Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

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Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

Post by MtnDewManiac »

I received one of those solid state drive things, and it went to the next door neighbor's house by mistake. She opened the package, so I was unable to simply write "REFUSED!!!!!" on it with a magic marker and make the mailman take it back for free. So I'm stuck with the thing. I ignored it for a while, but booting to an OS that's installed on a small-capacity USB flash drive takes a long time. And those "anywhere from a few seconds to I DON'T KNOW HOW LONG, BECAUSE I WANDER OFF AND RETURN LATER" pauses that happen with the approximate regularity of a heartbeat while I am trying to actually use the laptop are... difficult to endure.

So I installed the... thing. I have already done enough reading about it to have learned that, if someone ever compiles a list of the worst trash to get shoveled onto a cargo ship in China and exported to stupid consumers, that this one will rank so high that it will undoubtedly be included by name in the article's title. It's a PNY CS900 240-gig SSD. But, yeah, stuck with it. Trusty magnetic hard drive took one storm-fueled power surge & failure event too many and a large chunk of it got hosed. And the POS-Edition USB flash drive isn't cutting it. Plus, while I don't yet know if I truly won the PRC Junk Item lottery... I have obviously been luckier than several. After all, it didn't arrive already broken - and it survived the first FOUR DAYS of occasional use. So, yes, luckier than some people who've chosen to buy (or been chosen to receive it as a gift) one.

Therefore, I am trying to figure out how to use the blasted thing. I found three articles about the care & feeding of SSDs. Well, I probably found several dozen, but these three looked like someone actually put some effort into writing them. Unfortunately, that doesn't guarantee that the authors knew what they were writing about. Maybe they don't even 100% agree with each other, maybe I simply got too confused to make any sense out of them at different points and thought they weren't, or... IDK. One was on a Debian website, one was on a Fedora, Arch, I don't remember, one of those brainiac distro websites. And one was on some website or other that had a name which left me (stupidly) expecting the thing to be written so that normal people could actually understand it and follow its directions. Easy Linux... something or other, but it had Easy Linux in it for sure. Wow, that website was misnamed for sure, lol, it's just as full of gobbledeegook as the others - but leaves you feeling 100 times more frustrated than the others because, hey, you expected them to be about 22,000 miles over your head, but this one had
Easy" right there in the website's name :roll: . They could at least have named the website "Linux Advice That Will Have You Feeling Like Going Out and Murdering a Bunch of Kittens" or something; that way, those of us with IQs somewhat lower than 242 wouldn't have ended up feeling like we'd been figuratively hit in the head with a dozen or so assorted hammers when it turned out that we couldn't even make heads or tails out of that "easy" stuff.

So, anyway, I tried to figure this thing out on my own. I successfully got as far as... Well, I managed to (eventually) physically install the thing in my laptop. Then, after a couple of days of stressing and struggling to understand that whole "alignment" thing, I read that I don't even have to worry about it any more, because "linux takes care of that now." Yeah, right. Happy to have read that I don't have to manually align the disk format(?) and partitions, file systems, et cetera - and blissfully unaware that what I had read was WRONG!!! - I set about setting up the SSD and installing Mints to it. I like to do two installations, different version numbers, so that if there's some kind of show-stopper issue, it'll only take out one installation. However, that failed to work last time; I lost partition one altogether, the ability to boot into the other "distro" partition, random bits of data on that one, and maybe the MBR, too. And this SSD is pretty small at only 240 gigs. Maybe I should only do one distro version this time? Mint 19.3 Xfce really sucks, even the mousepad isn't working right on it, so I suppose I could get by with only installing 19.2. Or 18.something?

So I did the installation thing. Got Mint 19.2 on the first partition. No, that's not right. I made a little one first, so the laptop would have somewhere to put all the stuff that makes it able to read linux file systems (it's not a linux laptop, just a regular PC one), hold the grub menu I guess, and whatever other boot stuff the laptop needs to work with linux. And that master boot recorder thing, I suppose. Whatever stuff the computer needs to read Ext4 linux, IDK.

