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jesica
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career

Post by jesica » Mon Aug 26, 2019 8:27 am

Good day all

i would like to get some advice form everyone out there please
I did search the net and did some research
what is your take on the following career path
I was thinking to do
- RHCSA, RCHE and RCHSS
will the follwoing course be of any help if I have done the Red Hat path
- Ethical Hacking, Security analyst, Forensics,
I also dont know if I must do a network course with it or does Red Hat cover that
Andy advice will be appreciated

regards
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Happy apt-get-ing!


Security is the separation of an asset from a threat.

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Portreve
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Re: career

Post by Portreve » Mon Aug 26, 2019 9:03 pm

jesica wrote:
Mon Aug 26, 2019 8:27 am
Good day all

i would like to get some advice form everyone out there please
I did search the net and did some research
what is your take on the following career path
I was thinking to do
- RHCSA, RCHE and RCHSS
will the follwoing course be of any help if I have done the Red Hat path
- Ethical Hacking, Security analyst, Forensics,
I also dont know if I must do a network course with it or does Red Hat cover that
Andy advice will be appreciated

regards
I'm not going to approach this from the standpoint of someone knowledgeable in GNU+Linux certifications; instead, I'll approach this from the standpoint of a long-time technologist.

One of the biggest problems I see in the tech industry is the very shallow amount of knowledge overall in people's toolkits. It's all fine and well that you get a particular distro's certifications, or even some kind of networking or security certification, but unless you really understand how things work at the most fundamental level, all you've got is a piece of paper and fairly surface-level knowledge.

There's far too many companies out there which seem attractive to perspective tech sector workers, but for the good ones, they won't hire you without you having a fair amount of background and experience, and the crap ones will hire you, but either they won't pay what they should, or they're really part of the problem and you just become a blunt instrument for them to use. I'm sorry if such judgemental comments seem harsh, but they're based on decades of watching the state of things basically go in the toilet.

Personally, I'd start off learning the absolute fundamental basics of how technology works. Probably reading history books wouldn't hurt, either, because it may be about the only way you can gain a perspective you likely can't hope to develop any longer at this point. Personally, as far as certifications go, I'd include some broad-based general ones, like A+ and Net+ and others of that nature.

I've seen what passes for "computer" classes in college these days, and all they are are expensive Microsoft indoctrination programs. At this point, it's unlikely you'll find someone teaching who has experience stemming from the 1970s or 1980s and is truly competent to comment on why things work the way they do or how they come to be the way they are.

And for goodness' sake, NEVER assume you know enough. You DON'T know enough. You will NEVER know enough. You'll only ever know enough to know you need to learn more, and to give you a strong basis and framework upon which to build more knowledge.

There's two lines from two different Star Trek movies I'd like to quote to you. No matter what else you do and no matter what else you learn, you'll quickly discover these are universals:

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

KIRK (to Saavik): You need to know why things work on a starship.


Star Trek III: The Search For Spock

SCOTTY (to Kirk and McCoy): The more they overthink the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the drain.
I'm so down wit' dat', yo, dass ich unter dem Beton bin.

Presently rocking LinuxMint 19.2 Cinnamon.

Remember to mark your fixed problem [SOLVED].

All in all, you're just another brick in the wall.

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Portreve
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Re: career

Post by Portreve » Mon Aug 26, 2019 9:21 pm

I'm doing this as a separate post because, while related, this is a far more specific set of comments than the preceding post.

If I were going to teach a technology fundamentals class and I was given free reign over curriculum, here's just a little snippet of what I would do.

Once we began to make the switch to electrical component-based computing systems (that is, with capacitors and transistors and even vacuum tubes, etc.) a choice was made in how to represent the most low level of data.

Don't consider this that I'm telling you about 1s and 0s. That's only one expression of this standard, not the standard itself. The thing to understand is the idea is to have two distinct and replicable conditions, or states. In magnetic media, it's magnetic charges of two different strengths. On more "visual" medium, such as punch cards or optical discs like CDs, LaserDiscs, Video CDs, DVDs, HD-DVDs, and Blurays, that's a surface or the absence of a surface (lands and pits). In memory devices from basic RAM through USB flash drives, you have bits on a storage chip which can be flipped one of two different ways.

If you go back to, for example, the core rope memory in the Apollo Guidance Computer, along with later missile and other guidance systems of the 60s and early 70s, you have wire which passes through a metal (typically iron) ring. If the ring is configured in one direction, it's a 0; otherwise, it's a 1.

The concept of bits, or binary, is much like the DNA and RNA sequences in genes, with basic concepts able to be complexified and combined to represent the most sophisticated possible data. As such, the binary (1 and 0) standard is used instead of any number of other actual or potential systems.

Binary data consists of strings of 1s and 0s. Humans do best to read these strings from right to left, with the first placeholder value being 1, and the last one 128, allowing for a value between 0 and 255.

Hexadecimal numbering came into being and is used to allow the same data to be written more compactly. For example, you see this in HTML code where a color is specified. It's far more sensible, for example, to write #FFBF40 than 00001111 00001111 00001011 00001111 00000100 00000000.
I'm so down wit' dat', yo, dass ich unter dem Beton bin.

Presently rocking LinuxMint 19.2 Cinnamon.

Remember to mark your fixed problem [SOLVED].

All in all, you're just another brick in the wall.

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Portreve
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Location: Florida
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Re: career

Post by Portreve » Mon Aug 26, 2019 9:51 pm

Last Thought (for the night, at least):

A good technologist does not care so much if a piece of knowledge, or a way of doing something, is outmoded or outdated. A good technologist always asks the "Why?" question. That's one of the biggest differences between people of the 70s and 80s who were into computers, and people of today: a comparative lack of curiosity.

Why, for example, did MIT build the Apollo Guidance Computer memory modules using core rope memory instead of something else? Don't end your curiosity by saying "It's all they had." It's not all they had. Texas Instruments had pioneered computer chips in the early 1960s.

Even though we no longer use core rope memory, or even bubble memory, when you're designing a system to fly in space, you have to secure it and that means these days using radiation-hardened circuitry (which didn't exist in the 1960s). There's many factors that went into this, and if you are interested, there's a number of very interesting videos on YouTube, including of a group of enthusiasts who have built simulated ground test equipment and connections so they can hook a real live AGC up and get it working. Seeing one of those sitting next to a modern-day laptop is a bit like having a Model T sitting next to a Hyundai Elantra.
I'm so down wit' dat', yo, dass ich unter dem Beton bin.

Presently rocking LinuxMint 19.2 Cinnamon.

Remember to mark your fixed problem [SOLVED].

All in all, you're just another brick in the wall.

User avatar
jesica
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Posts: 2623
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2009 3:54 am

Re: career

Post by jesica » Tue Aug 27, 2019 12:58 am

Thanks of the advice

I alreadu did A+ and N
I also did electronics, and have been doing the basic at work for 19 years

I want to focus on something specefic now and built a good base

I want to focus more on IT security with Linux, it is not just work for, it is more for pastion,

I hear what you say, i just want to know will the RH route be enough or will a work require more short courses in that sense

regards
Image

Happy apt-get-ing!


Security is the separation of an asset from a threat.

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