[ABANDON] My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

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fabien85
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by fabien85 »

Hi guys,
I have had the warning

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Warning: /dev/sdb contains GPT signatures, indicating that it has a GPT table.
However, it does not have a valid fake msdos partition table, as it should.
Perhaps it was corrupted -- possibly by a program that doesn't understand GPT
partition tables.  Or perhaps you deleted the GPT table, and are now using an
msdos partition table.  Is this a GPT partition table?
Yes/No?
in the past, and the USB stick was perfectly bootable. The thing is, if I let gparted "correct" the issues, the stick would not be bootable anymore.
So I suggest you write the stick, and not examine it with gparted, just try to boot it straightaway.
I think this happens because a live USB has several tricks to be able to be booted both in Legacy mode and in UEFI mode, so it's not formatted like a standard drive.

Concerning fast boot, it's indeed a firmware (/BIOS) setting on some computers.
People often have a confusion between this and fast startup which is a windows 8/10 feature. If you are dual booting with windows, you DO have to disable fast startup.
For fast boot, I think Mint is compatible with this, but you can try to disable it nevertheless, and once you have a successful install, try reenabling it.

To write an ISO to stick, you can indeed use dd, but if you are not comfortable with command line and find these type of instructions cryptic, I dont recommend it. If you are already using Mint, you can use the application "startup disk creator". Or install unetbootin from the repositories, that's the simplest solution to install it : just open your software manager, search unetbootin and click install, it will install it the good way, with the dependencies if any are needed.

If the stick is not booting on your computer, it may not be the question of having corectly written the ISO, it may be something with your firmware settings. Try booting the stick on another computer.
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by slipstick »

If you look at the USB stick with Nemo, you should see several folders: "boot", "casper", "dists", and some others, plus a couple of files, one of which is "MD5SUMS". You can check the md5 sums of the individual files on the stick as follows:

1. Open a terminal and cd into the directory of the disk or USB stick - for example, to check a LM18 Cinnamon 64 USB stick on my system, I would do:

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cd /media/steve/"Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon 64-bit"
2. then,

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md5sum -c MD5SUMS
You will see a bunch of stuff scrolling past, and then it will appear to hang for a while - just wait a minute or two and it will resume - it should say OK after each file name. I received a warning about 6 files improperly formatted, but I think this is normal and nothing to worry about (the first six in the list). If it passes this test, your USB stick should be good and any boot problems are probably in your BIOS/UEFI.
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by phd21 »

Hi "markfilipak", and anyone else interested in this,

I have been following your post and the good replies to it. Here are my thoughts on this as well.

This is such an easy task to create a USB flash drive stick, or DVD, of Linux Mint using a desktop graphical application. You seem to be over-thinking this, or making this process much more complicated than it is.

The only thing that can be somewhat complicated is verifying the Linux Mint ".iso" file(s) checksum value, and or security signature of the file(s), before creating (burning) a USB flash drive stick or a DVD, and you do not need to do that now, even though it is recommended.

My post on how to verify a Linux Mint .iso file(s)
viewtopic.php?f=42&t=226092&hilit=verify+iso

Once you have downloaded a Linux Mint ".iso" disc image file somewhere on your system, like your "Downloads" folder, to create a Live "Test Drive" demo installation version of Linux Mint, you can use various simple to use desktop applications to create a USB flash drive stick, or DVD of Linux Mint. As far as I know, there are no problems with their live demo installation ".iso" files.

If you are using MS Windows, or Mac, or Linux then you can install & run the simple and easy to use "Unetbootin" USB flash drive stick application using the link below.

"Unetbootin" - just click the link below, then click whatever operating system you are currently using to download and install this simple and easy to use application. If you are using MS Windows, then click the MS Windows button to download the ".exe" file and run it to install it. If you are using Mac, then click the Mac button, download the ".dmg" file and run it to install it. If you have a version of Linux already installed, click the Linux button, and install it using the PPA instructions, or other instructions; FYI: For existing Linux Mint users, the Linux Mint Image Writer (MintStick) application works very well too.
https://unetbootin.github.io/

Once you have "Unetbootin" installed, put a formatted USB flash drive stick (recommend using "Fat32" format) into one of your USB ports, then run the "unetbootin" program, when the screen comes up, enter in your password (if asked), click to select disk image ".iso" near the bottom, then click the button to the far right of that with 3 dots and browse to wherever it is you downloaded the "Linux Mint" .iso disc image file, click the file, then select the USB flash drive stick just below, if it is not already shown, and click ok. During this process when it is writing (creating) the bootable USB flash drive stick, it may appear to be stalled when processing the somewhat large 1.5 gigabyte Linux Mint file, it is working, just wait a little bit and it will continue.