Had moved on to TRIM, figured out that my SSD apparently supports it. And was trying to understand that stride/stripe/block size/erase block size/IDK what all, when I was feeling like ten pounds of spoiled meat stuffed into a five pound sack. So, I felt like a little virtual pat on the pack might cheer me up, and used some tool or other to check to make sure that all my partitions were at least aligned. I know, I know, "the installers take care of all that alignment stuff now." But I was feeling worse than usual and wanted the boost, regardless of how microscopic it would be.

SURPRISE!!! - #2 partition is not aligned. :cry:

So here is what I need (not necessarily in the correct order, because I'm not a five-brained alien):
1. Someone who reads/writes English, is willing to help, and can communicate well with normal people.

2. I need to know the block size, erase block size, stride, stripe, any other fancy technical numbers I don't know about yet... and how/where to stick them.

3. I need to know EXACTLY how I need to partition this thing so that it will be aligned, both as a whole and each partition.

4. Need help with setting up the swap. I can still read part of my hard drive. Can I stick one on it? Its current swap partition appears to be mangled, but I'm not too sure that it'll take a partition creation/format in its place (or in that 272-gig hole at the beginning of the drive that used to be partition #1). IF IT WILL WORK, can I put one on the hard drive and another one on the SSD to be used as a fallback swap if it fails? Maybe with a reasonable timeout, like less than two minutes, before it gives up on trying the one on the hard drive and marks it permanently accessable? I know I need swap, because I only have six gigs of RAM and have occasionally seen most of that used, plus a bunch of swap (less than 12 gigs, though, I think). Generally when I have both web browsers open, or multiple windows of one of them, along with a bunch of tabs open. Stuff like that, I like to keep a lot of tabs up, because I have memory (etc.) issues, and probably tens of thousands of bookmarks. Kind of hard to find any specific one. With only a couple hundred web pages loaded in web browser tabs, though, it's easier (doable, at least).

5. TRIM. I know that I need it. I know that this model of SSD supposedly supports it. I know that "constant on" is a bad thing, both for speed - which I would have a great deal of difficulty caring less about - and longevity - which I care much about. So it needs to be scheduled. Some folks are stating that weekly is too long between events. IDK? Before I got to that part of that article, I was thinking it was about to explain how to set it up on a monthly basis, and wondering whether I would be better off scheduling it for every second or third Sunday or something. So how do I figure out how often it needs to be done? How EXACTLY do I set it up? I read something about some SSDs getting erased/blanked when TRIM gets set up, so I do understand that I need to do it pretty close to step #1. But does that mean even before (re)formatting the SSD and partitioning the thing? If so, where do I put the commands? How do I protect them from the formatting process. Er... Et cetera?

6. Initial SSD format, alignment of that format, creation of partitions, format of same, and alignment of same. As mentioned, it's only a 240-gig "class" device. I've probably got twice as much data just on the parts of my hard drive that are still readable. I'll have to pick and choose exactly what to copy over. And, now that I think about it, that's going to be EXTRA difficult, because it's apparently a coin-flip as to which will last longer, this SSD or my already pooched real hard drive. Which leads directly to #7...

7. How much "unused" space should I leave? HOW should I leave it? I mean... Do I need to leave a big chunk of space completely unformatted? If so, I already screwed that one up once. If not... Do I need to leave an empty area in each partition? Or just in one partition? If the latter, should unused space be the entire partition? In other words, should I create, for example, a 120-gig (That'd be half the drive. More? Less?) partition and just never write to it? And, if the answer to that is, "Yes," do I need to create it at the beginning of the drive, the middle, or the end of it?

Okay, I'm going to be more optimistic than I have been since I got out of diapers, and assume that someone - or multiple someones - has/have gotten me successfully through all of the above.

8. Minimize writes to the SDD!!!

8a. Set swappyness low - but not "off" - so that it will only use it if it actually needs it. And set that other swap thing (I can't remember what it's called, but it has "swap" in it, and maybe a period?) low, also.

