Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Questions about Grub, UEFI,the liveCD and the installer
Forum rules
Before you post please read how to get help
Hungry Jack
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2015 6:58 pm

Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Hungry Jack »

I am trying to boot Mint 17.1 from a USB drive that I have configured with Mint.

My Dell Dimesion 3000 (2.8 GHz 1 MB RAM) BIOS does not allow me to specify my USB port as part of the boot sequence. Thus I cannot boot up on Linux.

Forgive my limited knowledge. Any suggestions greatly appreciated.

User avatar
Derek_S
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1278
Joined: Sat Dec 28, 2013 5:36 pm
Location: Long Island, N.Y.

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Derek_S »

Hello Hungry Jack and welcome to the Linux Mint forum. I took a look at Dell's support website and found the manual for the Dell Dimension 3000. Here's a cut and paste that should help you out.

Appendix 85 - Boot Sequence - This feature allows you to change the boot sequence for devices.

Option Settings -

•Diskette Drive — The computer attempts to boot from the floppy drive. If the floppy disk in the drive is not bootable, if no floppy disk is in the drive, or if there is no floppy drive installed in the computer,the computer generates an error message.

•Hard Drive — The computer attempts to boot from the primary hard drive. If no operating system is on the drive, the computer generates an error message.

•CD Drive — The computer attempts to boot from the CD drive. If no CD is in the drive, or if the CD has no operating system, the computer generates an error message.

USB Flash Device — Insert the memory device into a USB port and restart the computer. When F12 = Boot Menu appears in the upper-right corner of the screen, press <F12>. The BIOS detects the device and adds the USB flash option to the boot menu.
NOTE: To boot to a USB device, the device must be bootable. To make sure your device is bootable, check the device documentation.
"Truth is becoming rarer and rarer as time passes. It is only a matter of time before it will cease to exist."

seawolf167
Level 4
Level 4
Posts: 205
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2014 2:02 am

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by seawolf167 »

As a fallback, since your computer has a cdrom drive, you can always use that, though I can't see a reason that your Live USB wouldn't work based on what Derek_S posted above.

User avatar
Derek_S
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1278
Joined: Sat Dec 28, 2013 5:36 pm
Location: Long Island, N.Y.

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Derek_S »

seawolf167 wrote:As a fallback, since your computer has a cdrom drive, you can always use that, though I can't see a reason that your Live USB wouldn't work based on what Derek_S posted above.
Hello seawolf167 - I don't mean to be critical, but you meant to say DVD drive, correct? A CD drive won't work because a CD's data capacity is just 700MB, about half of what is needed to burn one of the current 1.4GB Linux Mint .iso files. I think this is why Hungry Jack is trying to use a USB flash drive in the first place.
"Truth is becoming rarer and rarer as time passes. It is only a matter of time before it will cease to exist."

seawolf167
Level 4
Level 4
Posts: 205
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2014 2:02 am

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by seawolf167 »

Derek_S wrote:
seawolf167 wrote:As a fallback, since your computer has a cdrom drive, you can always use that, though I can't see a reason that your Live USB wouldn't work based on what Derek_S posted above.
Hello seawolf167 - I don't mean to be critical, but you meant to say DVD drive, correct? A CD drive won't work because a CD's data capacity is just 700MB, about half of what is needed to burn one of the current 1.4GB Linux Mint .iso files. I think this is why Hungry Jack is trying to use a USB flash drive in the first place.
Yeah, you're correct. I forgot how big the LM iso is compared to other distros.

Hungry Jack
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2015 6:58 pm

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Hungry Jack »

Derek and Wolf,

Thank you for your help. The procedure worked fine.

Unfortunately, I failed to launch. I received a message posted in challenging-to-decipher script across the top of my screen to the effect of "Only detected on ??? 64 CPU but only on ? i686 CPU...Use a kernal application."

This Dimension has a 32 bit processor, and it looks like I goofed and downloaded the 64 bit version. Duh.

EDIT: And now it's running smoothly. Thanks again for the help!

NEW QUESTION: Would/Should I expect better performance if I install Linux to the hard drive vs. running it off the USB? My biggest issue at the moment is slow video playback in Mozilla (might be a Flash version issue). Mainly watching recruiting videos of high school football players on Hudl.com.

Also, is browsing on Linux a much more secure platform than XP?

