Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Questions about applications and software
Forum rules
Before you post please read how to get help
cliffcoggin
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1120
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 6:40 pm
Location: England

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by cliffcoggin »

Halbarad wrote:
Tue Feb 05, 2019 4:24 pm
The only thing I am unhappy with is Timeshift. Why, I was unhappy before reading the posts in this thread, now I am also a bit shocked. I can't believe that a Linux program included in a major distribution and flaunted as a crown jewel comes without a help file or a manual -- worse, much worse, that you get the manual if you send some little money to the author. This is as puny a strategy as it could be and I just can't believe it. It would be much more honest and decent if the program were on sale. Every Linux distribution I know about always encouraged users' attempts to learn and to understand software and commands.
I read that the author of Timeshift only recently decided that his income from donations was insufficient and henceforth would be charging for it. You can't blame Mint for that if it happened after you installed Timeshift.
Cliff Coggin
User avatar
philotux
Level 5
Level 5
Posts: 832
Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2018 11:14 am
Location: Utopia

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by philotux »

cliffcoggin wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:05 am
I read that the author of Timeshift only recently decided that his income from donations was insufficient and henceforth would be charging for it.
That's only for Ukuu so far with a paid version which has more features than the free version.
https://github.com/teejee2008/ukuu
gm10
Level 20
Level 20
Posts: 10999
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2018 5:11 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by gm10 »

Pangolin wrote:
Fri Jul 06, 2018 3:10 am
Thanks guys.
So I should check all of the radio buttons in the "plus" column, right?
Why do I have 2 /root/ paths in the list?
No, you should not do that, those are meant to be exclusions, they are meant to be on the minus column.

What you can do is remove the non-default /root/*** entry with the triple asterix wildcard.
smurphos wrote:
Tue Feb 05, 2019 5:45 pm
Halbarad wrote:
Tue Feb 05, 2019 4:24 pm
without a help file or a manual.
Do you really need much more than the pretty extensive readme?

https://github.com/teejee2008/timeshift ... /README.md
Additionally there's also this: https://github.com/teejee2008/timeshift/wiki
Halbarad wrote:
Tue Feb 05, 2019 4:24 pm
I can't believe that a Linux program included in a major distribution and flaunted as a crown jewel comes without a help file or a manual -- worse, much worse, that you get the manual if you send some little money to the author. This is as puny a strategy as it could be and I just can't believe it. It would be much more honest and decent if the program were on sale. Every Linux distribution I know about always encouraged users' attempts to learn and to understand software and commands.
Entitled much? Be happy you get the program for free at all, nobody is under any obligation to write a free operating system and supporting software for you, nor the documentation for it. Be happy so many enthusiasts spend parts of their free time letting you profit of their work for free already. As the saying goes, you get what you pay for.

See, that's the thing, given enough time, I could write you the perfect software with the perfect documentation, but time is a precious commodity that can also be spent on such trivial things as earning a living or living your life. Blaming the guy who brought you timeshift for free for trying to recoup some of his losses by asking for a fee for the manual is petty on your part, not his.

So many people on this fine forum, you could all come together and write the documentation that you think is lacking.
Halbarad
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:30 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by Halbarad »

mchandler wrote:
Tue Feb 05, 2019 10:19 pm
So does that mean I would clone both sda1 and sda2?

That's OK, you have an EFI partition in /dev/sda1 and a Linux partition in /dev/sda2. It's better to make images of both: it's always good to have a copy of the boot partition, parts of the grub and connected files are in it and the image is quite small. I know that Clonezilla can backup both the partitions to a single image but I always made two separate images.
It's time to get a USB drive large enough to hold everything (no optical disc on my MintBox Mini)
Maybe it is, but the size of the image depends on the used space on the partition, it can be quite small (mine are normally between 3 and 15 GB). Do you have two free USB slots? One for the Clonezilla software, the other for the backup disk or flash card.
Halbarad
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:30 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by Halbarad »

