Installing Tor browser

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OhioJB
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Installing Tor browser

Post by OhioJB »

Hi all,

Quick question on whether the instructions for installing the Tor browser on Mint 17.3 are ok to use for Mint 18? Thought it better to ask before installing it and having problems. I noticed there was a Tor option in the Software area, I did install that but it doesn't show up anywhere that I can find to click on to use. Guessing I need to type in commands that I've seen in instructions for 17.3.

Thanks, Jeff
OhioJB
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by OhioJB »

I went ahead and used the instructions available for 17.3 and it worked fine. Disregard.
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trytip
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by trytip »

instead of installing tor from the repos i would download the official latest https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en ... extract it, move to it another place or keep it where it's at and click the Tor Browser Setup or Start Tor Browser which ever is the executable.

this way you can delete the extracted folder when you're session is done and have a fresh tor every time you start it. no sense in keeping it installed on your system if you are using it for privacy reasons
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OhioJB
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by OhioJB »

Thanks for the tip. I'll play around with it the next few days. Not even sure what I'll use it for, just thought it might come in handy someday.
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TursonX
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by TursonX »

Hi forum.

Then, doing the described steps to Linux from Tor Browser official website: https://www.torproject.org/projects/tor ... l.en#linux, Will this be installed as a "Portable" program on Linux distros?
I read your advice, trytip.

There is the brief method through PPA repository described here: https://mintguide.org/internet/33-insta ... a-ppa.html, the webupd8team Tor works to me, it looks reliable.
The other Tor coming from Upubuntu, it didn't work to me.
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by myface64 »

I erad few weeks ago that the TOR has been compromise. No more secure that Firefox.
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trytip
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by trytip »

using my post will install TOR as portable yes. you should never install TOR as a permanent app on your system and never use a ppa even from webupd8 ... get it from the official site

and also yes, TOR is not much safer these days than a good firefox profile. but it being so slow i would only use it to get into sites that are blocked by your isp or country on the http protocol. the .onion network is still mainly hidden and safe enough but TOR is being WATCHED by FBI
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by phd21 »

Hi "OhioJB", and Everyone else,

I have been using the Webupd8 PPA for years to install and keep the Tor Browser bundle up to date and working. It has always worked for me. But, as was already mentioned, you can just download the Tor Browser bundle, and extract it to your "Home" folder, and run it that way.

Here are two interesting links regarding the "Tor" project, which states that it is still secure, but the user has to use it properly, and to be able to recognize warnings, or potential threats, etc... Read the comments as well.

Tor anonymity compromised by researchers, Aug. 03 2015
http://www.techradar.com/us/news/intern ... rs-1300922

Quora
https://www.quora.com/Has-the-Tor-Netwo ... f-the-user

Hope this helps ...
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by trapperjohn »

Or...
Install Whonix in a virtual machine:
http://www.whonix.org

This privacy/anonymity-centric OS installs Tor with important configurations and safeguards that are frequently overlooked (time attacks, DNS forwarding, etc.). It's based on Debian so it's a familiar environment for Mint users. I installed this in a KVM but Whonix has a wiki page for the VBox install. Definitely give it a try.

A related curiosity is the Qubes OS. It's an interesting study. There are some hardware restrictions and it's yum but, what the heck, I tried it out on a duel-boot and learned a great deal in the process. (Just a note; one laptop manufacturer ships their product with Qubes pre-installed.)
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trytip
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by trytip »

i'm still not sure why you'd want to use TOR for everyday surfing and email, TOR is not made for that. if you want privacy then you use TAILS distro which is a seasoned distro using TOR

you can't use TOR for http/https it's useless and slow ... it's mainly for .onoin network and you don't know what the .onion network is you shouldn't even bother with TOR
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by trapperjohn »

Humm,

If a person wants to evade government surveillance, then they should use a one-tme-pad and an offshore numbers station.