Click link below to view a sample Video of using "unetbootin". My Linux Mint .iso files in this video are on another attached drive, yours will probably be in your local "/Home" and or "/Downloads" folder.

https://youtu.be/1cukiVypLdM


Linux Mint Image Writer (MintStick) - the USB flash drive stick does not need to be pre-formatted with this program.

Click the link below to view a Video showing how easy it is to use the Linux Mint "Image Writer" (MintStick) program to create a bootable USB flash drive stick of any edition and version of Linux Mint from one of their downloaded .iso disc image files.

Start the Image Writer program, on the upper left where is shows "write image", click the button just to the right of that for "Select Image", browse to wherever you downloaded the Linux Mint .iso disc image file, click that file, then on the upper right, click that button (box), to select your USB flash drive stick, click that, then click the "write" button at the lower right, and wait until it is done.
https://youtu.be/bdftv5pRHeQ


Hope this helps ...
Phd21: Mint 19.2 Cinnamon & xKDE (Xfce) & KDE Neon 64-bit Awesome OS's, Dell Inspiron I5 7000 2 in 1, Dell OptiPlex 780 Core2Duo E8400 3GHz,4gb Ram, Intel 4 Graphics. I use KDE?:https://opensource.com/life/15/4/9-reasons-to-use-kde
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by markfilipak »

slipstick wrote:... EDIT - I found the Fast Boot option: "Advanced Memory Settings" -> "Memory Boot Mode"
There are four options on my system: "Auto" (the default), "Normal", "Enable Fast Boot", "Disable Fast Boot". It was set to Auto, so I left it there because it works with that setting. The manual says that Fast Boot will "Skip memory detection and training in some specific criteria for faster memory boot."
Good, slipstick. Where did you find this "Advanced Memory Settings" thingy?

Also, what "manual"? What desktop manager are you using?
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by slipstick »

markfilipak wrote:
slipstick wrote:... EDIT - I found the Fast Boot option: "Advanced Memory Settings" -> "Memory Boot Mode"
There are four options on my system: "Auto" (the default), "Normal", "Enable Fast Boot", "Disable Fast Boot". It was set to Auto, so I left it there because it works with that setting. The manual says that Fast Boot will "Skip memory detection and training in some specific criteria for faster memory boot."
Good, slipstick. Where did you find this "Advanced Memory Settings" thingy?

Also, what "manual"? What desktop manager are you using?
The Advanced Memory Settings is in the BIOS/UEFI setup menu of my computer. If your computer has UEFI, there is likely "Fast Boot" option in your BIOS setup, but maybe under a different menu heading. The manual I referred to is the motherboard user's manual for my Gigabyte GA-Z97X-Gaming 3 motherboard.

I'm using LM 17.3 Cinnamon, 64-bit with the 4.4.0.45 kernel.
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by markfilipak »

FYI, from 'http://wiki.rescatux.org/wiki/RescatuxCannotDo': "There's a bug that makes you think that Fsck went ok when it went wrong. Actually it always says it's ok."
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by slipstick »

Here's a post with something that may be significant:
viewtopic.php?f=46&t=232366&p=1232570&h ... B#p1231716
Many EFIs include a "fast boot" option. When enabled, this feature causes the firmware to take shortcuts in the system's early power-up steps. For instance, USB devices other than keyboards and mice may be left uninitialized. This feature is generally harmless from a Linux perspective, except that you may need to disable it to get a Linux installation medium recognized.
The quote is from the askubuntu link in the post referenced above.
http://askubuntu.com/questions/439555/h ... ot-setting
There are two types of "fast boot" options:

