How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

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irfanhrt
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How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by irfanhrt »

I have a Windows 7 now with three partitions in my laptop(C,D and F). My hard disk is of 500 GB and almost 460 GB available for use. My partition is as follows for windows C= 25 GB free of 60 GB, D=150 GB free of 200 GB and F= 204 GB free of the 204 GB. Now i want to install Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon as dual boot. I have a Lenovo B490 laptop. I want my D and F drive have to be Common for both Mint and windows. That means i want to access these two drives in both OS.
Kindly please help me to understand how it can be done during the installation of the Linux Mint 13. I don't Know how to select a correct partition type during the time of installation.
Please help me.

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kukamuumuka
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by kukamuumuka »

Just do not select automatic installation. When doing a manual partitioning, set a mount point for a common partition like /mnt/common
Dual Boot Linux Mint 13 & Windows 7
PS. Select ntfs filesystem for a common partition.

If you add a common partition after installation, it goes like this:
1. Make a mount point

Code: Select all

sudo mkdir /mnt/common
2. Add a mount poit to the /etc/fstab file

Code: Select all

gksudo pluma /etc/fstab  ## you can use your favorite editor of course
... an example a common partition /dev/sda7

Code: Select all

/dev/sda7 /mnt/common ntfs-3g defaults 0 0
... of course you can use UUID instead of /dev/sdxy
3. Mount the partition

Code: Select all

sudo mount -a

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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by Mark Phelps »

Kindly please help me to understand how it can be done during the installation of the Linux Mint 13.
That's NOT the time to be messing around with automatically mounting NTFS partitions. You have enough to get working during installation, as is.

You are likely to have problems with video drivers, audio drivers, and networking drivers. You need to get all of those working properly before you tackle mounting NTFS partitions.

Once you do get the other stuff done, though, the way to automount NTFS partitions is by adding lines to /etc/fstab.

The linked page provides you the details: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Mount ... artyNTFS3G

irfanhrt
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by irfanhrt »

@ administrollaattori.
Thanks for your reply. But friend I am no at all well versed with the technical terms at all. It would be better if you give a step by step direction. I got your first part that to select manual partition and to choose common partition in that partition table. Can you make it clear that what would be the next step.

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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by Derek_S »

Hello irfanhrt - Before anyone can advise you what to do, you must provide a clearer picture of how your disk is currently partitioned. There is over 30GB of disk space you did not account for in your description (60+200+204=464, not 500) and I suspect a partition or two is missing as well. Here's what I suggest, start Windows, then open the Control Panel. Select "All Items", then "Administrative Tools", and then "Computer Management". On the left panel, select "Storage", then open "Disk Management". Now you will see your partition table. Press the "Windows" key and the "prt sc" key and take a screenshot. Close all open apps and open your "Pictures" folder, you will find a new folder inside named "Screenshots". Post the image here, so that everyone, including yourself, is aware of how your disk is partitioned and the best way to change it.

Also, why do you need the two partitions, D and F, which total just over 400GB (80%!) of your hard drive, for shared data? You're leaving your current operating system, Windows, and your planned operating system, Mint, with very little room on the disk. If you install applications you will soon find yourself running out of room. When it comes to disk partitioning, planning is done first and planning is everything. Post the screenshot here so we can better advise you, otherwise we are all taking shots in the dark.
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by jahid »

just shrink one of the two partitions (D or F) with gparted and make a new partition or two partitions (if you want your home directory in another partition).
make those new partitions as ext4. as D & F are both in ntfs (i am assuming they are both ntfs, if fat that works too) you don't have to do anything at all to make them common to both OS.
when installing system:
mount point for one partition : /
mount point for two partitions : / (for system) & /home (for home)
partition type: ext4 (for both)
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by kukamuumuka »

irfanhrt wrote:@ administrollaattori.
Thanks for your reply. But friend I am no at all well versed with the technical terms at all. It would be better if you give a step by step direction. I got your first part that to select manual partition and to choose common partition in that partition table. Can you make it clear that what would be the next step.
Common partition for every system when installing Linux Mint

irfanhrt
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by irfanhrt »

Derek_S :
Hi as u said I am attaching the screen short of my disk partition. Actually i want to use Linux Mint regularly. But i would like to access all my data in both OS. That why i want a common partition.
Attachments
screenshort.jpeg

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austin.texas
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by austin.texas »

It appears that you have Drive D, and the new volume, which are both almost empty right now, both about 200GB.
You only need a 20 GB partition where you can install Mint - if you are using the data partition as /home.
You can backup any data you have on those 2 partitions (Windows calls them "drives", but they are not).
Then create a 15 to 20 GB partition for linux as "Drive D" (some of these partitions will have to be logical partitions, not primary partitions)
Use all the rest of the space, about 380 GB for your data partition. Create an 8 GB partition after that for your linux swap partition (8 GB or equal to the ram you have)
When you install linux, use the Something Else option that you will see, and tell it to use the 20 GB partition as / and the 380 GB partition as /home, and the 8 GB partition as /swap. You will see how to make those designations in the installation program.
Here is a guide for installation:
http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=122276
The 380 GB partition will have to be formatted as NTFS so that Windows can use it, as well as Mint.
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mbohets
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by mbohets »

Hi,

When looking at your screenshot, it seems that all of your diskspace is already used by the windows partitions.
So I would delete the new 204G partition and make your D drive bigger, for example 350G, in that way you will have about 50G left on you disk for linux.
The D drive will be accessible from linux and from windows, so that will be your common data drive.