cliffcoggin wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:05 am
I read that the author of Timeshift only recently decided that his income from donations was insufficient and henceforth would be charging for it. You can't blame Mint for that if it happened after you installed Timeshift.
Thank you, I am actually very happy with Mint. For a time I have been disappointed by timeshift for the reasons I wrote, but it doesn't exist any more on my system and so...
Halbarad
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:30 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by Halbarad »

gm10 wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:27 am

Entitled much? Be happy you get the program for free at all, nobody is under any obligation to write a free operating system and supporting software for you, nor the documentation for it. Be happy so many enthusiasts spend parts of their free time letting you profit of their work for free already. As the saying goes, you get what you pay for.

See, that's the thing, given enough time, I could write you the perfect software with the perfect documentation, but time is a precious commodity that can also be spent on such trivial things as earning a living or living your life. Blaming the guy who brought you timeshift for free for trying to recoup some of his losses by asking for a fee for the manual is petty on your part, not his.

So many people on this fine forum, you could all come together and write the documentation that you think is lacking.
I am aware that time is a precious commodity and that nobody is under any obligation to write a free operating system for me etc. etc. I never asked for that. It was offered to me for free. -- By the way, I also used some of my free time for giving some little contributions to the Linux community, mainly not in the form of forum posts. -- I have nothing against charging a fee on anything. I spent a good amount of money for software I need, I belong to the generation that used to buy their assemblers, compilers and programming languages -- and office stuff, photoshop etc. So, sell your software as you wish, just say it clearly from the outset.
Moreover, charging a fee for software included in a distribution is against many distributions' policy; if there is a change about that, let us know. But it seems to me that you are misunderstanding what I wrote, maybe not willingly. I said that charging a little fee for the manual after you give the software for free is puny as a strategy, a commercial strategy. Like a restaurant that advertises a full meal for 20$ and then charges you for water and seats.

I don't know, perhaps we disagree about Linux? (The "cause", again :wink: ) As I see it, one of the many reasons why Linux is great is that many people all over the world work in their free time for the fun of it (writing a good program is also great fun, not merely stress and frustration and unending debugging...); even more, because it feels good to produce something in your free time that can be of help to others. -- Many central benefits of Linux are no doubt present also in non-free software and distributions: say, open source programming, efficiency, etc. There is surely much more.

One thing I pointedly disagree about is: "you get what you pay for". No: not for Linux. You get much more than that. You normally get excellent OSs etc.

About writing the documentation: why not? But surely not against the will of the author of the program. To do so within her/his project in GitHub or wherever would be alright -- isn't this the way such things are normally done?
gm10
Level 20
Level 20
Posts: 10999
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2018 5:11 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by gm10 »

So we are not so far apart after all, good.
Halbarad wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:37 am
Moreover, charging a fee for software included in a distribution is against many distributions' policy; if there is a change about that, let us know.
Mint and all its included software are free. But that pdf documentation that he is selling is not part of the distribution. We even specifically forked Mint's version of Timeshift to remove a prominent donations button that his original version has, for example (nothing wrong with asking for donations as such, just not in the user's face like that).

So no, the policy has not changed, but it doesn't extend to related work product not part of the distribution.
Halbarad wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:37 am
One thing I pointedly disagree about is: "you get what you pay for". No: not for Linux. You get much more than that. You normally get excellent OSs etc.
Ah, well I certainly agree with that in general. But my reference was more specific. The part you're not paying for here and thus not getting is the pdf help document. For paying nothing you get only the software and the online documentation for free and as such it's take it or leave it.
Halbarad wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:37 am
About writing the documentation: why not? But surely not against the will of the author of the program. To do so within her/his project in GitHub or wherever would be alright -- isn't this the way such things are normally done?
First, I simply don't know if it would be against the author's will (despite his monetization efforts), you could ask him.

