your needs. How would they know?

I think, this time around, i have a better understanding of open source, of the "democracy" of computing, of the idea that ideas are meant to be shared not sold for profit (the benefit lies in the designing something that works for you and for others, and sharing that as opposed to keeping it under lock and key). I hope at some point to become as proficient as some of the users on this forum, and be able to write my own scripts, my own little programs to do the things that I want the computer to do.

For the complete newbie:
1) Don't let yourself get overwhelmed, you can find the solution to any problem somewhere.
2) Open your mind to the fact that this is your computer, not theirs.
3) Don't be afraid to try. You might "break" your computer, but you can re-install.
4) Get familiar with the uses of commands like "sudo", "apt-get", "add-apt" , "update", "upgrade", "install" ~ you will use these a lot (beware of "autoremove", I think that command's results are unfixable)
5) Prepare to read, read some more, and research. I recommend getting a notebook just for Linux notes so you can refer back instead of trying to hunt down the information again. Amazon has some good inexpensive eBooks for Ubuntu, command line stuff, etc. the For Dummies is about $20.00, and the Linux Bible will set you back about $27.00, however, there are useful books that are in the $0.99 to $10.00 range. If you don't have a Kindle, most of these books are available in hard copy, but they are more expensive. You can try: half.com, alibris.com, and abebooks.com for used versions of the Linux books.
6) Find a distro you like and are comfortable with. Don't switch out distros every few days. Most, if not all, give you the option to "test" before installing. I like Linux Mint 14/Nadia. i have tried Fedora, Linux Mint 11/12/13 (13 with cinnamon desktop, didn't like so much), and Ubuntu. There are tons of distros, there is definitely one for you.
7) As Jamvaru said: Be patient both with the people in the community and, as a side note, be especially patient with yourself. You will learn and you will succeed, you just have to open your mind to the idea of freedom, democratic use, your machine being truly your machine (this is a garbage in, garbage out set-up), you control what your machine does (this is different than MS Windows that basically assumes all users are alike.....some of us like to tweak things), you have complete freedom to build whatever you need.
8) Everyone was once a newbie, so don't feel like your questions are stupid. Everyone has had to learn, and you do that by asking "stupid" questions. Once you have the basics down, then you can move on to more complicated stuff. So, just remember, everyone here was once a noob, and most, if not all, came from the Windows/Mac mindset. So, open your mind to learning a new way of viewing computing and have fun! It is fun :)
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby InkKnife on Sat Apr 06, 2013 4:12 pm

I think you all are over complicating things.
I switched completely to Linux Mint last year after almost 25 years of mostly using Macs and the switch was easy. I didn't have to learn how to use terminal, everything has worked right out of the box and if anything I think Mint/Cinnamon is easier than OSX in several important ways.
I have helped a few new people get setup on Mint and the only thing I do is give them a brief walk thru of the interface and the only real topic that needs explanation is how the software center is where you go to find new software.
That's it. Mint is slick and easy.
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby menine111 on Sun Apr 14, 2013 5:51 am

dose anyone know how to update from Linux mint 10 to Linux mint 14 in one go could you message me if you know how
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Re: What are your top tips for a Newbie?

Postby InkKnife on Sun Apr 14, 2013 12:55 pm

menine111 wrote:dose anyone know how to update from Linux mint 10 to Linux mint 14 in one go could you message me if you know how

No, there is no upgrade in place option for Mint. You have to do it the old fashioned way, backup and then restore after a clean install.
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