For the rest of us, if you are willing to tolerate a slow connection to selected commercial sites, Tor is an effective way to fuzz your geolocation, PII, and visitor footprint and predictability. It's also a hoot to see sites recommend restaurants in London when you're actually fishin' in the Louisiana Bayou. Your favorite social media site tells your friends you are touring South America and Italy. Oh, and Facebook has an onion.
myface64

Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by myface64 »

Iceweasel is fork of Firefox and more secure. Kali distro have it. Just wish that we have it in depo.
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phd21
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by phd21 »

Hi "OhioJB", & Everyone Else,

Good replies...

IMHO, it is just smart to try and be as secure and anonymous while surfing the Internet as you can be.

The "Tor Browser Bundle" is great, but as others have mentioned, you do not have any idea where your current Tor server connection might be from, what country, nor do I think you can control that, and that can skew your web browser results. Like user "trapperjohn" stated, it may appear that you are anywhere in the world, maybe in a different language, rather than where you are. So, your search results, and other websites, will reflect that, which is not necessarily a good thing. If you are trying to locate something in your area, like a restaurant or whatever, your results are going to show wherever your Tor connections are at the moment; which means if you are in the USA, your results could be some place in Europe or elsewhere in the world. Of course, you can be more specific when asking in your search to get the correct results. For this reason, I do not think that using Tor is for every day, all day, surfing the Internet, but rather for those special times, when your doing something on the Internet that requires more security and anonymity.

Anyone can make their system more secure and more anonymous, using any browser to surf the Internet, by:

1.) Changing your Local ISP connection's DNS server IP addresses to a neutral, secure, & anonymous, DNS provider's server IP addresses, like from the "openNic project", or "dns.watch", or "openDNS", etc... It is an easy thing to do. Personally, I think everyone should do this immediately, if you have not done this already. There are many advantages to this, besides the security and anonymity, like it can help you visit websites that your ISP might be blocking (which they do), usually faster speeds, probably more search results without a bias, and some can protect you from known "bad" websites that can harm your computer systems, and or for parental control.

2.) Additionally, using a VPN provider is another excellent way to make your surfing the Internet more secure and more anonymous, like the excellent, low-cost, system-wide, "Private Internet Access (PIA)" VPN provider with great service, and speed, and access to server connections world wide.

Having access to connect to VPN servers outside of where you are is important to view "geo-blocked" content which is where countries are (still unbelievably) blocking people from outside of that country from viewing their websites. So, if you wanted to see videos from the British News (BBC), or an Adele concert only available on BBC iPlayer, you could just connect to a UK server there, and be able to read, watch, or listen to, those videos and broadcasts. Another example is, you might be from one country, but happen to be in another country right now, and are homesick (want) to hear (or view) news, or music, or watch a local TV channel through the Internet, catch up with distant relatives, etc..., or maybe you are just curious and want to learn more about that country, then you could just connect to a VPN server in that country to do this.

And even the free VPN providers are better than using no VPN provider, like "vpnbook" or "vpngate". "vpnbook" is really nice, and pretty fast too, but they only have a few world-wide VPN servers, and they change their logon passwords every other week, which means you will have to update your VPN connections passwords every time they do that (not hard to do), and they allow no torrenting or p2p. "vpngate" is really nice as well, has locations all over the world, the logon is always the same, you can do whatever you want, but their VPN servers come and go; so one day you might be using a server connection, and the next day it no longer works, so you have to delete the non-working VPN connection, go to "vpngate" website, download another server configuration file for whatever country you wan to connect to, and set that VPN up, and try again. It is not hard to do once you have done some, but it is annoying to have to do it a lot.