And second, there's no such rule in play at all. More typically in the FOSS world if you don't like how the original author is handling things you fork him. Since we already did, feel free to contribute here: https://github.com/linuxmint/timeshift
User avatar
mchandler
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2019 4:55 pm
Location: Colorado, USA

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by mchandler »

Halbarad wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:38 am
[Maybe it is, but the size of the image depends on the used space on the partition, it can be quite small (mine are normally between 3 and 15 GB). Do you have two free USB slots? One for the Clonezilla software, the other for the backup disk or flash card.
I have a few free USB ports. I'll check the partition sizes and see how much space I need. Thanks again for all the help/info.
Halbarad
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:30 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by Halbarad »

gm10 wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:49 am
We even specifically forked Mint's version of Timeshift

That's good to know. If the author is seriously committed to his job, as he seems to be, would it be possible to raise some money for him, in some not-too-conspicuous way? But this is surely not a matter for discussion here.
gm10 wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:49 am
Since we already did, feel free to contribute [...]
Thanks for this, and more thanks for working to the project. I have removed TS and have gone back to my old way -- monthly images of root home and EFI, data mostly in a separate partition with rsync copies to external HDD. I am perhaps the less competent contributor to a TS project one could wish for... :lol:

By the way, my Mint keeps going great, and I am presently making some moves to have some 100 copies installed in the place where I work. I know I am wildly OT, but I'd like to say I very much like that it's elegant and solid; so much focus on performance and it's very nice to look at too.
gm10
Level 20
Level 20
Posts: 10999
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2018 5:11 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by gm10 »

Halbarad wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:13 pm
gm10 wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:49 am
We even specifically forked Mint's version of Timeshift

That's good to know. If the author is seriously committed to his job, as he seems to be, would it be possible to raise some money for him, in some not-too-conspicuous way? But this is surely not a matter for discussion here.
Money was already sent his way (see https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3649) but apparently he closed his Patreon account and is turning his projects commercial and according to Clem isn't likely to keep actively developing Timeshift. We'll see. I'm not privy to more details than that.
azalea4va
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2015 12:08 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by azalea4va »

Let me add some perspective from someone who for over 40 years has been a professor of computer science and involved with unix/linux (since unix was first created).

1. Writing software is "cool" for us geeks. For many, rigorous testing and writing complete concise
documentation is not. But the latter are no less important than the former.

2. If you are writing software for yourself, you can do whatever you please. If you choose to share your
software with others (for free), you can certainly do so under whatever conditions you wish. But I
would hope most people have enough pride to not share something that is at least of a certain quality.
Just the opposite, I would hope people
want to share something they can be proud of. For those that feel that way, please refer to #1 above.
(I state this as a general principle and not as a specific statement on Timeshift. It is a comment
in response to "nobody is under any obligation to write ... the documentation". Yes, that is true, but
it is necessary for most if the author wants to achieve the goal of what they want to accomplish. IMHO,
documentation that is lacking is not a product of lack of time but lack of understanding of its importance
in creating something of quality the author wants.)

3. Comment 2 above applies to authors. The situation is different for those deciding what to include
in a distribution. I do believe there is a
responsibility to only include software of a certain standard of quality, which includes reliability
and documentation standards. I think that is the point Halbarad was making, his issue was not with
the software developer but with those deciding what to include in the distribution.

4. For software that may run as "root" and that deals with vital components (like the root filesystem) the
standards of quality must be an order of magnitude higher.

5. Documentation for software can be written from two points of view. The first is to think of the ways
people might use the software and explain how to get the software to accomplish those tasks. A so-called
usage tutorial. The second is to take the opposite perspective, to describe what the software will do in
response to possible inputs. Unix/linux has tradionally supplied the latter type of documentation, which
is consistent with its philosphy of viewing software components as a toolkit. The Windows philosophy is
to think of everything one might want to do and create software that peforms that task. The unix/linux
philosophy is that we are providing users with powerful tools and there is no way we can think of all the
imaginative ways the user community might find to use those tools. Because of that, tutorials are fine but
there is now way they can be complete because we cannot think ahead of time all the uses users might find
for using that software. What can be reasonably complete is a manual that describes how the options,
commands, and inputs are processed by the software.

