SSD and dual boot linux mint 16

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yoann_bra
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SSD and dual boot linux mint 16

Post by yoann_bra » Fri Jan 10, 2014 7:37 pm

Hi Everyone,

I've been testing the linux mint 16 as a live usb and I've been enjoying it a lot. I'm planning to do a clean install of linux mint 16 with windows 7 on a ssd.
I have a configuration with a ssd of 128 Gb, HDD of 640 Gb and 8 Gb of ram.

Do you guys have any tips about partitionning? It seems that I will not need a swap partition with 8 Gb of ram. What about the temp and var folder?

I'm willing to use the HDD as the home folder with my document. Do I have to do that during the instalation or it's after?

I found a link relating ssd tweaking (https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/ssd), as a newbie I'm having a hard time identifying what is really necessary to do and not so necessary tweaking. I would be glad to have an advice about it.

Thank you in advance for any answer!

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austin.texas
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Re: SSD and dual boot linux mint 16

Post by austin.texas » Fri Jan 10, 2014 8:02 pm

I'm willing to use the HDD as the home folder with my document. Do I have to do that during the instalation or it's after?
The usual way to do it is to designate the partition you want to use as /home on your HDD as part of the installation procedure.
What about the temp and var folder?
I am not aware of any special need for a separate /temp and /var, not unless you didn't have a lot of room in / - then you might put those on the HDD. But with a 128 GB SSD you are OK on space. 12 or 13 GB for / is plenty unless you are going to download lots of different kernels, themes, massive programs, etc.
It seems that I will not need a swap partition with 8 Gb of ram
If you have a laptop you will need 8 GB of swap for hybernation. That can be on the HDD
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Derek_S
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Re: SSD and dual boot linux mint 16

Post by Derek_S » Fri Jan 10, 2014 10:59 pm

Hello yoann_bra - I'll link you to a post I did a couple of days ago for another forum member. Please read this first : http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=90&t=155474
And then follow the advice on these links:

Partition alignment on SSD drive: http://www.thomas-krenn.com/en/wiki/Partition_Alignment

Optimize Windows 7/8 on SSD drive: http://www.thessdreview.com/ssd-guides/ ... 8-edition/ (Please note: 5 pages in all)

Optimize Linux on SSD drive: http://apcmag.com/how-to-maximise-ssd-p ... -linux.htm

I think the most important thing is planning how to partition the SSD drive. Be aware you will have to strike a balance between the space needed for Windows 7, the root partition of Mint, and unallocated space (over-provisioning) for garbage collection and wear leveling. I would recommend the following: 10% to 20% for over-provisioning (12GB to 24GB), then 12GB to 24GB for the root partition of Mint, and then use the balance for Windows 7. Naturally, you would want to install Windows first, get it up and running, shrink C:/ partition, then create the root partition for Mint, and leave the unallocated space at the end of the drive for over-provisioning. Pay attention to partition alignment when you install Windows, it should align itself to the 1MB boundary when you install it, just be sure to double check this before proceeding with partitioning for the root of Mint.

On the SATA drive, you could move the paging file for Windows there after the Windows install and turn off hibernation in Windows. Then create the swap space for MInt, making it equal to system memory. You don't really need this for swap, but you will need it to suspend Mint. Then create a Home partition for Mint, and maybe leave room at the end of the SATA drive for data storage for Windows. Planning is very important, I always lay things out on paper first, not just diagrams and numbers, but also the sequence of steps I plan to follow. Read the links I provided, it covers what should be done before and after the installation of both Windows and Mint. Good luck - Derek.

