Digital disorganization

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Netherprovinc3
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Digital disorganization

Post by Netherprovinc3 »

I am starting to feel overwhelmed with my digital life.

I have programs installed outside of the main repository, I have virtual machines, I have previous computers that I used before going full blown Linux.

This might not be so Linux specific but I'm feeling like I have files and configurations all over the place and feeling like I don't have things locked down organization wise. Also not reasonably backed up.

I feel like I also become avoidant of things that are in "disrepair." And since I avoid them, I forget things that I have figured out. I do take notes sometimes and/or forum posts serve as good notes. But, inevitably there are holes.

I am somewhat thinking out loud here but what I am getting at is how do you motivate yourself to keep your digital life organized? What do you do when you feel like you have spent a reasonable amount of time on something and you hit a dead end? This forum has been hugely helpful with questions (I almost definitely would not still be with Linux, and probably on a worse path, if it wasn't for this site). I get the feeling that Linux can pay off eventually, as I will automate things more.

One of my problems is that my other computers are not easily accessible. I have to unplug this computer, and plug one of those in instead. They are basically offline. I basically avoid them at all costs.

Another issue is that I have files and folders of things that I rarely use. And they get in the way. I have tried to have folders for things that are backburnered or archived but then they become tough to find. Note taking applications have similar problems.

Maybe some of you have examples of things that you did to attack the clutter, or at least put and end to its growth.
Last edited by Netherprovinc3 on Tue Dec 10, 2019 11:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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rene
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by rene »

Netherprovinc3 wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 1:37 am
Maybe some of you have examples of things that you did to attack the clutter, or at least put and end to its growth.
Absolutely. I stopped caring about it.

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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by gm10 »

I just automate every task I need to do repeatedly, and have been keeping to common organizational practices across different (operating) systems for many years, so I don't even have to think about it.

This is nothing digital-specific. If you always put your keys in the same place you never have to search for where you put them.
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Netherprovinc3
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by Netherprovinc3 »

gm10 wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 8:46 am
This is nothing digital-specific. If you always put your keys in the same place you never have to search for where you put them.
Some of my difficulty is that there are kind of multiple places for things.
For example, investments and taxes intersect. So, I'd have separate folders for those but the fact that they intersect makes it so that there is not always a clear place for something.
That might not be the best example. But, the point is that some files can kind of be in say 4 categories at once.
Each category basically involves too much clicking to get to.
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by gm10 »

Netherprovinc3 wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 11:43 am
Some of my difficulty is that there are kind of multiple places for things.
For example, investments and taxes intersect. So, I'd have separate folders for those but the fact that they intersect makes it so that there is not always a clear place for something.
That might not be the best example. But, the point is that some files can kind of be in say 4 categories at once.
Each category basically involves too much clicking to get to.
Sure, but book-keeping was even more annoying in pre-digital times. ;)
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by Netherprovinc3 »

rene wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 8:31 am
Netherprovinc3 wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 1:37 am
Maybe some of you have examples of things that you did to attack the clutter, or at least put and end to its growth.
Absolutely. I stopped caring about it.
I think that is a reasonable approach.

To elaborate, could keep just a very small percentage of things, or have a reasonably effective way of searching some of it. Or maybe the drawback of not having something when you need it isn't that big, given the odds that you will ever need it, so overall cost is very low.
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by AZgl1500 »

due to a vehicle accident in 2008, my memory cells took a whopper of a hit.

now, if I want to "remember important things", I have to put them into a notebook...

and my choice for that job is Evernote which is cloud based.
no license required for use on 2 personal devices, but I only have it on 1 device, and that is my cellphone.
all other devices use a browser to get to it.

you must absolutely keep the password in a safe place, because they tell you up front, that they purposely will NOT assist you in trying to recover a lost account. That account is yours, and yours only, and if you loose password, you loose it all.

https://www.evernote.com/

I keep detailed notes of how to fix things on my PCs.
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by HaveaMint »

Get a large USB drive and set it up with computer specific directories in it. If you rarely use the other PC's then having the things you value on a usb drive makes it where you don't need to go to the other PC's and can be accessed from any PC.
"how do you motivate yourself to keep your digital life organized? "
Lose everything you value and you will learn to motivate.
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by Portreve »

Hey Netherprovinc3...
Netherprovinc3 wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 1:37 am
I am starting to feel overwhelmed with my digital life.
As someone who's been at this game since 1986, I've experienced the sort of "migration"-induced transitions which have led (and still lead) to the personal circumstances you've described. Given the high praise you have for this forum and members, I'd like to throw in my 2.5¢ for your consumption and that of other folks here, not so much to pontificate, but to hopefully illustrate and educate what lies at the root of my decision-making process.