6. One responder said "just stay with the defaults" and another said "do you really need much more than
the pretty extensive readme". The former comment is wise, but only if you understand what the defaults do.
This is especially true when one is dealing with something as critical as one's root filesystem.
As one example, based on the documentation (or lack thereof) supplied in Mint 19 (and I will include the readme file found
when going to the URL referred to in the Timeshift's Menu->About), i have no idea which directory's contents
are excluded when a backup of the root directory is created. A quick look indicates /dev, /proc, and /sys
in the backup are empty. Now I have no knowledge of any reson why their contents should be copied as their
contents is in my experience a runtime creation. But I do not know what I do not know. I certainly do not
know the needs on another's system. Give the user the power to understand the software functionality, so that user is not limited by what I might not know. Without complete
documentation describing behavior, lack of providing this information compromises the quality of the software.
See comment 2. Perhaps a more pressing example with respect to Timeshift, the directory /lost+found is not created in the backup. I have spoken with
the authour of Timeshift and this is intentional. IMHO, this is a bug, not a feature. The /lost+found
directory is NOT a normal directory. Just using 'mkdir' to create it is not adequate, at least
in the opinion of the designers of the ext filesystems. See the documentation on 'mklost+found' for more info.
This is NOT a question of whether or not Timeshift is treating /lost+found correctly. The author can decide whatever the author thinks is appropriate. But it is important users have complete documentation, so they can decide is the software is doing what they think it is doing. Particularly for something as important as something used to protect the root file system.

7.Although I use Timeshift, it is just a "toy". I rely on more primitive and simpler tools (apply the K.I.S.S principle).
A previous post asked "How difficult is it to restore a cloned image using Clonezilla". For me, a far simpler and more direct
is running the dd command as root.(WARNING: the commands below I am providing off the
top-of-my-head. DO not use directly, check them out as to what is exactly needed. I provide just to
give an example of how simple they are.) If you want to make a copy of a file system,
"dd if=/dev/sdaX of=BACKUP-FILENAME" does it. (The source file system should be either unmounted or
mounted read-only. Do an e2fsck on the backup file afterwards.) To restore, execute the opposite,
"dd if=BACKUP-FILENAME of=/dev/sdaX" (and e2fsck). If you want to maintain a mirror of
an existing subdirectory structure, then 'rsync' does that. For example to maintain a mirror of
the '/usr' directory, something like this does it, "rsync --delete -aHAXS /usr/ /MIRROR_FILENAME".
(Backing up the root filesystem is a little more complicated. One must deal with a variety of "special needs" directories as mentioned in #6 above. Whether using Timeshift, dd or any other tool, a longer conversation is required to detail all the issues and solutions.)
gm10
Level 20
Level 20
Posts: 10999
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2018 5:11 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by gm10 »

azalea4va wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 4:14 pm
1. Writing software is "cool" for us geeks. For many, rigorous testing and writing complete concise
documentation is not. But the latter are no less important than the former.
I fully agree with all you wrote. Quoting this part for emphasis. My code is usually well documented, but writing (and maintaining!) user-facing documentation is usually a chore and certainly not the fun part of coding. Once you're done with the coding your mind has already moved on to the next problem to solve, and it's usually not how to write the manual. :D

That said, I have started adding some man pages for some of the Mint tools, I don't like that none of them have any. But that's something else than writing a book on Timeshift, for that one efforts would probably be better spent cleaning up the UI and the default settings to make it both easier to understand and less error prone (before anybody gets their hopes up, I currently have no plans of taking that on).
cliffcoggin
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1120
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 6:40 pm
Location: England

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by cliffcoggin »

azalea4va wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 4:14 pm
Let me add some perspective from someone who for over 40 years has been a professor of computer science and involved with unix/linux (since unix was first created).
All I can add is to ask the developers to consider who they are writing programmes and code for. If the intended users are all Linux enthusiasts then little explanation should be needed, and all usage can be done in a terminal. On the other hand if the intended users are non-enthusiasts who, like me, come from a graphical (i.e. Windows) system then much more tutelage is essential as well as a graphical means to use the software wherever possible. I appreciate that the latter means much more tedious work, for which I am very grateful as a newcomer to Linux, but a GUI is the expectation of the majority of people who use computers nowadays.