In Windows -- This option, generally called Fast Startup, Hybrid Boot, or Hybrid Shutdown, turns a shutdown operation into a suspend-to-disk operation. As such, it leaves filesystems in an inconsistent state, which means that they will be, at best, ignored by Linux or other OSes. At worst, they'll be mounted and damaged. This makes it imperative that this Windows feature be disabled in any dual-boot scenario. Note that one of the partitions that can be affected by this is the EFI System Partition (ESP), which holds boot loaders. Thus, you can encounter boot weirdness if you don't disable this feature. See here, among other places, for information on how to disable this feature.
In the firmware -- Many EFIs include a "fast boot" option. When enabled, this feature causes the firmware to take shortcuts in the system's early power-up steps. For instance, USB devices other than keyboards and mice may be left uninitialized. This feature is generally harmless from a Linux perspective, except that you may need to disable it to get a Linux installation medium recognized. On occasion, though, the initialization shortcuts may cause devices to malfunction in Linux. The naming of this feature varies greatly from one firmware to another, so it's impossible to tell you precisely where it is or what it's called. Some EFIs don't even have such a feature.
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by markfilipak »

slipstick wrote:Here's a post with something that may be significant:
viewtopic.php?f=46&t=232366&p=1232570&h ... B#p1231716
Many EFIs include a "fast boot" option. When enabled, this feature causes the firmware to take shortcuts in the system's early power-up steps. For instance, USB devices other than keyboards and mice may be left uninitialized. This feature is generally harmless from a Linux perspective, except that you may need to disable it to get a Linux installation medium recognized.
The quote is from the askubuntu link in the post referenced above.
http://askubuntu.com/questions/439555/h ... ot-setting
There are two types of "fast boot" options:

In Windows -- This option, generally called Fast Startup, Hybrid Boot, or Hybrid Shutdown...
I no longer run Windows except WinXP confined to a virtual machine without Internet connection. :wink:
In the firmware -- Many EFIs include a "fast boot" option...
I apparently don't have UEFI. I have an almost-new Lenovo, and it apparently does not have UEFI. This (recently) came as a shock.

Thanks for posting though. It's very kind of you.
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by slipstick »

markfilipak wrote:I apparently don't have UEFI. I have an almost-new Lenovo, and it apparently does not have UEFI. This (recently) came as a shock
It's hard to believe that an almost new computer doesn't have UEFI !!! Maybe you have UEFI running in compatibility mode (also called legacy or BIOS mode)?

Can you paste back the results of

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ls /sys/firmware
to see if you are running in efi mode and don't realize it?
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by markfilipak »

slipstick wrote:
markfilipak wrote:I apparently don't have UEFI. I have an almost-new Lenovo, and it apparently does not have UEFI. This (recently) came as a shock
It's hard to believe that an almost new computer doesn't have UEFI !!! Maybe you have UEFI running in compatibility mode (also called legacy or BIOS mode)?...
Lenovo is not real big on documentation. The user manual doesn't mention UEFI. I have "Legacy" turned off in the BIOS.

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mark@mark-Lenovo-V570 ~ $ ls /sys/firmware
acpi  dmi  efi  memmap
mark@mark-Lenovo-V570 ~ $ 
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by slipstick »

markfilipak wrote:

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mark@mark-Lenovo-V570 ~ $ ls /sys/firmware
acpi  dmi  efi  memmap
mark@mark-Lenovo-V570 ~ $ 
The presence of "efi" there tells me you are booted in EFI mode, so your computer does have UEFI. I would suggest going into the UEFI setup menu and try to find "Fast Boot" and turn it off.
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by markfilipak »

slipstick wrote:
markfilipak wrote:

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mark@mark-Lenovo-V570 ~ $ ls /sys/firmware
acpi  dmi  efi  memmap
mark@mark-Lenovo-V570 ~ $ 
The presence of "efi" there tells me you are booted in EFI mode, so your computer does have UEFI. I would suggest going into the UEFI setup menu and try to find "Fast Boot" and turn it off.
The is no UEFI (or EFI) menu in the BIOS, period.

