USB Flash drive installation

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1sweetwater!
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USB Flash drive installation

Post by 1sweetwater! » Sat Jun 13, 2015 8:51 am

Hey_all thanx for your support! I have memory problems aka Dementia and will try not to be too much of a burden on yall. Sometimes I need a little kick start and other times a bigger kick start mentally and some hand holding for getting things done with Linux using the desktop primarily. I may have another account here also and forgot about it but trouble working through that too?!?
I've got a 16 or 32GB flash drive that I want to install any version of Mint on first starting first with 17.1 XFCE. Been struggling with it for years using earlier versions trying to accomplish this on my own. I'm afraid I'll toast the drive without having a paint by numbers explanation for how to git-er-done. I have an old Athlon XP machine [15+ year old if you can believe it (Barton with 333FSB that can run at 400 as well as 1.5MMB @ 400mhz memory setting and doing it now)] I'd like to surf the net with it sometimes [when other hardware is in use] and use the USB flash drive as a hard disk type for temporarily storing information on while on line. Just running live CD to surf the net gets more complicated if I want to save or print some files etc... Hate to buy an ATA $$$hard$$$ drive just to do this. Phew hope that weren't too complicated. I remember one dude said put fat32 on there first and then there were other suggestions non of which I understood. The dementia sometimes keeps me from remembering basics like how to do things from with just a cue like how do I format to fat32 on there? I'm just looking for guidance with some explanations along the way about the best way to get Mint17.1 on the drive to be able to boot too like a hard drive and then maybe learn about VBox setup to run other distros if VBox is any different on a flash drive. I know how to install any OS on ATA or SATA but little variation changes on how something is done just trun my mind to ice with regards to understanding and doing it. That's the best I can explain it. Sometimes I need the paint by numbers version to kickstart the process. Thanx again if you wan to spend the time to help out. It's impossible for me to hold a thought and do something else and just about as hard to hold a thought and work from that thought until I've been through the process a time or two with guidance from another would be another way of saying it...

Neil Edmond
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Re: USB Flash drive installation

Post by Neil Edmond » Sat Jun 13, 2015 9:22 am

Pretty much just treat the USB drive like it is a regular (albeit small) hard drive. Here are more detailed instructions:

http://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial/view/389

1sweetwater!
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Re: USB Flash drive installation

Post by 1sweetwater! » Sat Jun 13, 2015 9:36 am

http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal- ... -as-1-2-3/ an download the universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/

http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal- ... -as-1-2-3/
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Thanx!
says it's not there any more! my dementia keeps me from being able to gleen information organize it together and act on it. I can work from a grocery list that says do this then this and choose this and do that etc.. sorry

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brainout
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Re: USB Flash drive installation

Post by brainout » Sun Jun 14, 2015 2:44 am

Wow, 1sweetwater, your post is timely. I was looking for a place to put what follows in case someone had a problem like I had, last year (see my other posts). NOW SOLVED step by step, below. So now, I'm happy to report that all my angst about installing Linux Mint to stick -- which might be preserved in the Forum or elsewhere about stick installation with Mint 13-14 -- is now totally allieviated, and it couldn't be easier. So maybe, 1sweetwater, what follows below will help you. I'm a senior, too. I'm presuming in what follows, that your computer is already configured to first boot from CD or USB.

1. Buy a usb stick, at least 64 GB. I had used 32GB, but it's not enough. I use Kingston (new 3.0 sticks out now are cheaper than the old 2.0 sticks in Amazon). They come as big as 128 GB, and at that big size, are about $50 (which is actually the cheapest per 1 GB).

2. Meanwhile or after, download your favorite flavor of Linux Mint 17 to a DVD (not a stick). Mate or KDE is the most like XP, but KDE has a higher learning curve, so I picked MATE. Also, while waiting for the 5-minute download, plug in the usb stick and right click on it in XP's Explorer (i.e., after selecting 'My Computer' icon), then select 'Properties', and then in the blank space near the tabs' top, type in a name like 'MintStick' or something memorable.