From my point of view I regard a computer as a tool to help me do work, so I don't want to learn any more of the computer's operations than is absolutely necessary for my use. Driving a car seems a good analogy to me, in that one can be a thoroughly competent driver without knowing the first thing about an internal combustion engine. It's true that mechanical knowledge would help one to get the best out of a car in terms of speed or economy, but most folk just want a car to get them to work or the shops easily, reliably, and comfortably without having to worry about what brand of petrol they put in their tanks.
Cliff Coggin
Halbarad
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:30 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by Halbarad »

azalea4va wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 4:14 pm
IMHO, documentation that is lacking is not a product of lack of time but lack of understanding of its importance
in creating something of quality the author wants. [...] For software that may run as "root" and that deals with vital components (like the root filesystem) the
standards of quality must be an order of magnitude higher.
I entirely agree. In fact, I think that documentation and manuals are integral to the software.
azalea4va wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 4:14 pm
A previous post asked "How difficult is it to restore a cloned image using Clonezilla". For me, a far simpler and more direct
is running the dd command as root.(WARNING: the commands below I am providing off the
top-of-my-head. DO not use directly, check them out as to what is exactly needed. I provide just to
give an example of how simple they are.)
Again, I agree that dd is simpler -- once one knows how to use it :wink: It may be a bit dangerous for the absent-minded and the beginner.
Yet, in the first place, it duplicates all the partition, including the empty space -- unless one pipes the input to gz or uses conv=sparse after filling the empty space in the partition to be cloned with zeroes (which is still not ideal for SSDs) or... In a system partition of 100 GB I normally use less than 20 GB (that is, after moving big files to my data partition, which I systematically do before the cloning), and so the Clonezilla image is produced quite quickly and the image, being compressed, rarely exceeds 15GB; sometimes, e.g. after a fresh installation, it can be as tiny as 3 GB. ((So weird that I am now inclined to think of 3 GB as a tiny size! The Voyager 1 had less than 40 K. When I got my first IBM laptop 256 K around 1987 my first thought was: what can I possibly ever do with all this RAM?!?))
In the second place, if the user's purpose is to clone the system, they anyhow have to restart and reboot in order to have the system partition unmounted -- rebooting from a Linux live CD or USB pen drive is basically as tedious as rebooting from a Clonezilla CD or pen drive. (The author of Clonezilla suggests quite a complex procedure for inserting Clonezilla between the grub options in a Linux system. Just for the record, it would be interesting to know how many people on Earth have implemented it. I'd bet not many more than six, on an optimistic estimate.) I'd say that the users' purposes and situations determine which option is the best, case by case. When I duplicate an almost full flash card (say, with a system on it) to another one or to an ISO file, dd is also my tool of choice. -- Well, it's only good to have several options. Timeshift is one of them and it will probably improve in time.
gm10
Level 20
Level 20
Posts: 10999
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2018 5:11 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by gm10 »

Halbarad wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:17 pm
Just for the record, it would be interesting to know how many people on Earth have implemented it. I'd bet not many more than six, on an optimistic estimate.)
While not CloneZilla specifically, my GRUB has several entries to boot a number of file system images, so I guess you can count me. It's a very useful feature of GRUB.
azalea4va
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2015 12:08 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by azalea4va »

