Timeshift ?

Questions about applications and software
Forum rules
Before you post please read how to get help
Post Reply
gh4snow
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 39
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2014 12:57 pm

Timeshift ?

Post by gh4snow »

I am trying Timeshift on 2 different Mint 19.3 PCs using /dev/sdb1 a separate 120GB SSD as the target storage media on both PCs.
So far it appears to store stuff ok, but if I run Bleachbit and eliminate old files, will the next Timeshift run remove the junk files from the updated storage media?

If the primary Mint SSD becomes un-useable, so that it must be reinstalled, can I use Timeshift from the Install DVD in "TRY MINT" mode without
having to do the "Install MInt" mode first ? Or must I "Install Mint" first and then run Timeshift in order to recover from the storage media ?

Is there a way to setup Timeshift to run at a specific time of day (ie a cron job or setting) ?
User avatar
Welcome
Level 5
Level 5
Posts: 954
Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2020 11:38 am

Re: Timeshift ?

Post by Welcome »

gh4snow wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 11:01 am
I am trying Timeshift on 2 different Mint 19.3 PCs using /dev/sdb1 a separate 120GB SSD as the target storage media on both PCs.
So far it appears to store stuff ok, but if I run Bleachbit and eliminate old files, will the next Timeshift run remove the junk files from the updated storage media?
When many of the members of the forum see the word Bleachbit, they cringe. Too many people have unwittingly destroyed their systems with that tool. To answer your question: The next Timeshift backup will not remove anything. It will create a backup based on the current contents of your system. Older backups will continue to include items that were in the system at the time of the backup.
In RSYNC mode, snapshots are taken using rsync and hard-links. Common files are shared between snapshots which saves disk space. Each snapshot is a full system backup that can be browsed with a file manager.

Timeshift is similar to applications like rsnapshot, BackInTime and TimeVault but with different goals. It is designed to protect only system files and settings. User files such as documents, pictures and music are excluded. This ensures that your files remains unchanged when you restore your system to an earlier date. If you need a tool to backup your documents and files please take a look at the excellent BackInTime application which is more configurable and provides options for saving user files.
gh4snow wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 11:01 am
If the primary Mint SSD becomes un-useable, so that it must be reinstalled, can I use Timeshift from the Install DVD in "TRY MINT" mode without
having to do the "Install MInt" mode first ? Or must I "Install Mint" first and then run Timeshift in order to recover from the storage media ?
Impossible to speculate on this since it is unknown how the primary Mint SSD became damaged or the extent of the damage. But, you can try to use an installation Live USB drive, and you can try to recover to an earlier backup of the system. Let me give you a example of when this wouldn't work: you accidently filled the first 20 GB of your SSD drive with zeros. But, if you reinstalled Linux Mint and have a working system (same version), then you should be able to recover to your previous Timeshift backup.
Snapshots can be restored by selecting a snapshot from the main window and clicking Restore button on the toolbar.

Snapshots can be restored either from the running system (online restore) or from another system that has Timeshift installed on it (offline restore).

If the main system is not bootable, then it is possible to boot from an Ubuntu Live CD, install Timeshift on the live system, and restore a snapshot on the main system.

