Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

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simon007
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Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by simon007 » Sat Apr 10, 2010 3:11 am

Hello all,

I have a Toshiba P200 Satellite series laptop
150 gb hard drive ( partitioned ) C drive = 75 gb and edrive 75 gb.
2 gb ram and Intel Core 2 DUO T5250 @ 1.50Ghz
Ati Radeon Mobility HD2600
--Pre installed with Vista Premium ---------

I recently upgraded to windows 7 but found upgrading creates lots of issues
like usb not functioning properly. I have now installed the Windows 7 as a FULL
fresh install on the E partitioned drive ( not drive c ).
I now plan to install a version of linux ( probably Mint ) on the c drive where
the upgraded ( problem Win 7 is ). I hear that there might be problems with
as windows 7 is full installed on e drive. Is this true?
I would also appreciate clear advice on installing on this laptop so getting a DUAL BOOT
LInux MInt c drive and Windows 7 e drive.

Simon007

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fwc
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by fwc » Sat Apr 10, 2010 3:28 am

There should not be a problem as long as you are downloading and installing the latest version of Linux Mint. There is special booting software called "grub 2" which should handle the installation of windows 7 without a problem. You should see an option for Windows 7 underneath the options for Linux Mint 8 after you install Mint. Good luck.

vincent
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by vincent » Sun Apr 11, 2010 1:12 am

Just as long as you install Windows before Linux, you're going to be fine. I did it the other way around once and learned the hard way (although admittedly, re-installing Grub isn't that hard). If Windows 7 doesn't show up on the list of choices you get at boot, once you boot into Mint, be sure to open up a terminal and type:

Code: Select all

sudo update-grub
Debian Testing x64/LM9 Main x64/Windows 7 x64 - LG R580 laptop w/ Intel Core 2 Duo T6500 2.1 GHz, 4 GB DDR2 RAM, Nvidia Geforce G 105M, Ralink rt2860 802.11n, 300 GB WD HD 5400 rpm

simon007
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by simon007 » Sun Apr 11, 2010 3:17 am

I have a full version ( fresh install ) of Winows 7 installed on
E: drive ( partition )
C: Drive has a very buggy updated Windows 7 ( from Windows Vista ) -> this is where I am going to install MInt.
I am curious to know what is GRUB. Is it already on the mint install program or is it an independant program.

Simon

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beefstu
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by beefstu » Sun Apr 11, 2010 5:20 am

Its all on the CD. Its basically the bootloader that you will see first when you turn on your computer, just after the BIOS set-up. As its often the case that people have more than one OS on their computer with Linux, Grub easily allows you to select what OS you want to boot into, using the arrow keys to select the one.

In order to install over a partition which already exists, its a good idea to note down the size of the drive that you want to use as when you are installing it won't have C: or E: as these are just Windows assigned names. When you get to the partitioner in the installer, its probably best to select Manual and then find the correct partition. Both of the partitions will have NTFS as their file-system and the easiest way to differentiate them will probably be the size of them, assuming they aren't equal. Select the one you want and choose to format it as EXT4 and the mount point '/'.

As always however, you should back up important data before you start, just incase something goes wrong!
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vincent
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by vincent » Sun Apr 11, 2010 11:43 pm

simon007 wrote:C: Drive has a very buggy updated Windows 7 ( from Windows Vista ) -> this is where I am going to install MInt.
I'm confused now. You said you wanted to dual-boot, but now you say you want to overwrite your Windows partition with Mint. It doesn't work that way, unless you plan on using mint4win and installing Mint 7. If you want to go with the latest version of Mint and the following versions of Mint, where mint4win doesn't seem to be supported, you'll have to install Mint on a separate partition, not in the same partition as Windows.
Debian Testing x64/LM9 Main x64/Windows 7 x64 - LG R580 laptop w/ Intel Core 2 Duo T6500 2.1 GHz, 4 GB DDR2 RAM, Nvidia Geforce G 105M, Ralink rt2860 802.11n, 300 GB WD HD 5400 rpm

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Unhyper
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by Unhyper » Mon Apr 12, 2010 8:59 am

If I understood you correctly, you originally had Vista on drive C, which you then upgraded to Windows 7. But as often is the case with an "upgrade", it didn't work too well, so you did a clean (custom) install on drive/partition E. So now you have a messed up Windows 7 on drive C, and a "good" installation of 7 on E. And you want to replace the messed up Windows 7 installation on drive C with Mint, while keeping the 7 on E as a viable boot option. Am I right so far?

If so, you should be able to format the C partition during the Mint 8 installation process and use that partition to install Mint, thereby keeping the E partition with the second Windows 7 intact. Mint should automatically create a boot menu which will allow you to boot either Mint or Windows from drive E. Windows doesn't really care which drive letter it's installed to, so Linux can be on "C" and Windows on "E".

