Installing and Using Clip Studio Paint on a Linux Tablet (HP Spectre x360)

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wolf_brigade
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Installing and Using Clip Studio Paint on a Linux Tablet (HP Spectre x360)

Post by wolf_brigade » Sat Jul 22, 2017 5:17 pm

This is a guide I decided to write and share with anyone who wishes to do the same as I did. I hope you will find it useful :)

I will start by saying that I love Clip Studio Paint and I think it is THE most advanced drawing software out there so I am grateful for all the great work done by the CELSYS development team. My only complaint about it is that I cannot install it natively on my favourite operating system; Linux !

However, the Linux community is very resourceful and if there is a will, there is a way :D

Below are the software and hardware details that I have used for this guide:

Operating System:
===================

Windows 10 64-bit (originally installed on the machine)
Linux Mint 18.2 XFCE 64-bit (installed later on the machine)

Hardware:
==========

Hewlett-Packard Spectre x360 13-ac002na
13 inch FHD IPS multi-touch screen
Intel Core i7 7500U CPU
Intel HD Graphics 620 GPU
8 GB RAM
512 GB Solid State Drive
HP Active Pen included (N-Trig technology like the Microsoft Surface Pen)

I chose Linux Mint because it is very easy to install and provides a very complete out of the box experience after installing it. I highly recommend installing version 18.2 or higher because it will recognise all the hardware components on your machine straight away.

I chose the HP Spectre x360 because it is a laptop/tablet convertible that comes with a pen so you can use it to draw like you would on a Wacom Cintiq. It is also a very Linux friendly machine so most things will work after installing it.

It is up to you how you would install Linux on the machine. You can either create a Linux/Windows dual boot or you can completely erase Windows and replace it with Linux. I went for the second option because I have no need for Windows on my machine.

If you wish to install Linux then you have to go through a couple of stages:

Update your BIOS firmware
==========================

The HP spectre x360 has a well known problem where the fan will keep running even when no applications are running and it can overheat very easily. Updating the BIOS firmware fixes this issue. This has nothing to do with Linux but fixing it before installing Linux is a good idea.

(1) Go to the HP Drivers and Software official website (https://support.hp.com/us-en/drivers/)

(2) Type [13-ac002na] and click the find button. This should take you directly to the product page

(3) Select [Windows] from the [Operating system] drop-down menu

(4) Select [Windows 10 (64-bit)] from the [Version] drop-down menu

(5) Click the [Change] button. This should display the list of available drivers/firmware

(6) Click the [BIOS] section heading. This should reveal the BIOS update file

(7) Click the [Download] button

(8) Save the file in a suitable place on your hard drive

(9) Go to where you saved the file

(10) Double click on the file. This will start the update installation process

(11) Follow the installation instructions and everything should just go well


Disable Secure Boot in your BIOS
=================================

You need to disable the Secure Boot feature in your BIOS to enable installing other operating systems like Linux on your machine.

(1) Shut down the machine

(2) Press the power button

(3) Quickly and repeatedly press the [F10] key. This should take you to the BIOS setup options (Aptio Setup Utility from American Megatrends)

(4) Use the [right arrow] key to navigate to the [System Configuration] tab

(5) Use the [down arrow] key to navigate to the [Boot Options] option

(6) Click the [Enter] key

(7) Use the [down arrow] key to navigate to the [Secure Boot] option

(8) Click the [Enter] key

(9) Use the [down arrow] key to navigate to the [Disabled] option

(10) Click the [Enter] key

(11) Use the [down arrow] key to navigate to the [USB Diskette on Key/USB Hard Disk] option in the [UEFI Boot Order] section

(12) Click the [F6] key until that option becomes the first option in the list

(13) Click the [F10] key to save your changes

(14) Click the [Enter] key when the [Yes] option is highlighted. This should restart you machine.


Create a Bootable Linux USB Flash Drive
========================================

The easiest way to install Linux is to create a bootable USB flash drive.

(1) Download the Linux Mint 18.2 XFCE 64-bit ISO file from the official website (https://linuxmint.com/edition.php?id=242) and save it in a suitable place on your hard drive

(2) Download the portable version of the [Rufus Application] from the official website (https://rufus.akeo.ie/) and save it in a suitable place on your hard drive

(3) Follow the steps in this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMzUv44Vngo). I would recommend keeping the default value of [MBR partition scheme for BIOS or UEFI] in the [Partition scheme and target system type] drop-down menu.


Create a Linux/Windows Dual Boot Setup
=======================================

This will allow you to have both Windows and Linux on your machine

(1) Follow the steps in this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1XqHFgpqxc).

OR

Delete Windows and Install Linux Mint
======================================

Do this if you only want to have Linux on your machine

(1) Follow the steps in this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxAZXHxxYQo).


Once you have Linux installed, log into it and connect to your WiFi network. The next sections describe the stages needed to install and configure Clip Studio Paint.


