question on upgrade

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emmetk1
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question on upgrade

Post by emmetk1 » Sun Feb 01, 2015 8:49 am

i want to upgrade from mint 16 t0 17.1. is there any way to save firefox password file to migrate over to 17.1?

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karlchen
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Re: question on upgrade

Post by karlchen » Sun Feb 01, 2015 9:27 am

Hello, emmetk1.

The answer is, yes, there is. Actually, there is more than one way to achieve your goal. Here is one way:
  • Before you overwrite your Mint 16, from inside Mint 16, backup the whole Firefox profile.
  • Make sure that Firefox is not runnig. If it is close it.
  • Open a terminal window. Execute this commandline:

    Code: Select all

    cd; tar -cvf ./ff_profile_backup.tar ./.mozilla
    Compress the .tar archive.

    Code: Select all

    gzip ./ff_profile_backup.tar
  • Copy the compressed .tar.gz file to a USB pendrive e.g.
  • Backup further data which you want to keep and which you want to restore on Mint 17.1 later on.
  • Install Linux Mint 17.1 as explained in the Linux Mint User Guide.
  • Before launching Firefox, copy the file ff_profile_backup.tar.gz to your new home folder.
  • Extract the whole .tar.gz folder thus restoring your backed up Firefox profile.
  • Open a terminal window. Execute the following commands:

    Code: Select all

    cd; gunzip ./ff_profile_backup.tar.gz
    tar -xvf ./ff_profile_backup.tar
  • You should now be able to launch Firefox on Mint 17.1, and Firefox should use the restored profile. Firefox may take some time migrating the profile from the older Firefox version on Mint 16 to the recent Firefox version on Mint 17.1. But it should work
Note:
Yes, all the operations for which I gave you the commandlines, can be performed using the graphical file-manager and the archive programme file-roller. Yet, explaining how to do it using the graphical tools would mean much more work for me. This is why I chose to give the commandlines instead.

HTH,
Karl
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DataMan
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Re: question on upgrade

Post by DataMan » Mon Feb 02, 2015 6:02 am

If you're relying on Thunderbird as your mail client, I'd suggest doing the same as described above for Firefox.

-DataMan
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austin.texas
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Re: question on upgrade

Post by austin.texas » Mon Feb 02, 2015 8:10 am

The principle is fairly simple. The configuration files for your programs are the "hidden" files in your home folder. Any file which starts with a . is "hidden". You can see them by enabling "Show Hidden Files" in your File Manager.
You can take a look and see that there are many files there that you might want to preserve, in addition to the Firefox profile. Personally, I have a special theme that I want to preserve for gimp, and I want to preserve some of my other configurations like for mplayer, asunder, grsync, etc. I am sure the same applies to you.
As karlchen said, "there is more than one way to achieve your goal."
You can apply the "tar" method suggested by karlchen to all of the hidden files and folders that you want to keep.
The easiest way to preserve your configuration files is to have a separate /home partition. If you have a separate partition designated as /home, all of the hidden config files are stored on that partition, and they will still be there after you install a new linux to your / partition - as long as you do not format the /home partition during installation. You do have to designate it as /home during installation, but do not format. If you use that procedure, you don't need karlchen's method or any other special technique (other than the standard advice to always have everything backed up somewhere). In that case, you do not need to take any special measures to preserve your config files.
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emmetk1
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Re: question on upgrade

Post by emmetk1 » Fri Feb 06, 2015 7:32 am

there are 2 partitions root and swap.

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karlchen
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Re: question on upgrade

Post by karlchen » Fri Feb 06, 2015 8:00 am

emmetk1 wrote:there are 2 partitions root and swap.
As your home folder is located on the root filesystem /, this will leave you the way I had explained in the very first reply.
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emmetk1
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Re: question on upgrade

Post by emmetk1 » Tue Feb 10, 2015 8:08 am

found another way. took a screenshot and printed it. problem solved.
thx for your help.

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