Advice requested re Linux Mint 18.3 Mate installation

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Corney
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Advice requested re Linux Mint 18.3 Mate installation

Post by Corney »

Good day,
Some background information
Current PC set up
Running Windows 10 64 bit with April 2018 Update (Disastrous).
3 x 250 GB Internal Hard drives.
C-Drive (SSD 250GB with 191GB free space. OS (Windows 10) and all programs.
D-Drive Blanco. But shows only 163 GB free (?) Would like to install Linux and all programs on there.
E-Drive Data only. 173 GB free space

Once Linux Mint 18.3 Mate edition and when all needed programs are installed and all is working well, am going to purchase a new PC.
Once new PC is ready, intended to copy current D-Drive to Current SSD Drive.
Remove SSD drive and install in new PC as C-Drive.
Use the current D-Drive as a C-Drive in the same old PC.
Is my trend of thinking correct?
This PC needs to be in use with Windows 10 till purchase of new PC.


Am a first time novice with Linux.
It appears to me there are three types of Linux installations.
1. Linux Only
2. Linux and Windows next to each other
3. Burn Linux Mint on a DVD, place it into my DVD Player while leaving the current system intact.
If my trend of thinking is incorrect in the chapter above, will have to go route 3.

A friend of mine had a dual OS system on his PC.
During start-up, a message came on his monitor asking: “Linux or Windows”.
Clicked on the one needed and the rest was done.
Can this be done when the 2 operating systems are installed on two different HDD’s?
Is this what is meant with the term: “Next to each other”?

Can someone please assist?
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pbear
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Re: Advice requisted re Linux Mint 18.3 Mate installation

Post by pbear »

Is the objective to end up with dual boot on the new machine? And, yes, you can do dual install with separate drives, though it requires advanced installation procedures (the auto installer isn't designed for that scenario). But if dual boot is only temporary, you're taking on a lot of work for not much advantage.

In any event, I wouldn't go about it this way. Much of the installation is hardware linked, especially drivers. Also, it's going to be tricky, even maddening, reinstalling the bootloader, which will have been installed to the SSD and wiped out when you copy over the "d:" drive.* Under the circumstances, seems to me easier and more efficient to go ahead, get the new system** and install Mint after transferring the SSD. Before you do that, copy Windows off the SSD with image backup, then restore to the current "d:" drive, so you have a working system while setting up and learning Mint on the new one.

* FYI, in Linux parlance, the first drive is sda, the second sdb, and so on. Moreover, unlike Windows, there's no such thing in Linux as separate drive designations for partitions. Rather, they are identified by number, e.g., sda1, sda2, etc.

** Be aware Linux generally doesn't work well on very new hardware, so make sure whatever system you're looking at is compatible with the current kernel and drivers.


As regards your second question, there are several options for booting Linux without installing it, including a USB flash drive with the same ISO as the DVD, a similar drive with something called persistence, which enables you to save settings and even install a few apps, and full install to USB drive (flash or HDD), which works well but is a bit complicated. Notably, full install to USB drive doesn't make any changes to the internal drive, so your current Windows system would be unaffected. Can tell you how to do it, if interested, but need to know whether your system uses BIOS or UEFI. Was it originally Win7 or Win8?
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Corney
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Re: Advice requisted re Linux Mint 18.3 Mate installation

Post by Corney »

Hallo pbear
Thank you very much for the prompt and eye opening reply.

Perhaps it is the easiest if I first fill you in on the old /new PC.
PC is plus minus 6/7 years old.
Only repairs done to PC was the Power supply that was replaced.

Yes, you are correct, it started as a Windows 7. Upgraded to 8.1. Upgraded to 10.

Main contents of PC are:
Motherboard: Gigabyte EP35C-DS3R
RAM: 4 x 2 GB 800Mh DDR3 sticks running at 1.5Volt
Processor: Intell® Core™2 Duo CPU E6750 @2.66GHZ 2.67 GHz
Display Card: Nvidia GeForce 8800 GTS 512MB Memory (Dual display)
Desktop Resolution 1920 x 1080
Active signal resolution 1920 x 1080

Not too long ago a Linux Mint was loaded on a USB. Everything was working fine, bar for being a little slow. Which, in my ignorance, I contributed to working from an USB as well as that the Motherboard and CPU was running on windows drivers. Did not test the Samsung MS 2070 multi-printer.

The replacement PC I wanted to buy, would be in the region of just below 30k. Which is a lot of money. Reason of purchase, want to do video rendering. To try and spend not that much, decided first to see if existing PC can’t be upgraded. Purchase parts that could be fitted on a complete new PC if need be.