Installing WINE
=======================================


(1) Open the XFCE Terminal

(2) Execute the command: wget -nc https://repos.wine-staging.com/wine/Release.key

(3) Execute the command: sudo apt-key add Release.key

(4) Execute the command: sudo apt-add-repository 'deb https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/ubuntu/ xenial main'

(5) Execute the command: sudo apt-get update

(6) Execute the command: sudo apt-get install --install-recommends winehq-staging

(7) Reboot the system

(8) Open the XFCE Terminal

(9) Execute the command: winecfg

(10) Click [OK] when a dialogue window appears asking you to grant wine permission for downloading and installing a suitable Mono package

(11) Click [OK] when a dialogue window appears asking you to grant wine permission for downloading and installing a suitable Gecko package

(12) Reboot the system


Installing winetricks
=======================================


(1) Save the following file in your Downloads folder (~/Downloads) using the name "winetricks": https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Winet ... winetricks

(2) Open the XFCE Terminal

(3) Execute the command: cd Downloads

(4) Execute the command: chmod +x winetricks


Installing Clip Studio Paint 1.6.2
=======================================


(1) Download the Windows installer from the official website (http://www.clipstudio.net/en/purchase/trial) and save it in your Downloads folder (~/Downloads) using the name "CSP_162ENw_setup.exe"

(2) Open the XFCE Terminal

(3) Execute the command: sudo apt-get update

(4) Execute the command: sudo apt-get install cabextract

(5) Execute the command: cd Downloads

(6) Execute the command: ./winetricks

(7) Check the radio button for [Select the default wineprefix] then click the [OK] button

(8) Check the radio button for [Install a Windows DLL or component] then click the [OK] button

(9) Check the checkbox for [vcrun2005] then click the [OK] button

(10) Accept all the default settings in the dialogue windows that will appear (including the winetricks warning about wine bugs 30713, 37781)

(11) Repeat steps 8 to 10 for the following DLLs in the order they are listed in:
vcrun2008, vcrun2010, vcrun2012, vcrun2013, vcrun2015, vcrun6, vcrun6sp6, msxml4, msxml6, mfc40, mfc42

(12) Exit winetricks by clicking the "Cancel" button twice

(13) Reboot the system

(14) Open the XFCE Terminal

(15) Execute the command: winecfg

(16) Click the [Staging] tab

(17) Check the boxes next to the options to enable CSMT, VAAPI and EAX

(18) Click the [OK] button

(19) Execute the command: wine CSP_162ENw_setup.exe

(20) Accept all the default settings in the installation dialogue windows that will appear.

(21) Reboot the system

(22) Open Clip Studio Paint

(23) Click the [File] menu

(24) Select the [Preferences...] option

(25) Select [Interface] from the left hand pane

(26) Click the checkbox in the [Touch Operation Settings] section

(27) Click the [Large] button

(28) Click the [OK] button

(29) Restart Clip Studio Paint. The touch interface should now be active


Configuring the Active Pen
=======================================


(1) Open the XFCE Terminal

(2) Execute the command: xfce4-mouse-settings

(3) In the Mouse and Touchpad settings window, click the [Device:] drop-down menu

(4) Make a note of the pen ID number (for example 04F3:22E1 Pen)

(5) Close the Mouse and Touchpad settings window

(6) Execute the command: cd /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d

(7) Execute the command: sudo nano 10-evdev.conf

(8) Comment the [MatchIsTablet] line in the file by adding a # at the start of the line

(9) Press CTRL + O to save the file

(10) Press CTRL + X to exit the file

(11) Execute the command: sudo nano 50-wacom.conf

(12) add "| 04F3:22E1 Pen" in the [MatchProduct] line of N-Trig section of the file

(13) Press CTRL + O to save the file

(14) Press CTRL + X to exit the file

(15) Reboot the system


The next sections describe the stages needed to make the make the icons, menus and panels larger in size. This will make using Linux Mint in tablet mode more comfortable.

Enlarging the Whisker Menu and its Icons
==========================================


(1) Right click on the Whisker Menu

(2) Select [Properties] from the context menu

(3) In the Properties window, select the [Large] option from the [Item Icon Size:] drop-down menu

(4) In the Properties window, select the [Large] option from the [Category Icon Size:] drop-down menu

(5) Click the [Close] button

(6) Click the Whisker Menu

(7) Click and drag the top right hand corner of the menu until it reaches a reasonable size suitable for touch operation


Enlarging the Size of the XFCE Panel
===================================================


(1) Open the XFCE Terminal

(2) Execute the command: xfce4-panel --preferences

(3) In the Panel window, change the value of the [Row Size (pixels):] slider to a higher value like 70 or 80

(4) Click the [Close] button


Enlarging the Notification Area Icons
==========================================


(1) Right click on an point between any two icons in the notification area of the XFCE panel (this is a bit tricky so you might need to try many times before you manage to get it)