Make sure to copy documents you don't want to lose from the C drive to the E drive before installing Mint. Similarly, be careful when working with the partitions in the Mint installer utility, so that you don't end up reformatting the wrong partition and losing the "good" Windows 7 copy.

I have dualbooted Mint 8 and Windows 7 many, many times, and it's never been a problem, so long as Windows was installed before Mint.

simon007
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by simon007 » Wed Apr 14, 2010 7:21 am

Unhyper wrote:If I understood you correctly, you originally had Vista on drive C, which you then upgraded to Windows 7. But as often is the case with an "upgrade", it didn't work too well, so you did a clean (custom) install on drive/partition E. So now you have a messed up Windows 7 on drive C, and a "good" installation of 7 on E. And you want to replace the messed up Windows 7 installation on drive C with Mint, while keeping the 7 on E as a viable boot option. Am I right so far?

If so, you should be able to format the C partition during the Mint 8 installation process and use that partition to install Mint, thereby keeping the E partition with the second Windows 7 intact. Mint should automatically create a boot menu which will allow you to boot either Mint or Windows from drive E. Windows doesn't really care which drive letter it's installed to, so Linux can be on "C" and Windows on "E".

Make sure to copy documents you don't want to lose from the C drive to the E drive before installing Mint. Similarly, be careful when working with the partitions in the Mint installer utility, so that you don't end up reformatting the wrong partition and losing the "good" Windows 7 copy.

I have dualbooted Mint 8 and Windows 7 many, many times, and it's never been a problem, so long as Windows was installed before Mint.

Yes this is right.

All I have got to do now is burn the Mint download ( main ) iso image to disc.
I assume i just extract the zipped file and let the burning software do the rest
copying the Linux MInt folder?

Simon

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Pierre
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by Pierre » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:26 am

I assume i just extract the zipped file and let the burning software do the rest
copying the Linux MInt folder?
No - you don't do that.

use something like Nero to extract & burn the contents of that .iso to a cd.
- there is a option under Nero to burn a .iso correctly,
you don't just extract the contents & burn to cd.
Image
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simon007
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by simon007 » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:42 am

I have done it.

Not quite the way I wanted.

I selected the auto install option in regards
the auto partition option.
I really wanted linux mint on c and win 7 on e.
I still have both win 7,s drive c and e.
I have linux mint on I think c:
Just seems confusing.
I did opt to import Windows 7 files and settings etc from c
this is probably why the desktop wallpaper I had on my windows 7
drive c is on Linux Mint. ODD though
I am also very surprised to find that Mint takes ages to load up.
It stops then continues stops then continues
Very odd.

At first my Windows 7 on e drive would not start after I had selected it via grub.
Now it seems ok.
Have I installed mint wrong or just slightly awkwardly.

I know the above is slightly confusing but it seems the Linux mint i installed
seems to be mixing with windows 7.
I can also see a drive called Vista.

HELP

vincent
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by vincent » Wed Apr 14, 2010 3:33 pm

Hmmm...auto-partitioning could've caused a few problems. Boot into Mint, open a Terminal window (mintMenu > Terminal), and type the following:

Code: Select all

sudo fdisk -l
And paste the output here.
Debian Testing x64/LM9 Main x64/Windows 7 x64 - LG R580 laptop w/ Intel Core 2 Duo T6500 2.1 GHz, 4 GB DDR2 RAM, Nvidia Geforce G 105M, Ralink rt2860 802.11n, 300 GB WD HD 5400 rpm

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beefstu
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by beefstu » Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:11 pm

The vista option i think is actually the rescue partition on 7 at least it is on my laptop.

For a clue on whats making it start slow try posting the output of

Code: Select all

dmesg
here.

EDIT: it should take about 1min to start, it does for me anyway
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simon007
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by simon007 » Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:23 pm

Hello all,

I now know whats what.

C drive - was not touched
e drive had my windows 7 ( 75gb )
now e drive is split in to 2 partitions
50 gb for the win 7 and 25 gb for linux mint

Linux MInt does take a long time to boot though
it seems to stop and start

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beefstu
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by beefstu » Thu Apr 15, 2010 5:30 am

Does it take a while on the grub loading screen?
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by cebalrai » Mon Apr 19, 2010 8:37 pm

vincent wrote:Hmmm...auto-partitioning could've caused a few problems. Boot into Mint, open a Terminal window (mintMenu > Terminal), and type the following:

Code: Select all

sudo fdisk -l
And paste the output here.
After having a working Windows 7 installation, I installed Mint. Now only Mint comes up in Grub and I can't access Windows.

Sudo update-grub did nothing. Sudo fdisk -l returns:

Unable to seek on /dev/sda
Dell XPS 1730 laptop
Core 2 Extreme @ 2.8 Ghz, 4 GB RAM, GeForce 8800 GTX w/SLI, RAID-0
Linux Mint 10 64-bit, Windows 7

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nono
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by nono » Tue Apr 20, 2010 8:16 am

Actually, Windows 7 runs slower if it is not installed in the C: drive.
My advise to you to get it working again is to freshly install Windows 7 in the C: drive.