8b. Logs, logs, logs... begone, lol. But, seriously, I don't need gigabytes' worth of "did this, it worked, everything is fine, nothing to see here" logs. And I don't need files full of the same error, either. I just need a sane set, not really logging anything unless/until there's a problem, then logging that issue - ONCE. If the system makes 50 attempts to boot, finally chokes out to that weird quasi-terminal environment (Mint 17.3 does this for me) or does a warm reset (Mint 18.something did this, but that might just be because thepartition it was on vanished in its entirety, IDK)... then there is ZERO reason for there to be 50 separate sets of the same multiple error reports! Just one, "Attempted boot, failed because your stuff is pooched" (or specifics, if available), along with a "tried multiple times" suffix, if that's an option. So how EXACTLY do I set this kind of sensible logging up? No one should ever have to delete a bunch of logs in order to recover space, unless that computer is being used across multiple "generations of time." And I am speaking of human generations, here, not computer ones. A megabyte is over a million bytes - and a computer should run for ten years of active duty before ALL logs exceed that combined length. So I'm really just trying to set my logging routines up to be the way that everyone's computer should be by default, right?

8c. I have Firefox and Chrome. They both write gigabytes' worth of temporary(???) files. I read something two or three times about setting all that up to be in RAM instead of on a drive. But I just ended up getting - you guessed it! - really confused. So how EXACTLY do I do this? I guess I need to set it up so that it keeps everything in RAM until I exit the program, then it writes it to the drive, right? (Otherwise, it would get lost...?)

8d. RAMdisk. There was some stuff about setting one of these up but, to be honest with you, I was so hopelessly lost by that point in my reading that I was literally having trouble with managing to keep my place whilst reading instead of ending up reading the same line over again, or the one beofre, or three down from it instead of the very next one. I kind of gave up and decided to ask for help about then. I'm still not real clear on how I can ever set one up in the first place. My laptop isn't that old - 2013 - but it only has six gigs of RAM. Still, I guess I need to do it, somehow. I want to be one of the lucky few whose PNY CS900 240-gig steaming heap of... thing lasts ten whole months. And that will undoubtedly take some doing. After all, the thing only cost something like $38 - and that $38 includes shipping cost, the cost of manufacturing and shipping anywhere from some to many replacements over the course of its three-year warranty, and at least some profit. In other words, PNY must have spent all of $1.15 to make it. Or maybe just the 15 cents, IDK. But... where was I? I have six gigs of RAM right now, a four and a two. According to Samsung, it will accept eight. But people have stated they've successfully installed two eight-gig chip cards into it, for a total of 16 gigs. I am hoping that, either this year or next, I will be able to purchase at least one eight-gig upgrade. That would put me at 12 gigs, and maybe/eventually/hopefully 16 gigs. With only six now, though, is there any use in setting up a RAM disk? If so, EXACTLY how do I do it? Will I have to redo it if/when I can obtain more RAMs?

8d(2?). Right now, my hard drive is technically still functioning, sort of. Can I set up, like some kind of temporary "pretend RAM disk" that uses part of that hard drive instead of actual RAM? Partition... I think it's SDA5, or maybe SDB5 or SDC5 is still mostly there. I can read at least some files, and have successfully written some to it and read them back. Could I somehow stick one onto that partition as some kind of big file? If so, how EXACTLY do I do that? Also, how EXACTLY do I do that in such a way that, when it stops being usable, the computer takes it in stride instead of pooching?

9. All the additional things that I have either forgotten or never knew in the first place, pertaining to SSD use, longevity, et cetera.

Thanks (very much!) in advance. I cannot offer payment of any kind. However, it should gladden you to know that there are a lot more normal-IQ level in this world than there are super-genius level twelve-year olds who, presumably, all the SSD FAQs are written for - and that, therefore, your help in this matter will eventually be likely to help a great many folks.

After making an effort to beg assistance from a bunch of people that I don't even know, I hate to make things worse by adding the words "as soon as you can get to it would be great," lol - but I think my USB flash drive Mint distro installation might already be failing :rolleyes: . It normally takes less than five minutes from pressing the power button to having a usable desktop environment/etc., but earlier today I turned the laptop on and... well, I don't know how long it took, because I eventually went down to eat something before I got the password thing. But that has me pretty worried, as does the fact that I just touched the flash drive (running it now) and it's hot enough that, if there was a four-foot tall pile of snow outside, I could probably unplug the flash drive, drop it on the snow, and five minutes later it would have melted its way clear to the ground (assuming that it wasn't ghastly hot and muggy out, of course). So, yes, the sooner I can get this SSD set up and usable as an "every day drive," the better. The USB flash drive thumb stick thing works today. Tomorrow? Probably (hopefully). The day after that? <SHRUGS>. . . .

