What is your back up strategy?

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Habitual
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Re: What is your back up strategy?

Post by Habitual »

Code: Select all

#!/bin/bash
cd ~
/usr/bin/udisksctl mount -b /dev/sdb1 /media/jj/internal  > /dev/null 2>&1
/usr/bin/udisksctl mount -b /dev/sdc1 /media/jj/external  > /dev/null 2>&1
clear
ionice -c 3 rsync -vaz --stats . /media/jj/internal/LM17/ --delete
ionice -c 3 rsync -vaz --stats . /media/jj/external/LM17/
du -sh /home/jj/ /media/jj/internal/LM17/ /media/jj/external/LM17/ /home/jj
#EOF
"internal" drive keeps a running current copy of my /home/jj
"external" stuff gets added as above but I keep everything for historical purposes.

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inxi -D
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 5001.0GB (4.3% used) ID-1: /dev/sda model: ST1000DM003 size: 1000.2GB
           ID-2: /dev/sdb model: ST1000DM003 size: 1000.2GB ID-3: USB /dev/sdc model: My_Book_1130 size: 3000.6GB
H.Remedy
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Re: What is your back up strategy?

Post by H.Remedy »

nonymous wrote:Once a week : LuckyBackup for documents, images, personal videos, to a Truecrypt container on an external HDD, that I leave at work.
The same thing on a TrueCrypt container on my NAS.
The same TrueCrypt that put out this very peculiar warning during the summer? http://truecrypt.sourceforge.net/ I'd stay as far away from that as possible. (There's a whole story behind this link. The wording at the top of the page has changed since the first posting in May. Needless to say, it is very strange that the TrueCrypt developers - who have gone to extreme lengths to remain anonymous - have now suddenly stopped developing the app and are apparently promoting Microsoft's solution.)
DeMus

Re: What is your back up strategy?

Post by DeMus »

DrHu wrote:Nope I wasn't kidding
--photos usually get transferred in, and there is always sync to a cloud service option.
So a sync to a cloud service is NOT a form of backup? You do have a copy on a different place, to me that sounds as a backup.
I must agree not a very good one, I mean who wants to put his valuable stuff on the internet (except some moviestars with too many selfies and homevideos) when you know it will be hacked some day?
No, every early sunday morning I boot my computer, I boot the Windows computer of my wife and I make backups over the local network to my external harddisk, which is only connected on these Sunday mornings. I use (G)rsync for that. That way I can only lose data from the last week.
On holidays I store the external disk somewhere else so when the computers get stolen we always have backup to restore. I do this only with data, software is available eveywhere on the net since we only use open source software, also on the Windows machine, except the OS itself of course.

I, but that is just me speaking here, I would never ever backup my things in the cloud since it is a 100% guarantee it will be hacked some day. Can take some time but the day will come. Nothing, absolutely nothing is safe on the net. When do people finally learn that?
I Know Nothing
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Re: What is your back up strategy?

Post by I Know Nothing »

As well as a backup strategy for your personal data a prevention strategy is a good thing to have to avoid breaking your operating system in the first place. I've got another identical Mint which boots on an external USB hard drive and any potentially risky updates or any other system changes I make myself I try out on that first. Also ofcourse handy to have at least one extra operating system (preferably on a separate drive) which you can switch to immediately and then fix your main system at your leisure should it break.
Dyfi
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Re: What is your back up strategy?

Post by Dyfi »

Daily Tar via cron and Fsarchiver running system.
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Jim Hauser
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Re: What is your back up strategy?

Post by Jim Hauser »

I use qt4-archiver to copy to separate hard disk. I make sure to create a dated folder first to put on the backup partition. After backing up system and home folders to that folder I then make a copy of the folder on the main hard drive. That way I have copies of each backup on separate drives.

As an added note there is a mint system on each drive. Mate on the backup drive and KDE on the system drive. Each Mint system has qt4-fsarchiver installed.

Backups on this current system takes about 10 minutes - restoring (if needed) to a formatted partition takes around 8 minutes.

I backup once per week on Saturday mornings and before making any potentially "dangerous" changes to the system.

Cheers!! Jim
Last edited by Jim Hauser on Thu Oct 16, 2014 11:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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NChewie
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Re: What is your back up strategy?

Post by NChewie »

I use a Makedirdiff through a script that I hacked together to compare the content of my data directories with the previous backup and produce a new directory structure of the incrementals, with a top level directory name that dateandtimestamps the backup and updates the full backup directory. I put this together when I was running Win7 and built the timestamping functionality in linux.
I cannot show the content of this script as a) my coding is a bit rusty and too many of you would laugh at the amateur hack and b) I hardcoded the actual names of the directories which I backup :oops:

Every month I back up the 'Full directory' to dvd (in an encrypted folder) and keep it offsite.
The incrementals remain on my laptop and a copy of each is backed up on the following monthly dvd. A copy of the incrementals also goes (encrypted) into an online backup drive.