Note: Edited for errors in grammar; content was not changed
Last edited by Derek_S on Sat Jan 11, 2014 4:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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yoann_bra
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Re: SSD and dual boot linux mint 16

Post by yoann_bra » Sat Jan 11, 2014 3:13 pm

Thank you both for your response. I will plan all this on paper and then get my hand dirty! I will try to share my workflow with other. It could be interesting to add a ssd instalation part in the linux mint instalation manual.

yoann_bra
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Re: SSD and dual boot linux mint 16

Post by yoann_bra » Fri Jan 17, 2014 9:40 pm

Thanks to your help I've a perfectly smooth experience on both windows 7 and linux mint 16. I've made some changes following my personnal use (do not use swap partition) For people needing a draft of the different steps:

Pre installation :
Backup files on the ssd, list softwares
Wipe ssd using linux mint live usb : tool gparted, create an empty ntfs partition for all the ssd drive

Install windows 7
Install windows 7
shrink c partition (before windows 7 partition let room for linux mint /home, after windows 7 partition let room for overprovisionning 25 gb for my ssd of 128 gb (20%))
check partition alignment : http://www.thomas-krenn.com/en/wiki/Partition_Alignment

Linux mint instalation
-/home partition not installed on the hard drive because existing windows folder, the /home partition is automatically put on the root partition : « / », see lstep 0 of linux optimisation for sharing of document between windows and linux
-root partition «/» on the ssd (40 gB) use ext4
-swap on the sata drive, size of the memory (ram : 8 gb) not created (do not need hibernation, suspend is used or shut down)
-portion of ssd unallocated for over provisionning (10-20%) représente 25 gb necessity of over provisonning: http://www.myce.com/review/what-a-diffe ... pproach-2/)



Optimize windows 7
http://www.thessdreview.com/ssd-guides/ ... 8-edition/

Alignment (normally not necessary after a clean install)
http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2011/09/ma ... rformance/

Optimize linux mint :

0) Share linux and windows document/download/pictures/videos etc : http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/35807/ho ... nd-ubuntu/

Steps here : http://apcmag.com/how-to-maximise-ssd-p ... -linux.htm
1.) Enable Trim - see the section under "Filesystem Layer"

sudo nano -w /etc/fstab
/dev/sda   /   ext4   noatime,nodiratime,discard,errors=remount-ro 0 1
!!! do not put the discard : http://blog.neutrino.es/2013/howto-prop ... d-dmcrypt/


Follow this procedure for trim:

http://www.mabishu.com/blog/2012/12/14/ ... d-systems/

Weekly : sudo nano /etc/cron.weekly/batched_discard

#!/bin/sh
LOG = /var/log/batched_discard.log
echo "*** $(date -R) ***" >> $LOG
fstrim -v / >> $LOG
fstrim -v /home >> $LOG


2.) Optimize Read/Write Speeds - see the section under "Scheduler"

sudo nano -w /etc/rc.local
echo deadline >/sys/block/sda/queue/scheduler

For Ubuntu and other distributions using GRUB2 (yes linux mint is using grub 2 : to know command line : grub-install -v, edit the /etc/default/grub file and add 'deadline' to the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT line like so:
 
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash elevator=deadline"
 
Then run 'sudo update-grub2'.

3.) Minimize Unnecessary Writes - see the section under "Swap and Temp" 

 If you have a purely SSD system and lots of memory, you can disable swap almost entirely. Keep a swap partition available, but add the following to your /etc/rc.local file:
 
echo 0 > /proc/sys/vm/swappiness
 
And Linux won't use swap at all unless physical memory is completely filled.

Next, to reduce unnecessary writes to the SSD move the temp directories into a ram disk using the 'tmpfs' filesystem, which dynamically expands and shrinks as needed. 

In your /etc/fstab, add the following:
 
tmpfs   /tmp       tmpfs   defaults,noatime,mode=1777   0  0

tmpfs   /var/spool tmpfs   defaults,noatime,mode=1777   0  0

tmpfs   /var/tmp   tmpfs   defaults,noatime,mode=1777   0  0
 
If you don't mind losing log files between boots, and unless you're running a server you can probably live without them, also add:
 
tmpfs   /var/log   tmpfs   defaults,noatime,mode=0755   0  0


4.) Move the chromium cache files to the SATA drive - see the section under "Applications"

No clear response... /complicated

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