It's my opinion that much of the "baggage" of migration, which basically you are kind of complaining about, can be avoided or at least mitigated.


THE PAST: [Which is often overlooked as prologue]

I got my first computer as a gift from my grandmother in 1986, which is when I started high school. It was a Macintosh Plus, and it (if I recall correctly) shipped with System 3.2/Finder 4.1¹. In the 1980s, there was no dominant computer platform as people of today would know, and even living in what I think of as the armpit of America (I don't hate Florida per se, but it's not exactly the best place, either) there were many different computer platforms represented, and between what the school had at the time and what my various high school friends had, the bulk of the platforms were represented. Word got around that I owned a Mac, and as I was the only student who had one, and at the time probably one of the few people, including adults working in the school system, who had one, I was recruited onto my school's newspaper staff. This is where I began to learn about layout and design, and started my many-decade relationship with desktop publishing. It was also during this era that I put my latent technology enthusiast interests and aptitudes to good use, exposing myself not just to graphic design, but to telecommunications, basic networking, audio digitizing and processing, troubleshooting and technical support, and probably a litany of other things not worth recounting here.

The reason I bring up my origins is by way of explaining that, personal private data aside, this is where one of the first things I collected — namely fonts — began, which in time would become a fairly major thing and something I've talked about here on LMF in the past. The relevance of this will become obvious shortly.

Over the decades, I've used 800K floppy disks, 1.4MB floppy disks, SyQuest EZ-135 cartridges, Iomega ZIP 100 cartridges, 650 MB CDs, 700 MB CDs, 4.7GB DVDs, and 8.5GB DVDs, and interspersed amongst all of this, hard drives of all kinds of capacities, along with — eventually — USB flash drives. With each era of storage media, there's been a battle of migrating data to successively higher and higher capacity media, and then different standards of media.

Also over the decades, I've used (as my main OS) just about every version of Mac OS (or what is now referred to as "Classic Mac OS"), Mac OS X 10.0 to 10.8, and I've also made use of (more for dabbling purposes, or use in workplace environments) Windows 3.1, Windows 95, 98, 98SE, ME (O-M-f'ing-G!), 2000, XP, Vista, and 7. This means I've, to start to show you the relevance of the first example, needed to deal with fonts from two different platforms and what would basically become two or three iterations of standard. It also obviously means dealing with inter-platform interoperability.

As a completely random side-note, for those not aware, it may be of interest that the Graphic Interchange Format, more commonly known as "GIF", came into existence when CompuServe got tired of having a zillion copies of the same image file, chewing up disk space like a Tribble on speed, all because each OS platform had its own (and sometimes two or three) standards for image format, none of which were interchangeable. So, they produced GIF and asked their users to switch to that because this was the first multi-platform image format standard. By switching, it no doubt saved them a tremendous amount of storage space by drastically cutting down on the number of instances of the same image being stored on their servers. [Bear this example in mind because this will be a harbinger of things to come.]


THE PRESENT (and recent past):

Everybody likes to say Microsoft brought interoperability and standardization to the computer world. That, I would argue, is utter b!&&$#!t. They didn't bring standardization or interoperability. They managed to maneuver themselves into the position of dominant platform status, effectively wiping out everyone except for Apple and those platforms used solely in business and professional situations. However, because they hijacked the computer world in this way, it means the total number of platforms people had to deal with, whether user or developer, was for the most part two, and not seven or ten or fifteen. Moreover, the 90s was the decade where there was the "new wisdom" of being able to play together instead of every platform maker running in their own direction. It was also the era of the birth of the public Internet, and a great many common — not necessarily libre — standards emerged, and has basically led (I'm oversimplifying, but this is already a beast of a post) to where we are at today, with interoperability and the mass promulgation and ubiquity of defined standards considered the rule, not the exception.