After installing Windows 7 in the C: drive:

1.Use the Mint installer to delete your E: drive
2.Then create a swap partition first, about 4gb. (select "swap area" in the use drive option in the partition editor screen).
3.Create an ext4 or ext3 partition for Mint (select "/" in the use drive option in the partition editor screen).
4.Then if you want you can create another ext3 or ext4 drive for your home files (select "/home" in the partition editor screen).

Enjoy the best OS IMHO!
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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by laceygriffen » Wed Apr 21, 2010 1:58 am

I was not knowing that dual boot Linux Mint and Windows 7 can be run on together because I tried linux mint 7 but it didn't work. I've searched goggle, but all i find are forums where I don't understand the terminology that the users use.But here i got the good guide with very clear understanding how to install it.

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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by StanTheMan » Wed Apr 21, 2010 7:46 pm

Toshiba laptops usually are pre-installed with Windows on C:drive and two hidden drives (one is a system back up and the other some Toshiba special tool menus)
C:drive is Primary partition 1 , and the hidden drives are Primary partitions 2 and 3 .
Do not change those hidden partitions.
To install Linux , reduce the size of C:drive only, to make empty space for a Linux install.
Then of that empty space make LOGICAL partitions for whatever Linux install you have planned.
You can only have 4 Primary partitions , so you need that last Primary slot to create an extended partition for your Logical partitions.

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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by lumi » Fri Apr 23, 2010 1:45 pm

I need some help, I hope this is the right thread!

I just got a Samsung N210 with Windows 7 preinstalled. Obviously the first thing I did was to install Mint on it - but instead of wiping the hard drive clean as I usually do I decided to try dualbooting, choosing the automatic partitioning.
Now, Mint works great as usual (I'm using Helena Fluxbox), but I can't boot into Windows. The option is there in the grub menu, but when I try to boot into it it just hangs for a while and goes back to the grub screen.
When I managed to access the Samsung System Recovery utility, not only it does not work (saying it can't detect the disk), but it doesn't let me boot into LM anymore. I had to boot from Live USB and install it again (this time I partitioned the hd myself, but the problem remains).
The netbook doesn't have an optical drive and I don't have a recovery disk anyway so if it's a problem with the Windows bootloader I don't know how to repair it.

Partitions are as follow:
The two Windows 7 partitions (the labels bug me: shouldn't it be the contrary?)
/dev/sda1 ntfs RECOVERY 15 GiB
/dev/sda2 ntfs SYSTEM 100 MiB

And the other partitions:
/dev/sda3 ext3 /home 115 GiB
/dev/sda4
/dev/sda5 ext3 / 27.95 GiB
/dev/sda6 linux-swap 2.8 GiB
(Plus a lot of unallocated space! I don't know what to do with it yet ;))

Any ideas? Please bear with me, I'm kind of useless at these things!

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Re: Dual Boot - Linux Mint and Windows 7

Post by Unhyper » Fri Apr 23, 2010 3:22 pm

lumi wrote: Partitions are as follow:
The two Windows 7 partitions (the labels bug me: shouldn't it be the contrary?)
/dev/sda1 ntfs RECOVERY 15 GiB
/dev/sda2 ntfs SYSTEM 100 MiB

And the other partitions:
/dev/sda3 ext3 /home 115 GiB
/dev/sda4
/dev/sda5 ext3 / 27.95 GiB
/dev/sda6 linux-swap 2.8 GiB
I'm not proficient with partitioning, but I know a bit. The labels on the Windows partitions are correct: the 15 GB partition contains a recovery system that was put there by your computer's manufacturer. It contains files that can be used to reinstall Windows. This is common nowadays as most PC sellers use a recovery partition instead of issuing actual discs. How you access that partition depends on your system. Your manual should include instructions, it's usually a key combination, much like when accessing BIOS. The 100 MB "System" partition is something that Windows 7 creates. Far as I can tell, it contains the bootloader information, and not much else. I've heard that there is a way to prevent Windows 7 installation utility from creating it, but I haven't looked into it.

If this is the complete and accurate partition information, then your Windows system itself no longer exists. If you want a dualboot system, I'd say at this point your best bet is to find out how to access the Recovery system (this is NOT the same as Windows' "Recovery Console") by either reading your manual or visiting OEM website. Then I would run Linux Mint Live CD and use gparted/Disk Utility to remove all partitions (backing up data you want to keep on flash or external drive). Then restart the computer and enter the Recovery system as instructed. Install Windows and set up partitions, leaving room for Linux (root, swap, home). I would put those in an "extended partition" as primary partitions are limited in number.

You can probably reinstall Windows without removing your existing Linux installation, but you'll have to mess with grub afterwards because Windows will just install its own bootloader and not include Linux in the options. It has been my experience that installing Windows first and Linux second makes life easier.

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