Bios setting for M.2 ssd (Solved)

Questions about hardware,drivers and peripherals
Forum rules
Before you post please read how to get help
Post Reply
Mopar512
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:40 am

Bios setting for M.2 ssd (Solved)

Post by Mopar512 »

I have just install an xpg sx8200 m.2 2280 ssd in my asus prime b350m-a. Just plugged it in and installed mint 19.0 with no problems. It is not trouble free though. It has hung when I try to suspend it and it will only boot from a cold start. Freezes when I try a restart. I have looked around in the bios and do not see any settings specific to M.2. Has anyone tried something similar?

Any schooling on the m.2 ssd would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Roger
Last edited by Mopar512 on Sun Jan 13, 2019 9:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
ClixTrix
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1069
Joined: Wed Dec 09, 2015 11:40 am
Location: Columbus, Ohio, USA

Re: Bios setting for M.2 ssd

Post by ClixTrix »

I boot from the M.2 NVMe in my specs every day. Suspend works fine on my board too.

Could you please run the following command from Terminal and post back the results.

Code: Select all

inxi -Fxz
Edit: One tip from my board: With an NVMe x4 SSD, I can't use 2 of my 6 SATA ports due to lanes (PCIe) provided by the B350 chipset. Check your manual for restrictions/limitations.
Linux Mint 19.2 x64 Cinnamon 4.15.0-88-generic
Gigabyte GA-AB350M-D3H (F20) / Ryzen 5 1600 / Micron Ballistix Sport DDR4 2400 2x8GB / Sapphire Radeon HD6450
NVMe-SSD: Samsung 960 EVO 250GB / SATA-SSD: Samsung 850 EVO 250GB + Toshiba OCZ VX500 512GB

Mopar512
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:40 am

Re: Bios setting for M.2 ssd

Post by Mopar512 »

Thanks for the reply.

[coderoger@roger-B350M-A:~$ inxi -Fxz
System: Host: roger-B350M-A Kernel: 4.15.0-42-generic x86_64
bits: 64 gcc: 7.3.0
Desktop: Cinnamon 3.8.9 (Gtk 3.22.30-1ubuntu1)
Distro: Linux Mint 19 Tara
Machine: Device: desktop Mobo: ASUSTeK model: PRIME B350M-A v: Rev X.0x serial: N/A
UEFI: American Megatrends v: 4023 date: 08/20/2018
CPU: Quad core AMD Ryzen 3 2200G with Radeon Vega Graphics (-MCP-)
arch: Zen rev.0 cache: 2048 KB

flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 sse4a ssse3 svm) bmips: 27948
clock speeds: max: 3500 MHz 1: 1403 MHz 2: 1565 MHz 3: 1473 MHz
4: 1430 MHz
Graphics: Card: Advanced Micro Devices [AMD/ATI] Vega [Radeon Vega 8 Mobile]
bus-ID: 09:00.0
Display Server: x11 (X.Org 1.19.6 )
drivers: ati,amdgpu (unloaded: modesetting,fbdev,vesa,radeon)
Resolution: 1920x1080@60.00hz
OpenGL: renderer: AMD RAVEN (DRM 3.23.0 / 4.15.0-42-generic, LLVM 6.0.0)
version: 4.5 Mesa 18.0.5 Direct Render: Yes
Audio: Card-1 Advanced Micro Devices [AMD] Device 15e3
driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 09:00.6
Card-2 Advanced Micro Devices [AMD/ATI] Device 15de
driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 09:00.1
Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.15.0-42-generic
Network: Card: Realtek RTL8111/8168/8411 PCIE Gigabit Ethernet Controller
driver: r8169 v: 2.3LK-NAPI port: f000 bus-ID: 06:00.0
IF: enp6s0 state: up speed: 1000 Mbps duplex: full mac: <filter>
Drives: HDD Total Size: 240.1GB (6.8% used)
ID-1: /dev/nvme0n1 model: ADATA_SX8200NP size: 240.1GB
Partition: ID-1: / size: 219G used: 16G (8%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/nvme0n1p2
RAID: No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
Sensors: System Temperatures: cpu: 37.0C mobo: N/A gpu: 0.0
Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: 0
Info: Processes: 201 Uptime: 20:38 Memory: 1211.4/6895.7MB
Init: systemd runlevel: 5 Gcc sys: 7.3.0
Client: Shell (bash 4.4.191) inxi: 2.3.56
roger@roger-B350M-A:~$
][/code]

User avatar
ClixTrix
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1069
Joined: Wed Dec 09, 2015 11:40 am
Location: Columbus, Ohio, USA

Re: Bios setting for M.2 ssd

Post by ClixTrix »

You're running the Ryzen 3 2200G. You need to look at some of the posts/threads in the Forum on that processor. It definitely needs (at least) a newer Kernel for support of CPU/APU.
Linux Mint 19.2 x64 Cinnamon 4.15.0-88-generic
Gigabyte GA-AB350M-D3H (F20) / Ryzen 5 1600 / Micron Ballistix Sport DDR4 2400 2x8GB / Sapphire Radeon HD6450
NVMe-SSD: Samsung 960 EVO 250GB / SATA-SSD: Samsung 850 EVO 250GB + Toshiba OCZ VX500 512GB

Mopar512
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:40 am

Re: Bios setting for M.2 ssd

Post by Mopar512 »

Before I installed the M.2 ssd I was running a standard sata III ssd. With that drive the gpu would occasionally freeze. I upgraded the kernal to the newest available at that time and installed the amd sourced driver for the ryzen. The machine never froze again.