3. While your computer boots (preferably do this with an older laptop that's got at least 1GB of RAM and is offline), keep hitting the F8 or F12 key (sometimes F6, depends on the type), so it goes into the BIOS (meaning, it looks like a DOS screen with arcane information about your installed hardware). This buys you time to insert the DVD; and, if need be, change the 'boot sequence' so the computer seeks the DVD/CD drive or USB first.

4. Find the 'Exit' button or option and use it after the DVD is inserted. The machine will reboot into Linux Mint via the CD. It takes a while, maybe 15 minutes.

5. After you see or hear the Mint boot up success, put your stick into a USB port (preferably 3.0 'blue' if you have it). You do NOT need to be online. Wait until Mint recognizes the stick (lower right corner will pop up with a notification asking you what you want to do, just ignore it).

6. Look on the desktop for 'Install Mint'. Click on it.

7. Mint then begins installation, by asking WHERE you want to install. It will present you with all the drives/devices attached to the machine at the time. Be careful to pick the stick you just inserted as the target (the NAME should show, else at least stick SIZE, so it ought to be easy to tell the difference, despite Linux' weird way of identifying drives). When you're sure you've picked the stick, click on it.

8. Mint then asks you a few simple questions which you answer. Then, it does the rest. Installation can be unattended, takes up to 40 minutes depending on whether your stick is 3.0 and your usb port, too. It will signal you when it's done.

9. Use the Mint menu to quit, follow any prompts, and it will finally tell you to eject the CD/DVD, so do that when prompted. Then it shuts down, and you can take your stick out.

10. Wait maybe 10 minutes (so the computer will 'forget' what it just did), and then insert only the stick, turn the computer on.

11. Initial booting takes maybe 5-10 minutes, but it will be faster in later sessions.

12. After it boots, plug in your ethernet and wait for the notifications about updates, which will be in the lower right section of the taskbar/toolbar/panel/ribbon at screen bottom. Select the updates (all of them, if you don't know enough to choose). The updates will take 1-2 hours maybe. Then after all is done, shut down.

13. Pull out the stick, wait another 10 minutes, then insert and turn computer on again. Smile or have a glass of your fav beverage as you configure your new 'computer' on a stick.

Mint is Windows' best friend; especially, XP's best friend, since now its Internet Explorer cannot be used, and it has other vulnerabilities. So, you can surf with Linux, just as you said you wanted to do. Voila: I can plug that Mint 17 stick into my 2009 Acer Aspire 8.9" Atom-processor netbook running XP on 1 GB of RAM -- and still have all the joys of XP without sacrificing anything. The stick can read all those Windows files, and even use some of the fonts and cursors! When XP has problems, everything in Linux Mint or its repositories is there to fix those problems. But if you don't want Windows, well you can still put the stick into any machine.

And, if you want better than a backup, CLONE using Clonezilla (the standalone version you can freely download at Sourceforge, http://clonezilla.org/downloads/downloa ... lternative and select 'i386' in the dropdown box which is next to 'architecture' and at first says 'amd64' -- click on the tab, and you'll see 'i386', select that). It will clone stick to stick, stick to external hard drive, the former taking all night at that 64 GB level. So you want an old 60 GB hard drive as another clone, just in case. The latter will run faster, but a stick is more convenient. So clone to both, and you have two ways you can operate without any effect on your machine's innards. :)

A 'clone' is a LIVE BOOTABLE, physical replica, so there's no 'restore' or 'image' to hassle with. You can use any files on it directly, in any machine (well, if in FAT32, NTFS or other Windows-compatible format), and you can clone ANY Windows machine using Clonezilla, too. It's far better than any and every backup program sold for Windows, and far faster (70 GB in 20 minutes), more reliable. You can read and download a 2-page doc on 'Cloning Tips', here: https://vimeo.com/groups/pcworldalumni/ ... pic:265988 .