Thanks again!
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Re: Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

Post by gittiest personITW »

Can you post the output to the following command:

Code: Select all

inxi -Fxz

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Re: Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

Post by MtnDewManiac »

gittiest personITW wrote:
Fri May 29, 2020 5:11 am
Can you post the output to the following command:

Code: Select all

inxi -Fxz
Sure. I just glanced at the output, and sda is the SDD. sdb is the USB flash drive that I'm currently running Mint (19.3) from, and sdc is my partially (mostly) ruined hard drive.

Code: Select all

System:
  Host: ######### Kernel: 5.3.0-53-generic x86_64 bits: 64 compiler: gcc 
  v: 7.5.0 Desktop: Xfce 4.14.1 Distro: Linux Mint 19.3 Tricia 
  base: Ubuntu 18.04 bionic 
Machine:
  Type: Laptop System: SAMSUNG 
  product: 350V5C/350V5X/350V4C/350V4X/351V5C/351V5X/351V4C/351V4X/3540VC/3540VX/3440VC/3440VX 
  v: P03ABE.006.CP serial: <filter> 
  Mobo: SAMSUNG model: NP350V5C-A01US v: BOARD REVISION 00 serial: <filter> 
  BIOS: American Megatrends v: P03ABE date: 09/20/2012 
Battery:
  ID-1: BAT1 charge: 0% condition: 48.8/N/A Wh model: COMPAL PABAS0241231 
  status: Unknown 
CPU:
  Topology: Dual Core model: Intel Core i5-3210M bits: 64 type: MT MCP 
  arch: Ivy Bridge rev: 9 L2 cache: 3072 KiB 
  flags: lm nx pae sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx bogomips: 19954 
  Speed: 2195 MHz min/max: 1200/3100 MHz Core speeds (MHz): 1: 2195 2: 2191 
  3: 2209 4: 2077 
Graphics:
  Device-1: Intel 3rd Gen Core processor Graphics vendor: Samsung Co 
  driver: i915 v: kernel bus ID: 00:02.0 
  Display: x11 server: X.Org 1.20.5 driver: modesetting unloaded: fbdev,vesa 
  resolution: 1366x768~60Hz 
  OpenGL: renderer: Mesa DRI Intel Ivybridge Mobile v: 4.2 Mesa 19.2.8 
  direct render: Yes 
Audio:
  Device-1: Intel 7 Series/C216 Family High Definition Audio 
  vendor: Samsung Co driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel bus ID: 00:1b.0 
  Sound Server: ALSA v: k5.3.0-53-generic 
Network:
  Device-1: Realtek RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet 
  vendor: Samsung Co driver: r8169 v: kernel port: 2000 bus ID: 01:00.0 
  IF: enp1s0 state: down mac: <filter> 
  Device-2: Qualcomm Atheros AR9485 Wireless Network Adapter 
  vendor: Samsung Co driver: ath9k v: kernel port: 2000 bus ID: 02:00.0 
  IF: wlp2s0 state: up mac: <filter> 
Drives:
  Local Storage: total: 952.01 GiB used: 11.52 GiB (1.2%) 
  ID-1: /dev/sda vendor: PNY model: CS900 240GB SSD size: 223.57 GiB 
  ID-2: /dev/sdb type: USB vendor: PNY model: USB 3.0 FD size: 29.80 GiB 
  ID-3: /dev/sdc vendor: Seagate model: ST750LM022 HN-M750MBB 
  size: 698.64 GiB 
Partition:
  ID-1: / size: 18.88 GiB used: 11.52 GiB (61.0%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sdb5 
  ID-2: swap-1 size: 9.54 GiB used: 0 KiB (0.0%) fs: swap dev: /dev/sdb6 
  ID-3: swap-2 size: 14.73 GiB used: 0 KiB (0.0%) fs: swap dev: /dev/sdc5 
Sensors:
  System Temperatures: cpu: 62.0 C mobo: N/A 
  Fan Speeds (RPM): N/A 
Info:
  Processes: 207 Uptime: 5m Memory: 5.70 GiB used: 1.23 GiB (21.5%) 
  Init: systemd runlevel: 5 Compilers: gcc: 7.5.0 Shell: bash v: 4.4.20 
  inxi: 3.0.32 
Additional questions, just ask. You may have to explain how I need to go about getting the answers, of course.