(2) Select [Properties] from the context menu

(3) In the Properties window, change the value in the [Maximum Icon Size (px):] field to 64

(4) Click the [Close] button


Enlarging the Fonts
===================================================


(1) Open the XFCE Terminal

(2) Execute the command: xfce4-appearance-settings

(3) In the Appearance window, click the [Fonts] tab

(4) Click the [DPI] checkbox

(5) Increase the value next to the [DPI] checkbox to a higher value like 150

(6) Click the [Close] button

Enlarging the Desktop Icons
==========================================


(1) Open the XFCE Terminal

(2) Execute the command: xfdesktop-settings

(3) In the Desktop window, click the [Icons] tab

(4) Change the value in the [Icon Size:] field to a higher value like 60

(5) Click the [Close] button

Enlarging the File Manager Icons
==========================================


(1) Open the XFCE Terminal

(2) Execute the command: thunar-settings

(3) In the File Manager Preferences window, click the [Side Pane] tab

(4) Select the [Large] option from the [Icon Size:] drop-down menu in the [Shortcuts Pane] section

(5) Select the [Normal] option from the [Icon Size:] drop-down menu in the [Tree Pane] section

(6) Click the [Close] button

(7) Execute the command: thunar

(8) In the File Manager window, press and hold the [Ctrl] key then click the [+] key

(9) Repeat the previous step until you get a large enough icon size


Enlarging the Window Title Bars
==========================================


(1) Open the XFCE Terminal

(2) Execute the command: xfwm4-settings

(3) In the Window Manager window, click the [Style] tab

(4) Select the [Default-xhdpi] option from the [Theme] pane

(5) Click the [Close] button


That is it folks. Thank you for reading this far and I hope this will be useful to all you artists/Linux enthusiasts out there. I would also like to thank Clément Lefèbvre and his team for all their great work in making this masterpiece operating system (and also to all the great folks at Canonical, Debian, XFCE and the Linux Kernel team).
Last edited by wolf_brigade on Tue Jul 31, 2018 3:04 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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ArtGirl
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Re: Installing and Using Clip Studio Paint on a Linux Tablet (HP Spectre x360)

Post by ArtGirl » Tue Aug 29, 2017 2:38 pm

Thank you for taking the time to post such clear and helpful instructions. :)
18.3 Mate 64bit
Radeon R9 255, Mesa 17.2.8, 4.15.0-13,
Lenovo x310, intel i7-4790, 16 ram,
Ugee 2150


For any advice I've been able to add, eg re graphics tablets, please search forum.

Image

wolf_brigade
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Re: Installing and Using Clip Studio Paint on a Linux Tablet (HP Spectre x360)

Post by wolf_brigade » Tue Aug 29, 2017 4:25 pm

You are very welcome :D

Pascal Illustrator
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Re: Installing and Using Clip Studio Paint on a Linux Tablet (HP Spectre x360)

Post by Pascal Illustrator » Mon Jul 30, 2018 7:30 am

Thank you for this article.
But if you use Wine on Linux, doesn't that mean that it's NOT natively?

I'm an illustrator and Clip Studio Paint is my favorite drawing software. I use a dual boot machine with Windows 10 and Linux Mint.
I'm still use Windows for Clip Studio Paint. I was thinking about wine, but read that it had some safety problems.

wolf_brigade
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Re: Installing and Using Clip Studio Paint on a Linux Tablet (HP Spectre x360)

Post by wolf_brigade » Tue Jul 31, 2018 2:55 pm

Now that I think about it, I suppose my wording was not accurate. When I said "native", I meant that you are installing it on Linux Mint itself instead of inside Windows within a virtual machine inside Linux Mint. Using the virtual machine approach is, of course, an option but the performance you get will probably make Clip Studio Paint unusable. That is why I recommend using the wine approach (at least until CYLSYS realises that there is an active community of users for their software within the Linux community and they begin releasing Linux binaries for their software. I don't think that is a hard thing to do since their software is written in C++ and porting C++ programmes to Linux is not that hard).

As for the security risks, I admit that they exist but if you are a vigilant Linux user who takes the necessary precautions when browsing the net or reading emails then the risks are minimal. I have been using it for a long time now but I never experienced any security issues.

On a related note, I also hope that the developers of Krita will start adding more features to it to bring it closer to the functionality of Clip Studio Paint. The two features that are currently missing in Krita which are preventing me from using it as a replacement for Clip Studio Paint are:

1) No Vector eraser functionality
2) No touch functionality for working with it on tablets

Pascal Illustrator
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Re: Installing and Using Clip Studio Paint on a Linux Tablet (HP Spectre x360)

Post by Pascal Illustrator » Sun Aug 05, 2018 9:31 am

Thank you.
For me a good add to Krita would be:
- a zoom tool instead of a slider.
- possibility to make pen-paths and turn them into selections like Photoshop.

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