Handling of memory (after crash with Libreoffice) [SOLVED]

Questions about applications and software
Forum rules
Before you post please read how to get help
Post Reply
Ctulhu
Level 2
Level 2
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 5:45 pm

Handling of memory (after crash with Libreoffice) [SOLVED]

Post by Ctulhu »

I have a complaint here about how Mint handle memory allocation or something like that (with LibreOffice). Let me first anticipate and counter the usual knee-jerk reactions:

- yes, I know Mint is free and great and all that - in fact, I have converted a variety of people to leave Win or Mac behind - but being a fan doesn't mean one can't point out weaknesses;
- yes, I know what I did in LibreOffice was a mistake, but it was an easy one to make and my point is that a state-of-the-art OS, which Mint (12 KDE) claims to be, should be able to handle this better (on a brand-new system with a high-powered Intel i& QuadCore processor and 16GB of RAM)

So, I use LibreOffice 3.5.2.2, have two spreadsheets open. I copy a block of cells in one into the clipboard, ALT-TAB to the other, and, want to paste it in, but pressed CTRL-A before I did that, highlighting everything (the million or so rows). Mistake, yes, but easy mistake to make, especially since I had done something involving CTRL-A about 20 times before that AND in any other application, this would be unproblematic: the text in Writer or so would just be replaced). Problem: Mint was dead in the water. Over the next 10 minutes or so, it hardly reacts anymore, filled 16GB of RAM with LibreOffice crap, and even after I finally managed to kill LibreOffice off (with my xkill shortcut and in the System Monitor), the rest of the session was still dead: Firefox didnt react anymore, other apps won't open, etc. So, I had to reboot, which also took 5 minutes before the system shut down right ...

Now again, I know I shouldn't have pasted in a CTRL-A spreadsheet. BUT, SERIOUSLY????? In 2012, an application eats up all the RAM, and then when you kill it, the OS doesn't get back to normal and you have to reboot? On a system this powerful? I am no OS programmer (though I do some other programming) but isn't there some garbage collection, memory cleanup, whatever that is called, that brings a session back to life when the cause of the crash has been terminated? Just imagine this in an important production context, in a call center, in teaching, anywhere?

Now, recall my two anticipations from above: yeyeye, Mint is great (and it is, I use it on all my systems), and yeyeye, people make mistakes. But Mint's inability to recover here after a mistake that is not reallly a superdumb one - s..t like that can happen during rapid window changing etc. and it's a peculiarity of Calc that CTRL-A highlights so much -- is rather disappointing. Is that where Ubuntu/Mint 12 is at in 2012???
Last edited by Ctulhu on Mon Sep 24, 2012 12:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
DrHu
Level 17
Level 17
Posts: 7522
Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2009 8:20 pm

Re: Handling of memory (after crash with Libreoffice)

Post by DrHu »

Ctulhu wrote:But Mint's inability to recover here after a mistake that is not reallly a superdumb one - s..t like that can happen during rapid window changing etc. and it's a peculiarity of Calc that CTRL-A highlights so much -- is rather disappointing. Is that where Ubuntu/Mint 12 is at in 2012???
reporting bugs for LibreOffice..
http://wiki.documentfoundation.org/BugReport

OK, it is not Mint (the OS) per see that has the problem, it is the application and in this case a dumb user error: the application did exactly what you asked loaded all the data into its available memory

Now maybe there should be a runaway application crash available, but I expect you wouldn't like that any better, as in "what if it was a call center or an important business document"
--and maybe when you have killed the application, the OS should respond quicker: once it has cleaned up the crud from memory and reinitialized any processes that had been hung-up..
http://rudd-o.com/linux-and-free-softwa ... s-on-linux
  • What this "magic incantation" in limits.conf does
    limits.conf is the file that lets you set per-user/process/system resource limits. There are several limits to choose from. One of them is the address space (as). The address space refers to the maximum amount of RAM (in kilobytes) that a process may request from the operating system. Any requests above the configured limit are simply refused
--some strategies are available for this type of problem..

And if it is an application memory leak..
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions ... ak-639590/
http://lwn.net/Articles/104179/
--specific article referencing an app's memory allocation..

And just to validate your knee-jerk expectation..
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/For ... 9e91b4c584
  • you are not supposed to open files from Explorer View ...
    I suggest you train your users better.
One answer and correctly pointing out user errors (dumb or otherwise!)

OK, so windows also hangs on applications that runaway from the OS..
http://www.techsupportforum.com/forums/ ... 05994.html
http://help.wugnet.com/office/Excel-200 ... 55952.html
http://www.microsoft-questions.com/micr ... -2007.aspx
http://www.howtofixcomputers.com/forums ... 09786.html

We can all find faults in applications, OSs' or user actions
--it is no mark against people or systems; it is just a fact of life.
Post Reply

Return to “Software & Applications”