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Linux Mint based on Devuan at 2019.

Posted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 8:07 am
by Erki
Hello.

Have been using Linux Mint from version 7. Couple of time donated money. I have installed Mint into my old laptop, my desktop, mom desktop, father laptop, ex-wife laptop and desktop, aunt desktop, my new laptop, uncle laptop, brother laptop. A bif fan of Mint or so...

Until systemd came along. Not explaining why, but this is just crossing the line for me. Right now I have time until 2019 april, when 17.3 support ends.

But thank you for Mint based on Devuan at 2019.

Re: Linux Mint based on Devuan at 2019.

Posted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 5:05 pm
by DGMurdockIII
That would be great

Re: Linux Mint based on Devuan at 2019.

Posted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 6:41 pm
by Pjotr
Nah. I like systemd. :mrgreen:

It just works. I'm aware of its theoretical disadvantages because of yesteryear's discussions, but practical quality is the ultimate test. Which it has passed.

Re: Linux Mint based on Devuan at 2019.

Posted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 7:35 pm
by Fred Barclay
Been there, looked at doing it... it's no small task. :) Not only would the devs have to dedicate the time to creating the new release, but they'd have to then bug test and support it for the next 3-5 years, add the infrastructure to support it (new pages on the website, a new subforum here), and so on. It would be very nice as an experiment, but I suspect that even if the devs wanted to do this, it would stretch them too thin.

I'm with Pjotr (I think!) - I'm aware of systemd's flaws and limitations, but it works very well. And everyone (well, almost) uses it, so there's a huge amount of support out there. The other init systems just can't compete in that regard.

Re: Linux Mint based on Devuan at 2019.

Posted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 7:36 pm
by curtvaughan
There are several distros other than Devuan which offer non-systemd alternatives, which I'm sure folks here know. As I'm primarily a desktop user these days, I don't care in an emotional fashion as long as the systems work well for me. I do like tinkering with some of the non-systemd alternatives just to observe the workings over time and try to compare in a practical way. Mx Linux has been quite successful in putting out a Debian based desktop system sans systemd by default. If I was a server farm administrator, I'd be a bit more careful in how using systemd or sysvinit might affect my overall reliability. I understand that systemd has gained overall prominence among the Linux crowd over the last 4 years, a phenomenon that rather amazes me. The wheel has largely been reinvented as per Redhat, so there you go.