There are also really nice & reliable VPN providers that are using VPN browser plug-ins that you can simply add to your browser(s), like "Hoxx" VPN, and "DotVPN", among others; these offer free VPN access to servers world wide, and low-cost paid for options as well which provide faster access and more server locations. But, browser VPN add-ons will not secure your whole system and all your programs accessing the Internet, like a "system-wide" VPN will do. This means that if you are using a desktop messaging client, or streaming (viewing or sending) video or audio through other applications, multi-media servers, Torrent clients, etc... that are run outside of the browsers, then these are not protected by the browser VPN add-ons, but these would be protected from a system-wide VPN provider. Some messaging clients are already secure whether you use a VPN or not ("QTox", "Jitsi", Linphone, Ekiga, KDE Telepathy, Empathy, Wickr, (Not Skype), etc...) Note, that It is easier to install and use a browser VPN add-on than setting up a "system-wide" VPN though. Although, once a "system-wide" VPN is installed and setup, it is truly simple to manage your VPN connection(s) through the Linux Mint Network Manager in your system tray panel, and all your programs that access the internet are protected by it.

3.) You can also "double up", or "Triple up", on your security and anonymity, by using a "system-wide" VPN, and a browser VPN, and or using the Tor Browser as well when needed or wanted.

Hope this helps ...
Last edited by phd21 on Mon Jul 11, 2016 11:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by trapperjohn »

Here are two sites that demonstrate interesting things that you reveal to big data and every site you visit:

The first is courtesy of the Electronic Frontiers Foundation: https://panopticlick.eff.org/
(When the test is done, you may have to click show full results for fingerprinting to see the nitty gritty details.)

Of special interest is the uniqueness of your browser (being unique is bad for anonymity). For example, on my desktop running Firefox 47.0 with a customized about:config, locked-down with No-Script, one out of every 1020 users are like me. For comparison, I have Debian Jessie VM with Firefox 45.0.2 where one in every 133,000 users are like me. Based on this one one parameter I am about 100 times more identifiable if I browse with the VM. If you live in a city with a population of ~130,000 people and you are using my Jessie VM, then you are probably the only one in town with that profile. (You can tweak this a bit with useragent switchers, etc.) You can take your laptop to the candy store 800 miles away and you will still show the same results for this statistic.

With my Whonix Tor Browser (6.0.2), which one might think would be rather unique, one in 1300 people are like me.

Uniqueness aside, note that with javascript enabled, you reveal considerably more information about your setup including your screen size/color depth, touch support, etc.


The next site is http://haunted-river.net/rdns2.php

This is a site that I setup as a test platform and the page linked above is intended to show what a given machine reveals (handy in my trade). The host server is located in Ohio so the time stamp is central time, easily converted to the time of day at the location revealed. It knows my IP, my ISP, my unique ISP account number, my browser, my OS platform, my city, country, region, language, and my character encoding.

Humm, hello world, it's 7:45 , I'm in Wastewater Texas, and my Verizon account is XYZ. By the way I use en_US.UTF-8 on a Linux computer and I'm using Firefox 47.0. I have nothing to hide but I'm not sure I'd step up to some suspicious slug on the street corner and tell 'em all this.

On the tor browser, I am in Holland today, my ISP is torservers, the IP is not my own, the time is off, there's no account number, I am using Firefox/Win32.. However, fortunately for me, It does preserve the fact that I speak English, so my searches don't crop up in a language I don't speak.

BTW: What is the most identity-revealing thing in this post? It's my sentence construction, the words I use, the mistakes I make, and the way I punctuate. You reveal your identity to big data by your voice as it occurs in writing. It's as good as a fingerprint.
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by dutchenery »