Mint plus Clonezilla have saved my Win7 machines 6+ times. (I have 18 Windows machines, none networked, because there are so many crashes and glitches, lol.) So when Windows crashes, all I have to do is clone back the clone, and then my formerly-dead Windows machine operates just like it did before the crash. Moreover, I can, for example, now boot my XP machines from a 128 GB STICK that is a clone of my XP hard drive, via Clonezilla. Same for Win7. For Win8 I don't know, but I'll try that when my newly-purchased (used) Win8 machine arrives, next week.

I just did all the above (except the Win8) last Saturday, and now my 2.0 Kingston 64 GB stick boots in less than 2 minutes, even without autologin.

Won't travel without it. Yell at me in Amazon, vimeo, Disqus or here if I'm unclear (same nickname). I think every human being should have one of these. Two years ago here, I wrote that I'd gladly pay $150 for such a stick, as back then I couldn't get it to work; I've been a harpy about it, ever since, complaining everywhere I could (temper temper temper)! Well, last week it worked perfectly, same test same machines same mechanism and I'm thrilled. So if I'm not clear in explaining, yell at me and I'll try to do better.

Oh: and you can get really good cheap machines at Ebay now. I just bought a Dell Latitude (business brand, much better made) model D630 with Win8.1 on it, for $100. It arrives next week. The testing above was done on two Dell Latitudes which are of higher power (costing $400 or less in Ebay now), with easily-removed internal hard drives compatible with the D630, and those models are E6510 (from 2010, i5 processor) and (newer) E6530 (same processor but newer, 2012-13). They were Win7 machines, but I removed the hard drives, replaced with new ones, and installed XP two weeks ago. I plan to use Clonezilla on them all. The days of spending tons of money for backup programs which never work right, are over for me. External drives and sticks are cheap now (60GB cost $20 on Ebay).

Finally, I made a post about how great Mint 17 is,here: https://vimeo.com/groups/pcworldalumni/ ... pic:265939 I don't think you even have to be a vimeo member, to post there. I 'own' that forum, but it's a tiny group, a place to think out loud without concern. And, it makes info usually hard to get, easier to find.
Hope this helps! :idea:
'brainout' or 'brainouty' on vimeo and Youtube, brainout.net my domain.

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Re: USB Flash drive installation

Post by brainout » Sun Jun 14, 2015 5:09 pm

YEEEEHAAAA!!! This is a followup post to both this thread and one I was just in ( http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.p ... 6#p1028226, but the followup is more relevant here. That link is vital, though, as it shows you how to get rid of the constant badgering for passwords. The solution seems pretty simple, actually. A one line command in sudoers.d put in a text file. So just think: when you want to enable passwords again, you just comment out the command. Then, when you want to disable again, remove the comment out. But that's a pistol, for you must open the file as an administrator. I had to use the README in there, paste in the command after deleting all that text and then saving as with a different name (the README is vital to the integrity of the OS, as it will tell you). For even as sudo, you're not allowed to create the one-line file and copy it in there. At least I wasn't. I had to gut out the README and then paste the line, then save as a different name (I chose passwordoverride, so I'd not forget where it was).

But hey: that's a decent-enough way to get around the password annoyance when you're busy installing, changing stuff in filesystem, etc. for an installation.

And here's the other gem, for Linux and Windows alike: YES YOU CAN INSTALL CLONEZILLA IN LINUX! I didn't go to sleep last night because it kept on installing but never showing up in the menu, and I was tearing my hair out. Yeah, because you HAVE TO RUN IT IN THE TERMINAL. Who'd a thunk it?

Command is 'sudo clonezilla'. Simple, huh. I have no idea how to stick it in the Mate Menu but maybe that's how, as a command in the Launcher. Will try.

Why is this important? You gotta have two Linux distros which can read each other, and Windows needs Linux like a baby needs a mommy's care. Seriously. So lookie here: I just booted Mint on my most important XP machine, and now VIA Linux I can clone my XP hard drive to another one, but retain the click interface of Mint. For Clonezilla looks in Mint, just like it does raw or in DOS, but within the Terminal window. Easier to handle.