This gives me the ability to step back in time if I have accidentally *damaged* the content of any important file.

I don't backup the operating system, as I do my utmost to leave it as vanilla - so if a total disaster happens, I can re-install from a live cd (which I keep handy).
I also keep an emergency copy of tails on usb, so I can gain access to my online backups from any public pc if all hell breaks loose.

For the low volume of changes that I have, this suffices. My work is mostly odt files... so they are small and it is easy to keep multiple copies of them.
Toshiba Satellite Pro C650-191 LM19.2 Cinnamon
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myrkat
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Re: What is your back up strategy?

Post by myrkat »

I have a Synology DS1813+ and use Cloud Station on all my computers (Windows, Mac, and most importantly Linux). I have it on my desktops and my laptops (and my airbooks). It is so nice having to not worry about backups.

I have my /home directory on its own partition, and map my Cloud Station folder to each user's ~/Documents folder (once all the NFS is set up, etc.). Synology has the app for Linux, Mac and Win - so it is just a matter of installing that, pointing to the NAS, setting the login info and voila!

So on my wife's macbook air, when I log into her account... there's her stuff. When I log into my account, there's mine.

I also have a Cloud Station folder called Homework, and I map that (like a public folder) to everyone's computer/login. This is where our kids have their homework directories (each grade gets a new directory... how anal is that?)

This DS1813+ is my third Synology, the DS107+ was my first way back when, and is currently my music server (only need 2 TB); my previous media server, DS407+, is our photo archive server (third redundancy for photos and important docs), while the 1813+ is our workhorse. Still have 4 empty bays for plenty of expansion when the other four 4TB drives get full (about 12TB after raid stuff).

Best investment I've made. Screw Apple and Mavericks for removing NFS functionality and having crappy networking (that was a headache... why can't it be simple like linux with fstab and such?).
Main Comp: i7-4770K @ 3.5GHz + nVidia 760GTX + 16GB RAM + SSD + HDD²
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myrkat
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Re: What is your back up strategy?

Post by myrkat »

NChewie wrote:I use a Makedirdiff through a script that I hacked together to compare the content of my data directories with the previous backup and produce a new directory structure of the incrementals, with a top level directory name that dateandtimestamps the backup and updates the full backup directory. ...<snip>...
Just wanted to mention to you (and anyone else doing difference / comparison backup stuff): I have been using Beyond Compare under windows and linux for some time. The latest version (written mostly in java, I think) is nice because they now have a multi-platform license for all three OS's (win, mac, linux) for a few bucks more than the standard. There is also a "pro" version, which I do not have/use (but might be of interest).

It is not F.O.S.S., so if one is looking for pure free and open, then pass this up. However, if one appreciates quality software and support, then give it a try (http://www.scootersoftware.com/) - it's also found in the Mint Software Center as a demo / unregistered. I use it to clone & update my media libraries (music and photos) and WOW directory (so I don't have to download, update, etc. over 3 or 4 machines) and cannot imagine life without it. Hate to sound like a shill, but it really is one of the most important utilities I own.
Main Comp: i7-4770K @ 3.5GHz + nVidia 760GTX + 16GB RAM + SSD + HDD²
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Join me and become a Linux Mint Community Sponsor and share some love! (for as little as USD$20 a month)
downhillschrott
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Re: What is your back up strategy?

Post by downhillschrott »

My data integrity and backup strategy (family/home office use):

1. All documents are stored on a Debian Wheezy Server using ZFS raidz2
2. ZFS Snapshots are taken hourly (keeping 24), daily(keeping 14), weekly (keeping 8), monthly (keeping 13)
3. ZFS Snapshots are exported to a 2nd Debian Wheezy Server using ZFS raidz2 (on site)
4. All files are additionally synced daily to a Windows Windows Prof7 Workstation on a RAID5 device.
5. Very important files are synced to the same Windows Prof7 Workstation (point 4) on a raid 1 device, encrypted with encfs4win (no filename encryption). This files are backuped with Backblaze (currently ~1.5TB).

Next step would be to get rid of 5. and put the 2nd Server off site.

pros:
ZFS - never worked with a file/raid/lvm system which is easier than this.

drawbacks:
- GBit Limit of the Network. Working with big Video files is a bit slow. Currently big files are written with 90-100% of the network bandwidth which is of course slower than a local SSD. This is still good enough for private use. 10GBase is to expensive at the moment.
- No encryption for ZFS (zfsonlinux)
- no file based encryption (ecryptfs) possible if files are shared with Samba: There is a bug which makes it impossible to manage files >4GB. If files should be backuped off site (encrypted), they need double space (1 working copy, 1 encrypted backup copy) locally.
- backblaze offers no linux client
- no gui for zfs. But it is not needed anyway.
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