When you start the mint installer, you need to choose manual disk setup, so you can choose yourself how to organise your disk.
manual disk setup 1.png
After that, you will see the disk layout
manual disk setup 2.png
To make your windows drives accessible from linux, you need to select each one of them separately and click on the change button under the partition list
At that moment, a popup appears with the details of that partition,
select ntfs in the use as selection box
Certainly do not select format, otherwise you windows drive will be wiped !!!!
The mountpoint box indicates where in you linux file system the windows drives will be mapped/
You can for example use /WindowsCdrive and /WindowsDdrive as mountpoints so you can easily see what they are.

The next step is to define the new linux partitions / , /home and swap
To do that, you will have to click on Add button (next to the change button you just used).
You will again get a popup. (you will need to create 3 extended partitions)
Fill in ext4 in the use as box, and / in the mountpoint box, use 20G for this partition
Fill in SWAP in the use as box, there is no mountpoint, use 4G for this partition
Fill in ext4 in the use as box and / home in the mountpoint box, use the rest of the free space for this partition

If you are sure you got filled it in right, you can go on with the installation and click the install now button.
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austin.texas
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by austin.texas »

mbohets wrote:Fill in ext4 in the use as box and / home in the mountpoint box, use the rest of the free space for this partition
This will not work - Windows cannot read a ext4 partition, /home has to be NTFS.
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mbohets
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by mbohets »

In this case /home is not ment to be accessible from windows, it is only used to store linux personal settings of the linux applications.
The drive where the user can store data, documents, music, ... that needs to be common between windows and linux is his windows d: drive, which is accessible both from Windows and Linux.

I don't think it would be a good idea to format your /home partition in ntfs format, because ntfs does not support the more extended linux access rights and the way to make hidden files by preceding them with a dot, as most personal settings files use.
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austin.texas
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by austin.texas »

mbohets wrote:In this case /home is not ment to be accessible from windows, it is only used to store linux personal settings of the linux applications.
I don't think it would be a good idea to format your /home partition in ntfs format, because ntfs does not support the more extended linux access rights and the way to make hidden files by preceding them with a dot, as most personal settings files use.
good point. You are correct. In which case, setting up a separate /home is not at all necessary. A 20gb / partition with no separate /home would work fine.
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irfanhrt
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by irfanhrt »

mbohets:
Thanks for your help. I have two more doubts now. First, why should i shrink my existing F drive and merge it with D drive. Can i have both these drive as it is now and common to both OS? Second, while doing partition on that pop up window there is a selection called "primary" or "Logical". which one i have to select?

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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by jahid »

select Logical (primary partitions have some limitations that logical don't).
you don't need to merge with D drive. just make a partition large enough to meet your need in linux and install linux mint in that partition.
you can make this partiton by shrinking either of your drive D or F.
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by austin.texas »

First, why should i shrink my existing F drive and merge it with D drive.
The answer to that question has been given multiple times in this thread - for example this comment by mbohets
"it seems that all of your diskspace is already used by the windows partitions.
So I would delete the new 204G partition and make your D drive bigger, for example 350G, in that way you will have about 50G left on you disk for linux.
The D drive will be accessible from linux and from windows, so that will be your common data drive."
My opinion is that you only need a 20gb partition, at most, where you can install Mint. You will be storing your personal files on the big common data partition.
If you don't like the idea of merging them to create one big data partition, you can certainly just shrink one of them to make a partition for Mint.
Second, while doing partition on that pop up window there is a selection called "primary" or "Logical". which one i have to select? You do need to know the difference between primary and logical partitions.
On any computer with MBR partitioning, you are only allowed to create 4 primary partitions. One of those can be an extended partition which can contain more partitions known as logical partitions. So the extended partition is generally just a container which contains the logical partitions. The partition table in your MBR records the information the computer needs to read about your primary partitions. The information about your logical partitions is not kept in the MBR, it is in a more vulnerable and more unstable location. But, still, there are situations where you need some logical partitions.

Before you make your decisions about the partitions, I think it would help to get some better information about the existing partitions. That screenshot just doesn't display everything we need to know.
Please boot your live Mint DVD or usb, open a terminal with Ctrl-Alt-t and enter the command
sudo fdisk -l
and post the result.

Also, you should have a complete backup/restore copy of your Windows installation before making partition changes.
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irfanhrt
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by irfanhrt »

Thanks Friends. Finally I could install the Linux Mint as i wish. But now these two drives D & F are showing like a folder icon in the Linux Mint, Not like the Drive Icon. Will it make any difference? I made these partitions as NTFS during the installation of the Linux Mint. The other Drives which i kept Untouched are showing in the Drive Icon....... Any Problem?

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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by austin.texas »

But now these two drives D & F are showing like a folder icon in the Linux Mint,
As I mentioned before - Windows calls them "drives", but they are not, they are partitions. Linux shows all mount points as "folders".
The other Drives which i kept Untouched are showing in the Drive Icon....... Any Problem?
No problem.
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irfanhrt
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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by irfanhrt »

One More Doubt...... If I use a Pen drive with Virus and copies the data in it to any one of these drives by using Linux Mint, then whether that virus will execute in Windows?

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Re: How to do a common partition for both Mint and Windows.

Post by irfanhrt »

Hei Friends Help me.... Just Now I noticed this problem. I couldnt find the data which i added to these folders(windowsDdrive & WindowsFdrive) using linux mint is not showing in windows. And all the data that i copied in to my D Drive is lost after a restart..... what shoul i do?

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