What's weird is that I now have the M.2 ssd installed and it is running stable on the current Mint 19 kernal with the exception that it will freeze on a warm boot but works fine on a cold boot. I don't understand it, but I am going to live with that for now.

nanohead
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Dec 28, 2017 10:34 pm

Re: Bios setting for M.2 ssd

Post by nanohead »

There should not be any setting for M2 SSD. In SATA mode, the mobo will recognize the drive immediately as will the operating system, as it is only a different physical connection, but it still SATA.

For NVMe, the Mobo should see it with no problems at all either, as the connector is set up to see either SATA or PCIe (NVMe). It may or may not see the NVMe drive as an AHCI device, but that shouldn't matter. By now, all the M2 NVMe connections for the standard chipsets (Intel and AMD) are pretty well worked out in firmware (BIOS). I haven't had a problem in a couple of years actually. The problems tend to be in the OS, where low level class drivers and storport drivers aren't ready. Microsoft dealt with this a couple of years ago, so Windows 10 now works fine and needs no external low level driver loaded at runtime or installation time....its embedded, and the SSD controller manufacturers all support it.

Linux on the other hand isn't 100% there yet in all distributions. I've had some weird behavior here and there. SATA M2 tends to work fine, but PCIe/NVMe less consistently, which is a Linux specific problem. I was actually planning on moving my Mint machine over to PCIe M2 this week, but its been giving me problems, as is the AMD Athlon 200GE, which won't display properly.

I installed Ubuntu (bummer, I love Mint) and it seems to be working, but need to test the Samsung EVO 960 M2 with it later today or tomorrow

Mopar512
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:40 am

Re: Bios setting for M.2 ssd

Post by Mopar512 »

Thanks for the detailed reply. I am now using it with bios set to defaults and it seems to work ok. However on a restart it still will not exit out of bios setup. It just loops back into bios setup. I am thinking there may be some fault with the ssd.

rbmorse
Level 3
Level 3
Posts: 186
Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 11:56 pm
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico USA

Re: Bios setting for M.2 ssd

Post by rbmorse »

I have Mint 19 booting and running off a Western Digital Black series M.2 NVMe device (/dev/nvme0n1p2) without problems.

Before I bought the WD device, I used an Intel series 320 M.2 SATA SSD for mass storage. That device could not be used as a boot device.

ASUS motherboard with Intel CPU/chipset.
Hope is not a plan

User avatar
kato181
Level 5
Level 5
Posts: 693
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2017 12:33 am
Location: Frederickton NSW

Re: Bios setting for M.2 ssd

Post by kato181 »

to get updated kernel you could use normal update or install ukuu to get latest kernels. I'm running 4.19 on my system and don't have a problem with that kernel.
just a thought

MrGrimm
Level 5
Level 5
Posts: 648
Joined: Sun Nov 11, 2018 9:13 am

Re: Bios setting for M.2 ssd

Post by MrGrimm »

staff already said it's a very bad idea to use ukuu.

Mopar512
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:40 am

Re: Bios setting for M.2 ssd

Post by Mopar512 »

What is wrong with ukuu? I have it on my machine and I used it to upgrade to the latest kernal. Everything seems to be working ok now.

User avatar
zcot
Level 5
Level 5
Posts: 749
Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2016 6:08 pm

Re: Bios setting for M.2 ssd

Post by zcot »

There's not anything wrong with ukuu. There are issues with "just throwing" mainline kernels at the system.

The idea of chasing kernel versions is a bad idea concept, because kernels are not like other software where a newer version tends to mean it's something better. There are plenty of users still using in the 4.4.x LTS kernel line because it fits with their hardware configuration. So like in that case, "updating to the latest kernel" is only eventually a path to failure.

But within a particular kernel version line you'll probably want to pay attention to the updates if they are patching against new CVE's.

Using mainline to test very new hardware or check for bug fixes is exactly why it's available.

In fact, from Ubuntu kernel wiki:
These kernels are not supported and are not appropriate for production use.
Those mainline kernels are not tweaked, patched(and you should be reading here security and exploit patch), or adjusted or fixed specific for the Ubuntu/Mint systems(which goes further than previously mentioned). There are plenty of times where something specific comes up with these systems(hardware and/or software related) and they get patched and sent downstream to the users, which is not happening with mainline.

Also, with the fixes that go into the Ubuntu kernels that are not going into mainline(up the stream) it's possible someone with a specific problem will never even be able to get a fix just updating to "the latest" every time.. -because "the latest" is not mainline versions.

So, "ukuu" is not bad. And not especially "mainline" is either since at times brand new hardware could get an initial benefit. But using ukuu to "update to the latest", "just because", is not a good idea.

Post Reply

Return to “Hardware Support”