I am surprised no-one mentioned that it would be better NOT to install Tor on your computer but run it from a bootable usb-stick. I run Tails (a browser with Tor) and that works very well, however it is slow. This is for the paranoid of course. I was reading an article recently stating that most if not all computing hardware contain backdoors. Apparently (I don't know if this is true of course) AMD and Intel have since 2009 been introducing malicious functionality in their processors. The problem seems to be that Intel and AMD have been uncooperative in releasing the complete set of corresponding source code to this component. This means that NO ONE can check the integrity of the software running on it, and manufacturers are prevented from designing truly secure computers. As a result, EVERY SYSTEM IS COMPROMISED out of the box. Therefore using Tor or indeed Tails, is basically of no use and might give rise to a false sense of security. As mentioned before the FBI and others are busily monitoring web use as it is. I would say though that in the majority of cases and using available software enhancements (i.e Firefox add-ons) a browser like Startpage and having good passwords, you will be safe enough.
There is however a newish development, known as the EOMA68 Computing Standard. Have a look at this development if you are super-paranoid (like me) forget about Tor and use these devices in due course.
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TursonX
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by TursonX »

Hi again forum.

I wonder, if Tor browser was a choice, Could this "official Tor Repository to Ubuntu versions" be successfull to Linux Mint 17, 18??:
https://www.torproject.org/docs/debian.html.en#ubuntu
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by Moem »

Generally speaking, software that works on Ubuntu should work on Mint, so: yes.
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If your issue is solved, kindly indicate that by editing the first post in the topic, and adding [SOLVED] to the title. Thanks!
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TursonX
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by TursonX »

Oh, I note that "Tor Browser" is not the same as "Tor".
I added the official Tor repository and its gpg key, then after, I installed tor and its deb.torproject.org-keyring, as it says there.
What do features I get with them installed?

Please, if someone can try, and instruct us.
Then, could we install "Tor Browser" and keep it Updated with this Official Tor Repository?

Info from Tor website https://www.torproject.org/docs/debian.html.en#ubuntu:
To Ubuntu Trusty:
You need to add the following entry in /etc/apt/sources.list or a new file in /etc/apt/sources.list.d/:

Code: Select all

    deb http://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org trusty main
    deb-src http://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org trusty main
Then add the gpg key used to sign the packages by running the following commands at your command prompt:

Code: Select all

    gpg --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv A3C4F0F979CAA22CDBA8F512EE8CBC9E886DDD89
    gpg --export A3C4F0F979CAA22CDBA8F512EE8CBC9E886DDD89 | sudo apt-key add -
You can install it with the following commands:

Code: Select all

    $ apt-get update
    $ apt-get install tor deb.torproject.org-keyring
Now Tor is installed and running. Move on to step two of the "Tor on Linux/Unix" instructions.
?...?
I think. Perhaps, this prior steps are not necessary to using Tor browser.


https://www.torproject.org/projects/tor ... l.en#linux :
Linux Instructions:

Download the architecture-appropriate of .tar.xz Tor-browser-linux package (eg: v6.0.8), save it somewhere, then run one of the following two commands to extract the package archive:

Code: Select all

tar -xvJf tor-browser-linux32-6.0.8_LANG.tar.xz
or (for the 64-bit version):

Code: Select all

tar -xvJf tor-browser-linux64-6.0.8_LANG.tar.xz
(where LANG is the language listed in the filename).

Once that's done, switch to the Tor browser directory by running:

Code: Select all

cd tor-browser_LANG
(where LANG is the language listed in the filename).

To run Tor Browser, click either on the Tor Browser or the Tor Browser Setup icon or execute the start-tor-browser.desktop file in a terminal:

Code: Select all

./start-tor-browser.desktop
This will launch Tor Launcher and once that connects to Tor, it will launch Firefox. Do not unpack or run TBB as root.
Last edited by Habitual on Wed Dec 28, 2016 9:37 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Installing Tor browser

Post by kurdtpage »

I know this is an old thread, but with Mint 18.1 with latest updates, the Tor browser (7.0.4 x64) from the official source (https://www.torproject.org/download/dow ... sy.html.en) gives the following error:
Tor unexpectedly exited. This might be due to a bug in Tor itself, another program on your system, or faulty hardware. Until you restart Tor, the Tor Browser will not be able to reach any websites. If the problem persists, please send a copy of your Tor Log to the support team.
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