User avatar
Derek_S
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1278
Joined: Sat Dec 28, 2013 5:36 pm
Location: Long Island, N.Y.

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Derek_S »

Hello Hungry Jack - In answer to your latest questions, you can expect better overall performance from Linux Mint when it's installed to your hard drive versus running a "live CD session" from a USB flash drive. When you run a live session, you're using a portion of your system's memory to load the OS, and in light of the fact that your machine has just 1GB of system memory to begin with, you're asking quite a lot from it by playing streaming video on top of that. When you install LM to the hard disk, you're freeing up the memory that's needed to run a live session, and your streaming video should improve. Just keep in mind that other factors, such as the source of the video stream and the overall amount of internet traffic at the time also affects streaming video.

As far as security goes, you're already aware that support for Windows XP ended in April of last year, and you've probably been looking for a good replacement ever since then. Linux Mint does come with a firewall already installed (ufw), but you need to install the graphic front end (gufw) from the repository if you want to make any configuration changes. Firefox is the installed browser, and if you take the time to configure it properly, you shouldn't have any problems with using it (I myself prefer Firefox to Internet Explorer). One thing you don't need to be concerned about is anti-virus or anti-malware software, since the overwhelming majority of malware is designed to attack Windows based systems. I've read that any anti-virus software designed for Linux actually does nothing to protect the Linux OS that it's installed on - it's real purpose is to catch any Windows-based viruses contained in email attachments or shared files so that they are not passed on to Windows systems. So in this respect, Linux can act as a carrier that remains unaffected by the disease but cannot become the host.

If you're unsure about taking the plunge and eliminating Windows XP altogether, you should consider installing LM17.1 to dual boot with Win XP. This way you can test Linux Mint and still have Win XP to fall back on if you run into any problems. If you decide to do this, post back and I can walk you through it.
"Truth is becoming rarer and rarer as time passes. It is only a matter of time before it will cease to exist."

Hungry Jack
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2015 6:58 pm

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Hungry Jack »

Derek,

You are mighty generous with the offer of instructions on the dual boot. It's really tempting to drop XP altogether and go with Linux, but I probably should go with the dual boot option.

I have about 43GB in free space, which I assume is plenty. Can I successfully partition the drive and install Linux without reformatting it? I have a backup WD disk drive for my data, plus some stuff on GDocs. So I am probably good to go.

ivtec
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 21
Joined: Mon Nov 18, 2013 2:12 pm

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by ivtec »

Hungry Jack wrote:Derek,

You are mighty generous with the offer of instructions on the dual boot. It's really tempting to drop XP altogether and go with Linux, but I probably should go with the dual boot option.

I have about 43GB in free space, which I assume is plenty. Can I successfully partition the drive and install Linux without reformatting it? I have a backup WD disk drive for my data, plus some stuff on GDocs. So I am probably good to go.
Do not get rid of win xp, you can run both, after you install linux OPS you type in terminal sudo apt-get update then sudo apt-get update-grub,
if you can't install mint 17.1 just install Xubuntu 14.04 it will work,
I also have a Dell Dem 4500 and i couldn't install Mint 17.1 but Xubuntu 14.04 runs perfect,and i run win XP and Xubuntu well,i boot system and it gives me the choice of booting in Linux or Win XP,i only use Win XP for Trusted Web streaming and trusted applications,there a few applications that don't run on Linux that only run on Win so it's very handy,but you have top disable win updates in the win control panel, you can leave firewall on though.


(Can I successfully partition the drive and install Linux without reformatting it?)


If you have WinXp already installed all you have to do is install Linux along side Win XP,it will partition it for you, and then when you have Linux Installed and updated you type in terminal sudo apt-get update-grub and that's it.

User avatar
karlchen
Level 21
Level 21
Posts: 12799
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2011 7:21 am
Location: Germany

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by karlchen »

Hello, ivtec.

The commands are

Code: Select all

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade
(update-grub does something totally different.)

Cheers,
Karl
Last edited by karlchen on Tue Jan 20, 2015 8:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Thanks to the user who pushed my nose on the (incorrect) command "sudo apt-get update-grub"
Image
Linux Mint 19.3 64-bit Cinnamon, Total Commander 9.51 64-bit
Haß gleicht einer Krankheit, dem Miserere, wo man vorne herausgibt, was eigentlich hinten wegsollte. (Goethe)

ivtec
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 21
Joined: Mon Nov 18, 2013 2:12 pm

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by ivtec »

karlchen wrote:Hello, ivtec.