- Since writing the Mint 18 ISO to USB stick via 'unetbootin', the USB stick doesn't even appear in the BIOS boot selection!
- The USB stick did appear in the BIOS boot selection when I wrote the Mint 18 ISO to USB stick via 'mintstick', but 'mintstick' apparently trashed the USB stick's partition table (as shown in 'gparted'), so it's not surprising that I couldn't boot to it, however, the USB stick WAS listed in the BIOS boot selection (it's just that when I tried to boot from it, I'd get "Error: File '/boot/' not found.").
- Now (since using 'unetbootin'), the USB stick doesn't appear in the BIOS boot selection at all!

I just hate problems with so many moving parts. I hope my documentation is understood. Thanks for your support!

PS: Could the problem be that Mint THINKS I have a UEFI BIOS when in reality, I don't?
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by slipstick »

markfilipak wrote:The is no UEFI (or EFI) menu in the BIOS, period.

- Since writing the Mint 18 ISO to USB stick via 'unetbootin', the USB stick doesn't even appear in the BIOS boot selection!
- The USB stick did appear in the BIOS boot selection when I wrote the Mint 18 ISO to USB stick via 'mintstick', but 'mintstick' apparently trashed the USB stick's partition table (as shown in 'gparted'), so it's not surprising that I couldn't boot to it, however, the USB stick WAS listed in the BIOS boot selection (it's just that when I tried to boot from it, I'd get "Error: File '/boot/' not found.").
- Now (since using 'unetbootin'), the USB stick doesn't appear in the BIOS boot selection at all!

I just hate problems with so many moving parts. I hope my documentation is understood. Thanks for your support!
I wouldn't take gparted's results too seriously. As I posted above, the USB stick that I created with 'mintstick' booted successfully on my computer, yet gparted gave an error message and listed the entire stick as 'unallocated'. There is something about a bootable USB stick that gparted doesn't understand.

The message you are getting "Error: File '/boot/' not found." indicates to me that perhaps the USB stick is not being read - maybe the USB port is not enabled (maybe due to 'Fast Boot' ?).
markfilipak wrote:PS: Could the problem be that Mint THINKS I have a UEFI BIOS when in reality, I don't?
I can't believe that your computer doesn't have UEFI if it is a recent model. And as I understand it, the presence of 'efi' in the /sys/firmware listing means that you are booted in UEFI mode. I don't know what you see when you enter your BIOS setup menu. On my system, the menu is confusing and hard to navigate, even with a printed manual at hand. It might be helpful if you know your motherboard manufacturer and model # and firmware manufacturer to see if you can find an on-line manual. Other than that, I'm out of ideas.
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by AscLinux »

I do not use GUI frontends, never did nor wanted to. They are hiding stuff and sometimes misrepresenting. What file and fdisk commands tell you about your thumb drive? Mine is below.

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file -s /dev/sdh
/dev/sdh: DOS/MBR boot sector; partition 2 : ID=0xef, start-CHS (0x3ff,254,63), end-CHS (0x3ff,254,63), startsector 352, 2880 sectors

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fdisk -l /dev/sdh
Disk /dev/sdh: 1.9 GiB, 2019557376 bytes, 3944448 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x77439d8e

Device     Boot Start    End Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sdh1  *        0 970751  970752  474M  0 Empty
/dev/sdh2         352   3231    2880  1.4M ef EFI (FAT-12/16/32)
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by markfilipak »

slipstick wrote:
markfilipak wrote:The is no UEFI (or EFI) menu in the BIOS, period.