Again, if you're not cloning Mint itself, this way you can do all kinds of important things within Mint with Clonezilla. Stick to stick copying is one of them. So one distro can 'babysit' the cloning of another distro and of course Linux can babysit the cloning of a Windows drive onto some other kind. Yeah.

God help me, one more installation remains, before I can sleep. Thank you all for your time and suggestions!
'brainout' or 'brainouty' on vimeo and Youtube, brainout.net my domain.

1sweetwater!
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Re: USB Flash drive installation

Post by 1sweetwater! » Sun Jun 14, 2015 11:19 pm

Twas a little lengthy and hard to follow first time through, but I'll keep re-reading it to see if it clicks later on. Thanx! An example of where I am ability wise: command line to me is copy the command, paste it in terminal at a prompt, and alter the text to match my circumstances/hardware.
My ability to learn while sorting and organizing and then do something with it -- is getting much worse I'm afraid.
I'm about fifteen years from becoming a Senior. Just had too many Brain injuries & chemical injuries & strokes & too much sleep deprivation. Might not make it to be a Senior if Pharmaceutical Companies have their way and if people don't stop using chemicals.

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Re: USB Flash drive installation

Post by brainout » Fri Jun 26, 2015 4:31 am

1sweetwater! wrote:Twas a little lengthy and hard to follow first time through, but I'll keep re-reading it to see if it clicks later on. Thanx! An example of where I am ability wise: command line to me is copy the command, paste it in terminal at a prompt, and alter the text to match my circumstances/hardware.
My ability to learn while sorting and organizing and then do something with it -- is getting much worse I'm afraid.
I'm about fifteen years from becoming a Senior. Just had too many Brain injuries & chemical injuries & strokes & too much sleep deprivation. Might not make it to be a Senior if Pharmaceutical Companies have their way and if people don't stop using chemicals.
Okay, here's the shorter version:

1. Download the iso of Mint you like and burn to DVD. Leave the DVD in the machine and turn machine off.
2. Grab your favorite drink then turn the power back on. Mint takes 10 mins to boot first time.
3. While it boots, grab an EMPTY external hard drive or stick that's at least 64 GB and plug it in.
4. After Mint boots, its desktoop has 'Install Mint' on it. Click on that.
5. Mint displays target drives for installation. Pick the one you inserted in #3.
6. It next asks you a few questions, might even complain about your drive having no space, answer whatever you have to in order to make it accept that drive. The other questions are to set up your username and password (as superuser aka root aka God). If you don't understand a question, just accept the default.
7. 30 minutes next transpire as Mint creates itself on that #3 step drive. Go Get lunch. :)
8. When it's done, it makes a pretty sound, and then prompts you to hit Enter for shutdown, during which you're prompted to turn off the machine.
9. So remove the DVD when it says to do so, but leave #3's drive/stick, plugged in. Turn off machine when told to do so.
10. Repeat Step 2. Then the machine boots, and you'll see your new and non-intrusive installation, come to life. :)

How's that?
'brainout' or 'brainouty' on vimeo and Youtube, brainout.net my domain.

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Re: USB Flash drive installation

Post by maurolm » Sun Jul 26, 2015 1:23 pm

hi there brainout, great tutorial! not sure if here is the proper place , do you have a similar tut on how to run MINT on a VIRTUAL MACHINE/VIRTUAL BOX on a machine running XP or win7? tks

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Re: USB Flash drive installation

Post by brainout » Sun Jul 26, 2015 7:09 pm

Hey, maurolm, glad you liked the 'tutorial'. I don't know how to use Virtual Box. Would rather just plug in my now-mobile Linux distros, as needed, into my XP machines. :)
maurolm wrote:hi there brainout, great tutorial! not sure if here is the proper place , do you have a similar tut on how to run MINT on a VIRTUAL MACHINE/VIRTUAL BOX on a machine running XP or win7? tks
'brainout' or 'brainouty' on vimeo and Youtube, brainout.net my domain.

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