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Outdated packages in Linux Mint repositories

Posted: Thu Jan 26, 2017 1:25 pm
by eojl
http://packages.linuxmint.com/list.php? ... ena#import

For example:
minecraft-installer – Linux Mint repos: 0.1+r11-ubuntu14.04.1 – Official PPA: 0.1+r12-ubuntu16.04.1
Why 14.04 packages in 16.04 based Serena?

spotify-client (amd64) – Linux Mint repos: 1:1.0.27.71.g0a26e3b2-9 – Official repos: 1:1.0.44.100.ga60c0ce1-89

Old packages, why the import-packages can't be synced from official sources?

Re: Outdated packages in Linux Mint repositories

Posted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 10:26 am
by Hoser Rob
This is not a Mint issue strictly speaking, it's a common Linux issue. There is a conflict in Linux between having a stable system and having new software. The repo versions are tested for your point release and that's important.

The reason for this is that in Linux, backwards compatibility isn't like it is in Windows. You can't run a 10 year old Linux app and expect it to run as you can in Windows. Forwards compatibility doesn't work the same either. Which is why, when you're looking for support config info, it's so important to only use solutions that are for your Mint release. I actually usually use Ubuntu support things so that's ubuntu 14.04 for mint 17 and 16.04 for 18.

Erring (perhaps) on the side of stability is best for Linux novices because if you have to have the latest everything you need a true rolling release distro like Arch. But those are totally unsuitable for noobs. It's not a question of IF something will break some day when you update, it's WHEN. And you'll need very good Linux recovery skills to fix it. These aren't noob oriented distros and if you ask typical mint/ubuntu beginner type questions on their forums they'lll just tell you to install ubuntu or mint.

Note that all enterprise oriented Linux distros are long term support like Mint 17/18 or ubuntu 14.04/16.04. They have to be ... stability is all important there. Certainly more important than new software. Debian 8 stable (Jessie), which AFAIK is the most popular Linux distro for servers, still uses the 3.16 kernel. Android is still on kernel 3.10.

Open source apps are pretty mature so it may not be so much of an issue as you think ... they don't really change that much. In fact Mint 18 doesn't even use a newer version of Xfce than 17.3 uses, so I have even less desire to 'upgrade' from 17.3. I have 2 Mint installs and the only apps I didn't get from the tested repos are newer builds of SMplayer and VLC, for HEVC video playback. And I almost never use VLC.