I forgot to put this one on my list, above:
9a. Figure out which option(s) to use, then further configure Ext4 for SSD use by using one or more of atime, noatime, relatime, and/or nodirtime. Also, do the same for journal, ordered and writeback. We get power failures here - and the battery hasn't worked in years - so I assume NOT writeback, but that's as far as I've gotten.

Thanks,
MDM
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Re: Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

Post by gittiest personITW »

Basically, follow the instructions on this site and you are less likely to go wrong.
https://easylinuxtipsproject.blogspot.com/p/1.html

Then, go to this page on the same site.
https://easylinuxtipsproject.blogspot.c ... t.html#ID8

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Re: Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

Post by MtnDewManiac »

Yeah, that's one of the three that I tried to figure out. Confusing as ****. Plus, it's incorrect clear up towards the beginning at 1.1, where it states that "In all current versions of Ubuntu, Linux Mint and Debian, all tools automatically align filesystems and partitions to the optimal 4096 byte page size. So there's no need to do anything for alignment on an SSD." But parted states that my partition #2 is not aligned. Also, how is 4,096 bytes an optimum page size if my block size is 512 bytes (which might be the case)?

Ref:

Code: Select all

https://easylinuxtipsproject.blogspot.com/p/ssd.html#ID1.1
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Re: Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

Post by MtnDewManiac »

<BUMP>

I just noticed that the USB flash drive I'm forced to use as a "hard drive" is too hot to touch for more than a moment. Are there no forum members who know how to correctly set up SSD and are willing to help others in some more useful way than merely suggesting I follow one of the incorrect FAQs?
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Re: Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

Post by lsemmens »

Plug it in where your old HDD was, boot from USB and opt to install. It's really that simple. They are treated by the OS as no different to the spinning platter.
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Re: Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

Post by BrianI »

I use a 120gb SSD for my / and /boot partitions. I use a mechanical hard drive (1TB) for my /home partition.

When I set up my system with the SSD, I simply created a 512Mb partition for EFI, then the rest of the SSD drive I partitioned for /root. I simply used the partitioning tool on the Mint installer while running the mint usb drive. I didn't do anything special.

Perhaps you are reading too much into aligning partitions / trim etc?

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Re: Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

Post by MtnDewManiac »

lsemmens wrote:
Thu Jun 04, 2020 9:39 pm
They are treated by the OS as no different to the spinning platter.
I know that; that's the problem!
BrianI wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 4:28 am
I use a 120gb SSD for my / and /boot partitions. I use a mechanical hard drive (1TB) for my /home partition.
My magnetic hard drive is pooched :cry: . Therefore, everything has to go onto the SSD.
BrianI wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 4:28 am
When I set up my system with the SSD, I simply created a 512Mb partition for EFI, then the rest of the SSD drive I partitioned for /root.
I figured out how to turn off all that EFI crap when I "turned off" (deleted) Microsoft Windows, thank goodness. (At the time, my model of laptop appeared to be one of the models that could turn into a brick if that stuff was handled incorrectly, and I'm not a supragenius with an undamaged brain, so...)
BrianI wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 4:28 am
Perhaps you are reading too much into aligning partitions / trim etc?
Could be. I have read that misalignment of partitions causes unnecessary writes to the SSD, in that, when the system attempts to write a block of data, the drive ends up having to write two blocks of data, instead. I don't care about "performance" (in other words, speed), I care about longevity. And, with a device that is designed in such a way that drive writes are a finite resource, this seems comparable to only having one glass of water for the day - and not caring that, for every drink I take, I spill an equal amount onto the ground.

If you have evidence to the contrary, and it's in a form that normal people can understand, I would LOVE to read it. Because, with everything else going on (here) right now, I would just as soon lighten the stress load just a tiny bit before I have a heart attack.

The same with TRIM; if you have evidence that it is completely unnecessary and the use of it - or lack of same - is completely unrelated to (my specific model of) SSD longevity, and one doesn't have to have a high IQ to decipher it, please post a link to the information.

