Gparted only allowing 4 primary partitions [solved]

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briholt
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Gparted only allowing 4 primary partitions [solved]

Post by briholt » Mon May 26, 2014 9:59 pm

So, I'm trying an experiment that started a while ago. I want to first install linux mint, and then install windoze 8.1

My previous attempt failed, I think because when I initially set up the partitions (seen at this thread: http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=90&t=157402 ) I wasn't in full UEFI mode with CSM disabled.

So, I've got a clean 500 gig hard drive that I am using gparted to partition.

This would be the general goal of my partition scheme:

Code: Select all

    lsblk -f
    NAME   FSTYPE LABEL MOUNTPOINT
    s                 
    ├─s1              /boot/efi ...........(550 mib)
    ├─s2              ........................(ntfs, 100 gib)
    ├─s3              /.......................(ext4, 30 gib)
    ├─s4              /home...............(ext4, whatever is left gib)
    └─s5              ........................(linux swap, about 24 gigs (I've got 16 gigs of ram )
    unallocated         ........................(20.71 mib)


But when I ran Gparted to make this scheme, it squawked at me saying I couldn't have more than 4 partitions, which is a MBR things, not a UEFI thing.

Any ideas why this wouldn't be working? I've got my current linux in Hard drive #1, and my blank Hard drive as #2. I ran Gparted from Hard drive #1, not live DVD.


[solution]
As noted below, the solution was that I forgot to first set up a partition table...
Last edited by briholt on Wed May 28, 2014 2:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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kyphi
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Re: Gparted only allowing 4 primary partitions

Post by kyphi » Mon May 26, 2014 10:44 pm

That is correct. You can only have 4 primary partitions on any hard drive. Alternatively, you can have 3 primary partitions and 1 extended partition and you can divide the extended partition into as many logical partitions as you have room for. Boot must be on a primary partition.

http://www.ehow.com/info_8067560_primar ... tions.html

CSM? Did you mean GPT (GUID Partition Table)?

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-gpt/

I would install Windows first :( because Windows will overwrite any boot sectors it finds. Linux is more accommodating and will fit in without changing the Windows boot. Ideally, put Windows on a separate drive - sort of like in quarantine.

You really do not need a 24 GB swap file - 2 GB would be ample. In the days when computers were equipped with small amounts of RAM, say 500 MB, the rule to make the swap file twice as big as the RAM installed made sense. This is no longer the case.
Linux Mint 19.2 Cinnamon - 64bit

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Derek_S
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Re: Gparted only allowing 4 primary partitions

Post by Derek_S » Mon May 26, 2014 11:32 pm

Hello briholt - I think the reason you're having a problem is because you skipped a step. Open Gparted, then select the correct disk (sda, sdb, sdc, etc.) from the right side tab. Once you have the right disk, click "Device" at the top of the screen. Then select "Create Partition Table". On the small pop-up menu that appears, you will see "msdos" as the partition type (which is actually mbr). Click this tab, go up two spots on the menu and select "gpt", then click "Apply". Voila, you have a fresh GPT disk to work with. Then it's a matter of creating your new partitions on the lower table.

As kyphi has already mentioned, I think you will be better off if you install Windows first. Windows will probably wreck things as far as booting Mint, and also due to Microsoft's unwritten policy "All your disk are mine!" :x . After installing Windows, I suggest using Windows Disk Management to shrink Windows' C:/ partition to make the necessary room for Mint, rather than using Gparted. After doing so, you can then use Gparted to create your Linux partitions in the unallocated space.
"When you rise in the morning, give thanks for the light, for your life, for your strength. Give thanks for your food and for the joy of living. If you see no reason to give thanks, the fault lies in yourself." - Tecumseh

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briholt
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Re: Gparted only allowing 4 primary partitions

Post by briholt » Tue May 27, 2014 6:54 pm

Derek_S wrote:Hello briholt - I think the reason you're having a problem is because you skipped a step. Open Gparted, then select the correct disk (sda, sdb, sdc, etc.) from the right side tab. Once you have the right disk, click "Device" at the top of the screen. Then select "Create Partition Table". On the small pop-up menu that appears, you will see "msdos" as the partition type (which is actually mbr). Click this tab, go up two spots on the menu and select "gpt", then click "Apply". Voila, you have a fresh GPT disk to work with. Then it's a matter of creating your new partitions on the lower table.

That did it. I can now have more than 4 primary partitions as expected. Thank you for your help!


Derek_S wrote:As kyphi has already mentioned, I think you will be better off if you install Windows first. Windows will probably wreck things as far as booting Mint, and also due to Microsoft's unwritten policy "All your disk are mine!" :x . After installing Windows, I suggest using Windows Disk Management to shrink Windows' C:/ partition to make the necessary room for Mint, rather than using Gparted. After doing so, you can then use Gparted to create your Linux partitions in the unallocated space.
Yes, yes, but remember this is an experiment.

When I built my new machine I did not yet have windows 8.1. I knew that it needed a GPT partition table, that UEFI had to be the only bootable otptions, and that the CSM had to be disabled, all because it doesn't operate like an MBR boot system.

I needed a computer to work, so I install linux first, knowing full well that I"d like to have windows too, but like I said, I didn't have it yet. So, I got to a place where I could obtain windows, and had trouble installing it, despite the help from users spearmint2 and gold_finger.

I eventually concluded that the first time I formatted the hard drive, I must have done something wrong preventing me from installing windoes 8.1 despite having the partition table laid out above: that despite having created a GPT disk, I might not have had all the bios settings set to UEFI only, and so for some reason windows would not install.

I'm seeing if I can try this again, doing everything right, and whether I can get windows to work.

So, yes, windows first is easier. This is just for pure stubborn curiosity.

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