From previous experience am fully aware that rendering can be a time taking project. Am also aware of people saying there is no Linux video program available that does not freeze up during rendering. But none of the complainants stated their Memory on the Motherboard and or their GPU. As per information obtained (don’t know if correct) the secret of smooth rendering is in the RAM dedicated to the GPU and Motherboard.

I intend to purchase the following:
Quad Channel - 2400MHz - 32GB (4 x 8GB) Corsair CMY32GX3M4A2100C11R RAM
An 8GB GPU. Make and model will depend on what can be fitted on my PC and or which new motherboard, as well as if a Linux driver is available.
If need be, a second 250 GB SSB provided as a scratchpad that can assist in the rendering.

Unfortunately, can’t make up my mind which Linux Video editor to use.

When running Mint from a USB (2) would that affect the speed negatively? If not, it would be appreciated if you could assist me how to do that.

My apologies for the long writing. It’s the only way I saw fit to give you the full picture.
Keep well
Cheerio
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pbear
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Re: Advice requisted re Linux Mint 18.3 Mate installation

Post by pbear »

Have no experience with video editing, in Linux or otherwise, so unable to comment on any of those issues.

As you have confirmed my hunch your current machine started as Win7, it really is out of the question trying to install on it then move the drive to a new machine. The old one uses BIOS, the new one will use UEFI. For a quick primer on what that means, see this How-To Geek article. On the other hand, what you could do is install to the current machine, learn how Mint works, then reinstall to the new one later. Indeed, I think that's probably the best solution (bearing in mind my caution about compatibility). Keep detailed notes of what you do the first time and it won't take very long to do it again the second time.

Regarding full install to USB drive, I assume what you had earlier was a mere live USB. I'm a little surprised you describe it as slow, as it should have loaded to RAM and been pretty fast. Perhaps you are referring to it taking a long time to boot, which would be normal. Alas, a full install USB will be even slower on your old machine, as the system does more writing to the drive than in a live session. In fact, a 2.0 flash drive will be intolerably slow. A 3.0 flash drive does reasonably well, even though you have only a 2.0 port. And a hard drive (2.0 or 3.0) does well on a 2.0 port, though not as fast as an internal. On the bright side, a full install USB drive would work quite well on the new machine, as it will have a 3.0 port. I have no idea, though, whether it would be fast enough for video editing.

In any event, I assumed the reason you asked about alternative ways to boot is that, if you won't be able to transfer the drive, you'd like to find a way to learn Mint without installing to the internal hard drive. Yes, you can do this. There are several methods, but (in my humble opinion) the one described in this thread is best suited to your situation. I recommend it because, unlike the internal drive, a USB drive created by this method will boot with both your current machine and the new one. Also, even if you end up installing Mint on the new machine's internal hard drive, the USB drive will remain useful as a backup (in case the internal drive crashes). As mentioned, the method will work with a 3.0 flash drive (assuming it is at least 32 GB), but I strongly recommend an external hard drive (SSD or HDD). The performance will be better, it will last much longer, and of course you will have more space.

By the way, be aware your problems with Win10 may be caused by the fact you are running it on an old Win7 machine. I tried it and was so frustrated I ended up reverting to Win7 (later converting that machine to Mint). Meanwhile, my other laptop, originally 8.1, runs Win10 fine. A new machine designed for Win10 is going to be much better behaved than what you have now. But, it will still be Windows.

Hope that helps. Good luck.
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Re: Advice requested re Linux Mint 18.3 Mate installation

Post by expat_tony »

@pbear
I have a new laptop with plenty (16GB) of memory but only one 256GB SSD and Win10 pre-installed. My old one has 8GB Mem + 1TB HDD which is about half full, but the machine itself is falling apart (loose flat screen meaning I can't fold it shut, incurably out-of-control mouse driver, & more)

As an alternative to making a dual boot and buying an external drive for data only, I've been considering this:
- get a 1TB external HDD & make it bootable with Mint 19, exactly(?) as I would with a USB stick
- install Mint 19 fully onto it (i.e. the HDD).
- change the BIOS boot order to give me Mint 19 any time it's connected
- if I need Win10 (for specialist software), I just unmount the HDD and restart.
As a side-benefit (though for me a priority,) my Mint 19 would then be portable to other machines, using a Function Key to get into their BIOS.

If I understand your post correctly, this is not a fantasy but perfectly possible. Have you done it yourself and are you satisfied with the performance?

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