In the second place, if the user's purpose is to clone the system, they anyhow have to restart and reboot in order to have the system partition unmounted -- rebooting from a Linux live CD or USB pen drive is basically as tedious as rebooting from a Clonezilla CD or pen drive
No matter how you backup a root partition, doing so while it is "live' has risks. Changes can be occurring while the backup tool is running. One can avoid booting from CD/USB with minimal risk by rebooting in single user mode to run the backup. This is an advantage of using "dd", it can run in that minimal environment. Running e2fsck on the backup is required.
Halbarad
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:30 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by Halbarad »

gm10 wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:25 pm
While not CloneZilla specifically, my GRUB has several entries to boot a number of file system images, so I guess you can count me. It's a very useful feature of GRUB.
Your way of drawing conclusions from premises is... interesting. You don't have Clonezilla between your ISO images to boot to therefore I should count you between those who have. Moreover, the procedure I read about had little to do with booting to an ISO image. If I remember well, the author suggested to unzip the Clonezilla files to /mnt, change one or more directory names etc. etc. I guess it can be done more neatly with an ISO file in grb2. I used to store some ISO images of liveCDs in my HDD and change 40_custom accordingly before USB3 flash drives were so fast and cheap. However, I neither say nor imply that booting to an ISO image is not a nice feature of grub2: quite the contrary.
Halbarad
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:30 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by Halbarad »

azalea4va wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:58 pm
This is an advantage of using "dd", it can run in that minimal environment. Running e2fsck on the backup is required.
OK, that's fine. But I think the main arguments stand: a reboot is required and dd also backs up free space, unless one zeroes and uses conv=sparse. I am not trying to say that dd should be avoided, it's a great tool. The only thing I am saying is that Clonezilla is more convenient if a large chunk of the partition to be cloned is empty.
gm10
Level 20
Level 20
Posts: 10999
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2018 5:11 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by gm10 »

Halbarad wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 6:30 pm
gm10 wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:25 pm
While not CloneZilla specifically, my GRUB has several entries to boot a number of file system images, so I guess you can count me. It's a very useful feature of GRUB.
Your way of drawing conclusions from premises is... interesting. You don't have Clonezilla between your ISO images to boot to therefore I should count you between those who have. Moreover, the procedure I read about had little to do with booting to an ISO image. If I remember well, the author suggested to unzip the Clonezilla files to /mnt, change one or more directory names etc. etc.
Why so aggressive, love? While I can of course not know what obscure instructions you may remember, the official instructions suggest to do exactly what I was referring to: https://clonezilla.org/livehd.php, hence I'm quite happy with my conclusion drawing skills. Let's best leave it at that since it's quite irrelevant to the thread's topic at the end of the day.
Halbarad
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:30 pm

Re: Timeshift: should these patterns be excluded in snapshots?

Post by Halbarad »

gm10 wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 6:44 pm
Why so aggressive, love? While I can of course not know what obscure instructions you may remember, the official instructions suggest to do exactly what I was referring to: https://clonezilla.org/livehd.php
The page you link to exactly specifies the procedure I mention (the 'obscure instructions' I may remember). True, if you go on reading, he now says that it can be done also by booting to an ISO, which doesn't change the main point that you don't have it.
Aggressive? You have been extremely aggressive since your first answer: 'Entitled much?' 'it's petty on your part' etc. etc., and you are now. You are right when you say 'Let's best leave it at that'. This kind of nit-picking is only sad and it's entirely useless to the people who are reading. I tried to make a point:
that a program included in a Linux distribution and charging some little money for a manual is bad for the distribution and petty for the author;
that there are good alternatives to timeshift, including Clonezilla.

I had a quiet conversation with azalea4va about the respective merits of Clonezilla and dd as cloning tools. You replied in a fury to my first post and picked a joke between brackets from my latest post to reply to; now you link to a page and disregard what it says, just in order to -- to what? I don't know and I am not interested in it. I am not going to reply any more to this kind of stuff, my mistake that I did and regrettably do.
Post Reply

Return to “Software & Applications”