- Since writing the Mint 18 ISO to USB stick via 'unetbootin', the USB stick doesn't even appear in the BIOS boot selection!
- The USB stick did appear in the BIOS boot selection when I wrote the Mint 18 ISO to USB stick via 'mintstick', but 'mintstick' apparently trashed the USB stick's partition table (as shown in 'gparted'), so it's not surprising that I couldn't boot to it, however, the USB stick WAS listed in the BIOS boot selection (it's just that when I tried to boot from it, I'd get "Error: File '/boot/' not found.").
- Now (since using 'unetbootin'), the USB stick doesn't appear in the BIOS boot selection at all!
I AM serious about this. It IS true. I think that there's problems with both 'mintstick' and 'unetbootin' and that there's possibly a problem with Mint (as '/dev/sda2' is 'unclean' and can't be made clean). A bogus EFI setting (in Linux, not the BIOS, which HAS NO EFI menu) could explain all of this.
I wouldn't take gparted's results too seriously.
May I ask: "Why not?"
As I posted above, the USB stick that I created with 'mintstick' booted successfully on my computer...
Well, all I have to do is go over to your house. Got any beers? :lol:
...yet gparted gave an error message and listed the entire stick as 'unallocated'.
After writing with 'mintstick', 'gparted' shows strange partitions, and it doesn't boot. If I use 'unetbootin' to do the writing, 'gparted' is happy, but the USB stick doesn't show up in the BIOS boot device selection. This is a nut-buster!
The message you are getting "Error: File '/boot/' not found." indicates to me that perhaps the USB stick is not being read - maybe the USB port is not enabled (maybe due to 'Fast Boot' ?).
Well now, that's an interesting idea (and thanks for it!). Ummm, but wait. The 'grub' (or whatever is doing the booting) runs. It just can't find '/boot/' (which I've confirmed is actually there!).
markfilipak wrote:PS: Could the problem be that Mint THINKS I have a UEFI BIOS when in reality, I don't?
I can't believe that your computer doesn't have UEFI if it is a recent model.
Nor can I, but from the BIOS screens, that's apparently the situation.
And as I understand it, the presence of 'efi' in the /sys/firmware listing means that you are booted in UEFI mode.
And THERE, I suspect, is the root of the problem.
I don't know what you see when you enter your BIOS setup menu.
I've been running these systems for decades. My best friend worked for Phoenix writing BIOS code. The machine does not have an EFI BIOS.
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by AscLinux »

If your box is set to boot in UEFI mode (and we know it is) it will not show non-UEFI boot media as a boot choice.
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by slipstick »

To answer why I wouldn't take the results of gparted too seriously, it is because gparted gives errors on my USB stick which boots successfully on my computer.

At this point, I have no more ideas to try to help you. I hope someone else can find a solution to your problem. Good luck.
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by AscLinux »

Nobody can help a person who denies obvious. The computer is booting in UEFI mode. Maybe there is legacy CSM mode in setup, but we are not there watching over his shoulder.
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by markfilipak »

AscLinux wrote:Nobody can help a person who denies obvious. The computer is booting in UEFI mode.
and you know this, how?
Maybe there is legacy CSM mode in setup, but we are not there watching over his shoulder.
"Compatibility Support Module". My BIOS apparently calls it "Legacy". It is OFF. Come to my house. I've got this yummy brew. It's called "Oculto". It's the best damn beer I've ever had. Come over and we'll crack a few while we figure this out. :wink:
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Re: My experiences writing an ISO to USB stick -- Help!

Post by markfilipak »

AscLinux wrote:Nobody can help a person who denies obvious. The computer is booting in UEFI mode. Maybe there is legacy CSM mode in setup, but we are not there watching over his shoulder.
To put this notion to bed, here is the complete BIOS setup:
1 Information
1-1 Product Name = Lenovo V570
1-2 BIOS Version = 44CN43WW
1-3 KBC Version = 44EC29WW
1-4 Lenovl SN = WB02836788
1-5 UUID Number = 29E7DDC0-CB7A-11E0-80EC-B2DBD19D08CE
1-6 CPU = Intel Core i5-2430M CPU @ 2.40GHz
1-7 System Memory = 6144 MB
1-8 Hard disk = TOSHIBA MQ01AB - 1000 GB
1-9 ODD = HL-DT-ST BDDVD - ATAPI
2 Configuration
2-1 System Time
2-2 System Date
2-3 USB Legacy = [Disabled]
2-4 Wireless = [Enabled]
2-5 SATA Controller working mode = [AHCI]
2-6 Power Beep = [Disabled]
2-7 Intel Virtual Technology = [Enabled]
3 Security
3-1 Set Supervisor Password
3-2 Set Hard Disk Password
4 Boot
4-1 Boot Priority Order
4-1-1 ubuntu
4-1-2 ATAPI CD = HL-DT-ST BDDVDRW CP40NG10
4-1-3 USB HDD
4-1-4 USB CD
4-1-5 ATA HDD = TOSHIBA MQ01ABD100
4-1-6 Windows Boot Manager
4-1-7 PCI LAN = Realtek PXE B03 D00
4-1-8 ATA SSD
4-1-9 USB FDD
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