The commands are

Code: Select all

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade
(update-grub does something totally different.)

Cheers,
Karl
what you're talking about bro? He wants to get rid of win xp and i told him not to, and advised if he has win installed then install linux along side winxp and then use terminal sudo apt-get update and then sudo apt-get upgrade -grub,that's the way i have win xp and Linux installed in same HARD DRIVE.

User avatar
Derek_S
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1278
Joined: Sat Dec 28, 2013 5:36 pm
Location: Long Island, N.Y.

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Derek_S »

Hello Hungry Jack - All right, let's get started. I think it would be best if we divide this into two seperate posts, part #1 dealing with preparation and part #2 dealing with installation. Let's begin with preparation. (I admit that I haven't used WinXP in quite a while, so please correct me if I'm wrong about anything)

1.) ***You can skip this step if you have your Windows XP installation CD*** I'm pretty certain that you can create a startup repair or boot CD from Windows XP. If you can, then please do so. However, if you cannot, then you can download Hiren's Boot CD from this link: http://www.hirensbootcd.org/download/
The Hiren's .iso file is contained inside the .zip file. Once you extract the files, all your have to do is burn the .iso to a CD. There are tools on Hiren's that allow you to repair the boot sector and get Windows working again. You probably won't need it now, but in the future, if you ever decide to delete or reformat the root partition of LInux Mint, the odds are you will not be able to boot WinXP afterward. Then you're dead in the water with no working OS. It's far better to have a boot CD and not need it rather than need a boot CD and not have it.

2.) You mentioned having 43GB of "free disk space". Just to be certain we're both on the same page, I'm going to show you two screenshots. Please tell me which one applies in your case.

In this first screenshot, Windows C:\ partition extends all the way to the end of the disk and has about 95GB of "free disk space" inside the partition.
Number Two.PNG
In the second screenshot, Windows C:\ partition does not occupy the entire disk and there is roughly 63GB of "unallocated" disk space following it.
Number One.PNG
Now, if I remember correctly, the Disk Management program in Windows XP is not capable of either extending or shrinking disk partitions, which is exactly what you'll need to do if your current C:\ partition extends to the end of the drive, like in screenshot #1. But first, you should defragment C:\ drive and move as much data as possible to the front of the drive. After you do this, you can boot into a live CD session of Linux Mint and use Gparted to shrink your Windows C:\ partition. Because I have no clue how large your hard drive is overall, how large the Windows C:\ partition currently is, and how much data you already have on C:\, you'll need to excercise good judgement and use a bit of caution here as well. Keep two things in mind: If you can come up with 30GB of unallocated space on the disk, it's more than enough to install Linux Mint. At the same time, you do not want to overdo it when you shrink C:\, because Windows can get very cranky when C:\ is at 90% or less of it's capacity. For example, if you have 80GB of data on C:\, then 88-89GB is the absolute minimum size for C:\ drive, and you really should make it larger (like 100-120GB) to allow room for any data added in the future.

Once you boot into a live CD session and open Gparted, carefully examine the lower panel and be absolutely certain you are looking at the correct device (it would help not to have any external drives connected to avoid any confusion). If you need to, you can use the button on the right side to toggle between /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, /dev/sdc, etc. Once you are certain you have the correct drive displayed, find the Windows C:\ partition. Click on the line where it's displayed, and you'll see a small menu appear. What you want to select is "Resize/Move". Now a new window will appear showing a bar representing the partition, and below that the free space preceeding, the new size, and the free space following. What I do is "grab" the right edge of the bar and slide it to the left. When I get close to the new size I want, I use the up/down arrows on the box marked "New Size" to adjust the amount exactly to where I want it. Here's an example where I'm shrinking my own C:\ partition from 78GB down to 48GB(or 49152MB):
Screenshot from 2015-01-20 21_00_39.png
Remember, you have to work in MB and 1GB = 1024MB. So in your case, take the current size of C:\ that's first shown in "New Size", then subtract 30720MB(or 30GB) to arrive at the new size you want. Note - You should also see 30720MB appear in the "free space following" when you do this. Make sure that "free space preceeding" remains at 0.