I would love to just quit worrying about it, love to find proof that I can just treat this piece of <BEEP> like it was a good magnetic hard drive without it expiring on me in less time than the magnetic one did (THIS one only made it seven years, but the laptop has been dropped countless times, and suffers a power failure every day or two, sometimes several per day, without a functional battery - so that might have artificially shortened its life and explained why it died so quickly on me, IDK).

I just treid to edit my FS Tab, to put in that notime and realtime stuff, and it didn't look anything like the example.

I did figure out how to get stats on my drive (sure wish I had taken a picture of that, or of whatever it was I did to get them). From what I saw, it doesn't even look like this POS has any of that "wear-leveling" stuff. The reviews at the Amazon store website look like a mix of people saying it's great and those who had the thing die within the first year. Probably because half of them haven't figured out how to get those who are HOARDING THE SECRET KNOWLEDGE LIKE IT WAS THEIR LAST MORSEL OF FOOD TO HELP THEM SET THE THINGS UP PROPERLY!

I thought about trying to post an ad on that CraigsList offering to trade it for a working used magnetic hard drive five years old or newer - but then I realized that I wouldn't wish this hassle on anyone. Plus... I mean, who would be dumb enough to jump on that "deal?"
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Re: Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

Post by Pierre »

are you going to Dual_Boot with the Windows System :?:
- - if not, then you don't actually need any /boot partition, as such.
or, even use an UEFI system, either .. ms_dos partitioning - - will work, just fine.
lsemmens wrote:
Thu Jun 04, 2020 9:39 pm
Plug it in where your old HDD was, boot from USB and opt to install. It's really that simple. They are treated by the OS as no different to the spinning platter.
so, that is all that you have to do :!:

if you do wish to go with the older method,
- then you can still have a separate / root on that SSD,
- then have an separate /home on that 1Tb HDD as well,
- even an separate /swap on the SSD - - if you wish to.

or, you can just go with what lsemmens, has said .. let the LinuxMint Installer take the entire SSD,
and then just keep your DATA on that 1TB HDD .. if you can get it working, again.
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Please edit your original post title to include [SOLVED] - when your problem is solved!
and DO LOOK at those Unanswered Topics - - you may be able to answer some!.

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Re: Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

Post by MtnDewManiac »

No, no Microsoft OS. Just two Mints and I guess a swap unless I can make that work on my messed-up magnetic hard drive. I just need them to be properly aligned and to get my FS Tab properly configured. All the temporary stuff in RAM will have to wait until I can get some. Might be next year, IDK.

I'll have to look at the rest of your message later. I need to go try to get some food and my brother said if I walk out to the main road, when he drives by this afternoon, he'd give me a ride part way there. If he says he'll do something, usually he's pretty late - but he's been early a couple times, too. And he doesn't wait, just slows up to see whether I'm already standing there.

Thanks.
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Re: Received New SSD - Would an Expert Help Me Format/Partition/Correctly Install Mint (This time), Please?

Post by BrianI »

Perhaps this article will help ease your mind, MtnDewManiac?

https://www.howtogeek.com/322856/how-lo ... ally-last/
When large-scale flash storage first came to the consumer market as an alternative to conventional hard drives, the biggest concern (aside from price) was longevity. Tech fans had a pretty good idea of the general reliability of hard drives, but SSDs were still something of a wild card.

But years later, the market for SSDs has matured considerably, and we’ve got a lot more data on…well, data. The good news is that SSDs are probably much more reliable than you think, and certainly at least as good as hard drives in terms of data retention and failure rates. The bad news is that SSDs tend to fail more often with age, and not with extended data reading and writing, as formerly predicted.

That means that you’re no more likely to lose data with an all-flash setup versus a standard hard drive…but that it’s still essential to keep a data backup of important files.
Looking at the specs on the PNY website, they state that your PNY CS900 240gig SSD has a mean time between failure rate of 2,000,000 hours. So a bit over 228 years! I don't think any of us will still be around by then :) Also, they seem to give a 3 year warranty for the drive. So, just use the drive, and enjoy it!

The other thing about reading negative reviews of hardware, is how many people go to the effort of writing good reviews, if they have no issues with it? So perhaps read the negative reviews with a pinch of salt.

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