How to install with manual partitioning

Write tutorials here
There are more tutorials here http://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial/welcome
Forum rules
Please don't add support questions to tutorials,start your own thread in the appropriate sub-forum instead. Before you post please read this
Mal_Hil
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 43
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2014 12:29 pm
Location: England

Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby Mal_Hil » Sat Jul 29, 2017 12:53 pm

I did a google search on manually partitioning LM - and found this.

Is there a newer one - I think it would be useful to be pinned at top.

I managed to do it - but I think it could do with updating to LM 18 ???
Mal - in UK
Linux Mint 18.3 - 64k - with Cinnamon - HP Envoy 15 Notebook, Intel i5

User avatar
wutsinterweb
Level 4
Level 4
Posts: 462
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2017 2:14 am
Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby wutsinterweb » Mon Sep 18, 2017 1:02 am

Could the need to also create an efi partition when using a windows dual/multiboot and efi BIOS be included in this tutorial?

For those that haven't dealt with what I have, on the systems I've installed on that used a motherboard BIOS that was EFI based and IN the BIOS EFI was enabled, or Windows in the EFI system was already installed, I've had to, in manual install, during the install setup and creating the /, the /home, the /swap partitions either creating if it wasn't there, or placing IN the EFI partition, after setting the other 3 partitions, the bootloader.

Also, I've learned the hard way, especially IF you are using an SSD for OS booting but a MHDD for data/programs/ectetera, only having the SSD (or the MHDD you wanted) connected that will accept the OS plugged into the motherboard, I've had real headaches when I didn't do so.

I'm open to discussion on the merits or lack of on those issues.
I want to learn!

Jlvs2run
Level 2
Level 2
Posts: 85
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2015 11:16 pm

18.2 goes to a black screen and won't boot

Postby Jlvs2run » Fri Dec 08, 2017 2:00 pm

I did this but 18.2 goes to a black screen and won't boot. I've posted a support question here.
Linux Mint 18.2 64 xfce / acer aspire 5734z laptop
Linux Mint 17.2 64 xfce / biostar a870u3 mb / amd am3 athlonII x2 regor250 3.0ghz / 8gb ddr3 1333 / geforce 210 32bit ddr3 video card /

SoapyMint
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2017 1:36 pm
Location: UK - Portsmouth

Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby SoapyMint » Fri Dec 15, 2017 11:08 am

xenopeek wrote:You can mount it pretty much anywhere you want, /mnt/disk2 is just an example.


I too am a bit puzzled by the naming why not just "/disk 2" then where did the /mnt originate ?
Linux virgin: Attempting 18.2 "Sonya" - Xfce (32-bit) on Samsung NC10:1.6 GHz Intel Atom N270 processor 533 MHz, 2GB RAM virgin 120GB SSD replaces original HDD.

User avatar
karlchen
Level 18
Level 18
Posts: 8031
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2011 7:21 am
Location: Germany

Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby karlchen » Fri Dec 15, 2017 1:19 pm

SoapyMint,

you are free to shoot your own foot. Nonetheless let me tell you that filenames, foldername, mountpoint names (which are foldernames indeed), enclosing space characters are a good way of making life more complicated. Let go of such Windowish vices.
So you might name the mount point /disk2 or /disk_2.

Not putting objects in the top root level folder / directly, but putting them in the folder /mnt instead, is a good way of keeping your root folder / as clean as possible. Also putting mount points in /mnt consistently makes it easier to check which mount points exist. But you do not have to use /mnt.

Karl
Image
Old bugs good, new bugs bad! Updates are evil: might fix old bugs and introduce no new ones.

User avatar
wutsinterweb
Level 4
Level 4
Posts: 462
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2017 2:14 am
Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: How to install with manual partitioning

Postby wutsinterweb » Fri Dec 15, 2017 3:19 pm

I agree, having had to flee from Redmond products, I honestly do NOT want empty spaces treatment to change in GNU/Linux, it's bad practice from Windows and the Linux way makes much more computint sense.

Whenever someone asserts that they want Linux to be more like Windows I want to say, then go back to Windows, GNU/LInux is NOT Windows and that is expressly how it should be. I don't mean to be unkind, but as one learns the hows and whys of Linux system and structure, it tends to make sense. Of course, you can use quotation marks, but it's bad practice, like leaving your unattended idling car alone to be stolen.

GNU/Linux != Windows and that isn't because of an 133t attitude, there's good purpose in why it is so.
I want to learn!


Return to “Tutorials”