Once you get everything to where you want it, click the "Resize/Move" button. Nothing will happen at this point. You need to go up and click the "Edit" button, then click "Apply All Operations". NOTE - If you have any second thoughts, you can click "Undo the Operation" and start over. When the operation completes, you should see 30GB of "unallocated" space appear below C:\ partition in the lower panel. Now you have the room needed to install Linux Mint.

Before you exit Gparted, I want you to take note if there are any other partitions on the drive besides the Windows C:\ partition. The answer to this will determine how we use Gparted to create and format your new Linux partitions prior to installation. Now you can exit Gparted and shut down the machine.

It's getting late here and I need to get some sleep, I have an early day tomorrow. Please post back with any questions you have up to this point as well as the number of partitions on the disk. I'll get back to you tomorrow. - Derek
"Truth is becoming rarer and rarer as time passes. It is only a matter of time before it will cease to exist."

User avatar
Derek_S
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1278
Joined: Sat Dec 28, 2013 5:36 pm
Location: Long Island, N.Y.

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Derek_S »

Hello Hungry Jack - Are you still with us? Are you ready to proceed? I'm waiting for you to give me the O.K. before I post the instructions for installation.
"Truth is becoming rarer and rarer as time passes. It is only a matter of time before it will cease to exist."

Hungry Jack
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2015 6:58 pm

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Hungry Jack »

Derek_S wrote:Hello Hungry Jack - Are you still with us? Are you ready to proceed? I'm waiting for you to give me the O.K. before I post the instructions for installation.
Derek,

My apologies. Swamped with work and a 4 year old. I hope to partition the drive this weekend.

Thanks!

User avatar
Derek_S
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1278
Joined: Sat Dec 28, 2013 5:36 pm
Location: Long Island, N.Y.

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Derek_S »

Hungry Jack wrote:Derek,

My apologies. Swamped with work and a 4 year old. I hope to partition the drive this weekend.

Thanks!
All right. I didn't mean to rush you. I was in the same situation during the two weeks leading up to the holidays. I was only concerned that something unfortunate happened to your machine.
"Truth is becoming rarer and rarer as time passes. It is only a matter of time before it will cease to exist."

Hungry Jack
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2015 6:58 pm

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Hungry Jack »

Derek,

Sorry I was absent for so long. I uploaded my music to Google Play and had some issues, since resolved.

I hope to resume the process. I think I need to defrag the drive, which I will do, then start on the boot CD.

...

User avatar
Derek_S
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1278
Joined: Sat Dec 28, 2013 5:36 pm
Location: Long Island, N.Y.

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Derek_S »

Hello Hungry Jack - I went back and re-read this thread to refresh my memory, here's a reminder of what you should do prior to installation: 1.) If you do not have a Windows XP installation CD available, then download a copy of Hiren's Boot CD and burn it to CD or DVD. Hopefully you'll never need it, but if WinXP ever fails to boot, you'll be glad to have it. 2.) Defragment the Windows C:\ partition in preparation for shrinking it by 30GB. This will give you the unallocated space needed to install Linux Mint without taking too much away from Windows XP. 3.) In light of the fact your system has 1GB of installed memory, I would suggest that you think about installing LM17.1 with either the XFCE desktop or the MATE desktop. The Cinnamon and KDE desktops require more memory resources to run and could lead to system crashes under certain conditions.

Now onto installation. Start by booting your system with your LM17.1 installation media, then make your internet connection so you don't forget later on. Go to the Menu and find Gparted. Once you open it, examine the partition table that is displayed there and verify that you have the correct device. If not, use the button on the right side to toggle between /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, and so on. Once you have the correct device, right click on the line for the Windows C:\ partition and select "Resize/Move". Take the current size of C:\ that's shown in "New Size" and subtract 30720MB(or 30GB) to arrive at the new size you want, then replace the current size with the new size you've calculated. Note - You should see 30720MB appear in the "free space following" box when you do this. Also be sure that the "free space preceeding" box remains at 0. Once you are certain all the amounts are correct, go down and click the "Resize/Move" button. Sit back and be patient since this operation can take some time to complete. Once it's finished, the partition table will be refreshed and show 30720MB of unallocated space following the Windows C:\ partition.