Restoring backups from the running system requires a reboot to complete the restore process.
...
You can also Timeshift across distributions. Let's say you are currently using Xubuntu and decide to try out Linux Mint. You install Linux Mint on your system and try it out for a week before deciding to go back to Xubuntu. Using Timeshift you can simply restore the last week's snapshot to get your Xubuntu system back. Timeshift will take care of things like reinstalling the bootloader and other details.
Since installing a new linux distribution also formats your root partition you need to save your snapshots on a separate linux partition for this to work.
It is recommended to include hidden items in home directory by selecting the option "Include Hidden Items" from Settings > Users.
gh4snow wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 11:01 am
Is there a way to setup Timeshift to run at a specific time of day (ie a cron job or setting) ?
The short answer is no. This is by design.
Unlike similar tools that are scheduled to take backups at a fixed time of the day, Timeshift is designed to run once every hour and take snapshots only when a snapshot is due. This is more suitable for desktop users who keep their laptops and desktops switched on for few hours daily. Scheduling snapshots at a fixed time on such users will result in missed backups since the system may not be running when the snapshot is scheduled to run. By running once every hour and creating snapshots when due, Timeshift ensures that backups are not missed.
Applications like rsnapshot rotate a snapshot to the next level by creating a hard-linked copy. Creating a hard-linked copy may seem like a good idea but it is still a waste of disk space, since only files can be hard-linked and not directories. The duplicated directory structure can take up as much as 100 MB of space. Timeshift avoids this wastage by using tags for maintaining backup levels. Each snapshot will have only one copy on disk and is tagged as "daily", "monthly", etc. The snapshot location will have a set of folders for each backup level ("Monthly", "Daily", etc) with symbolic links pointing to the actual snapshots tagged with the level.
Ref: https://github.com/linuxmint/timeshift
3 steps to find an answer: (1) Search forum with unique key words. (2) Search with Google and add site:linuxmint.com to your unique key word query. (3) Search with Google and add either Linux Mint or Ubuntu to your unique key word query.
RVDowning
Level 2
Level 2
Posts: 67
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2015 2:27 pm
Location: Suwanee, Georgia USA

Re: Timeshift ?

Post by RVDowning »

But if timeshift is to only run once per day, how does one know when it is going to run so as to ensure that the system is still on? If the system is turned on at the day's first use and turned off after the day's last use, then a backup may or may not have occurred. A scheduled time could avoid this issue.
Lady Fitzgerald
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1229
Joined: Tue Jan 07, 2020 3:12 pm
Location: AZ, SSA (Squabbling States of America)

Re: Timeshift ?

Post by Lady Fitzgerald »

RVDowning wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 5:33 pm
But if timeshift is to only run once per day, how does one know when it is going to run so as to ensure that the system is still on? If the system is turned on at the day's first use and turned off after the day's last use, then a backup may or may not have occurred. A scheduled time could avoid this issue.
Which is one of two reasons I do manual snapshots instead of scheduled ones (the other reason is to avoid having Timeshift running at the same time as another app that could cause one or the other to corrupt the other app).

I manually make a weekly snapshot every Monday morning when I first fire up the computer. I also make a snapshot before doing anything that could possibly bork or otherwise mess up the computer, such as installing new programs or update the kernel. I only keep as many snapshots as will easily fit in the default Timeshift window. I manually delete the older ones as the Window fills up.
Jeannie

Linux Mint Cinnamon 19.3 Cinnamon 64 bit
System 76 Serval WS (serw11) 17" Laptop
cliffcoggin
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1370
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 6:40 pm
Location: England

Re: Timeshift ?

Post by cliffcoggin »

RVDowning wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 5:33 pm
But if timeshift is to only run once per day, how does one know when it is going to run so as to ensure that the system is still on? If the system is turned on at the day's first use and turned off after the day's last use, then a backup may or may not have occurred. A scheduled time could avoid this issue.
A scheduled snapshot time would only work if your computer is turned on at that time.

If it is important to you to guarantee at least one per day you have other options such as hourly or on boot. Set the schedule to whatever would ensure you have the frequency you desire. Personally I am happy with daily snapshots but my need will not match yours.
Cliff Coggin
mikeflan
Level 5
Level 5
Posts: 917
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2020 9:28 am
Location: Houston, TX

Re: Timeshift ?

Post by mikeflan »

Some people say you can schedule your daily Timeshift snapshot at a particular time.
Try this and tell us if it works:
viewtopic.php?p=1970355#p1970355
RVDowning
Level 2
Level 2
Posts: 67
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2015 2:27 pm
Location: Suwanee, Georgia USA

Re: Timeshift ?

Post by RVDowning »

I guess I'll just kick it off manually every day for the time being.
Post Reply

Return to “Software & Applications”