Now right click the line for the unallocated space and select "New". In the panel that appears, you must enter the size of the new partition and the file system you want to use. First, you need to create your Linux swap partition. Select "Linux swap" as the file system. For the size, I suggest using 2048MB(2GB), twice your system memory. Then click "Add", and your new swap partition will appear in the panel. Next, you will create your root partition. Select "ext4" as the file system. You can use the rest of the space that is left on the disk. If you wish, you can enter "Root" as the label. Then click "Add", and your new root partition will appear. Now go up and click "Edit" and "Apply All Operations". This is the step that actually creates your new disk partitions. Before exiting Gparted, there are two more things to do. Right click the line for Linux swap and in the sub-menu that appears, click "swap on". I do this before running the installer so that it recognizes the swap partition. The last thing is this: take one last look and write down the device labels (sda2, sda3, etc.) that are used for your swap and root partitions, you will need this information when running the installer. Now you can close Gparted.

Now start the installation. Go through the initial steps. When you reach the "Installation Type" screen, go to the bottom and select the "Something Else" option. This will allow you to "flag" your root partition so the installer recognizes it as such. On the next screen, Installation, you will see a small partition table. Start by finding the line for your root partition (remember what you wrote down?), click on it to highlight it, then go down and hit the "Change" button. On the small pop-up screen that appears, click the "Use As" button, and select ext4 as the file system. Next, check the "Format" box. Then click "Mount Point" and select " / " - the root symbol. You are done with root at this point and can click the "OK" button. Now root is properly flagged for installation. One thing remains here, go to the bottom of this screen and select the "Device for boot loader installation". Make sure not to use any of the choices that contain numbers. Use sda, sdb, sdc, etc. as long as it is the same device where you installed Linux Mint. Then click the "Install Now" button at the bottom of the page. Then it's a matter of filling in a few more things and letting the installer run to completion.

After installation, you might have problems. If you find that you boot straight into Linux Mint, or you don't see Windows appear in the grub boot menu, then let it boot directly into Mint. Open the Terminal and enter "sudo os-prober". See what the results are. If you see WIndows appear in the output, then enter "sudo update-grub". This should make the necessary changes to grub. Post back if you have problems at this point, or at any point in the process. Take your time and concentrate on what you are doing, and you should have no problems.
"Truth is becoming rarer and rarer as time passes. It is only a matter of time before it will cease to exist."

Hungry Jack
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2015 6:58 pm

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Hungry Jack »

Thanks for the headsup on LM17.1. Will do.

I have about 41G in free HD space, which sounds like plenty.

Now my g*d*** CD door is sticking....ugh.

User avatar
Derek_S
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1278
Joined: Sat Dec 28, 2013 5:36 pm
Location: Long Island, N.Y.

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Derek_S »

Hungry Jack wrote: I have about 41G in free HD space, which sounds like plenty.
Hello Hungry Jack - Please be careful here. Just because you have 41GB of unused space on Windows C:\ partition doesn't mean that you can use all of it. Remember what I said about Windows getting cranky when the C:\ partition reaches 90% or more of it's capacity. For instance, if you have 100GB of data on C:\, then the size of the C:\ partition needs to be 110GB at the very minimum. Please keep this in when you're shrinking Windows C:\, or you'll be in trouble the very first time you attempt to defragment it. Trust me on this, I learned this lesson the hard way back when I was using Windows 98SE.
"Truth is becoming rarer and rarer as time passes. It is only a matter of time before it will cease to exist."

Hungry Jack
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2015 6:58 pm

Re: Dell Dimension 3000 BIOS

Post by Hungry Jack »

I think I will switch the install over to my Dell Vostro, which has 2G of RAM and a functioning DVD drive. Surprisingly, the processor is slower (2.8 GHz vs. 2 GHz), but I think this change will allow my to continue with the Mint install. Make sense?

The HD is 76 GB, with about 64 G free (my data is not on this drive).

If I do this, I should probably install Service Pack 3 for XP before partitioning, right? The Vostro has SP 2.

I have an older WD disk drive for my backup data (along with Google Drive for pics and Music).
- Will LM allow me to access the WD drive and it's data, or should I plan on restoring the vital stuff to the hard disk?
- Will Chrome/GDrive/G Music have any issues running on LM?

Post Reply

Return to “Installation & Boot”