¹ It originally was the case that Apple did not release an operating system with a single version number, instead preferring to seperately enumerate the version of the base-level OS and that of the desktop, even though you could not boot the computer with simply the OS itself.
Last edited by Portreve on Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by Portreve »

PRESENT-DAY PROLOGUE:

A lot of things have come into much sharper focus as priorities for the world of technology. Without including security in this discussion (which is also obviously one of them), the three things to keep in mind are:
  1. Ubiquitious, world-wide adoption and inclusion of technology into everyday society;
  2. Desire for compatibility, interchange, and interoperability; and
  3. Desire for libre standards in light of exposed corruption and other factors.

I love technology. Obviously. I also like automation. However, I think automation has its place, and its place is not as an end-game strategy for every single problem. It's a tool, not a destination. I say that because, whether in the world of technology or in the physical, real world, everybody wants this "magic pill" solution where something else takes over and just makes everything right for them. At worst, this leads to damage and vulnerabilities, and at best this leads to mixed results. All this is to say some things will require you to roll up your sleeves and rightfully do the hard work yourself.

I had a lot of different kinds of data in my own collection, coming from days and weeks and months and decades of life, living, and being a part of the technology world. Between 2013 and 2015, I began to see I needed to move to something better, safer, and sane-r, and something which was neither Mac OS X (now "macOS") nor Windows, and that choice clearly became GNU+Linux. I picked Linux Mint after prior exposure to it, as well as many other distros, and a lot of personal evaluation of which seemed to be the most appropriate and appealing option. I view my computer as a production machine, so distros geared more for the bleeding edge and care less about stability than having the latest and greatest under-the-hood components were out. Distros with less refined desktop environments were also out, and they were out primarily because I wanted a distro which embraced the good desktop environment I wanted, instead of operating in spite of it. I also wanted one with new-enough component to be of value and something which has legs to it because, in the final analysis, I really don't want to have to keep distro-hopping. I have stuff I want to do, be it for fun or for work, and the ultimate value to me of any operating system is that it lets me get stuff done.

In knowing I was going to be making a move, I was finally forced to deal with my sprawlling accumulation of data in all kinds of crazy-ass formats. Some things simply could not be salvaged (that is, made capable of migrating) so for those category of things, I picked the stuff I needed to keep and made ZIP archives out of them. What was then left were documents (office, image, sound, etc.) which in some cases were already as portable as they could be (for instance, PDFs or straight-up text files), in some cases were not portable but could be made to be through some form of conversion (fonts, for example), and in others were portable but their formats were in one sense or another proprietary and I wanted to fully liberate them.

I had a lot of re-organizing of data because:
  1. The data was scattered across CDs, DVDs, and hard drives; and/or
  2. The data was not organized and segregated very well to begin with
This, of course, is an example of where mere automation isn't useful. Just because something is an image, for example, it does not necessarily follow that it should be in the "Pictures" area of my archive. Images belonging to layouts having to do with design projects should logically be kept with the overall project.

I made the decision that I no longer wanted to warehouse JPGs, both because of libre license issues and also because, especially for certain kinds of images, PNG represented not just a better licensing choice, but because of technical reasons. For example, PNG does a better job of maintaining image integrity despite being a lossy format; it also natively supports transparency. Neither JPG nor GIF, for a host of reasons, adequately if at all addresses these concerns.

Likewise, I made the decision that I wanted nothing to do with MP3 files except as a means-to-an-end for device compatibility. I own only one device with which I must use MP3 — the head unit in my car — and so a copy of my music collection (most of it, some things I don't really want to listen to in my car) sits on a flash drive transcoded into MP3. Otherwise, my entire collection of music is stored, with the exception of Mark J. Cairn's Airwolf Themes 2CD Collection and Jan Szulew's Aiwolf Main Themes, as FLAC. (They only distributed in lossy, and the least-objectionable format they were able to offer it in was 256 MP3.)

Additionally, I use an Android OS-based phone, and that platform natively supports FLAC and OGG (and many others) so all sounds I have for my phone are either OGG, or ones I've produced are kept as FLAC and transcoded to OGG to save space on the phone.

The reason for preferring FLAC to anything else is actually simple, and two-fold. First, it's a compressed but non-lossy format, and second, it's also a libre format. Back in 2013 when I began researching this, I learned about FLAC and OGG and quickly determined their respective benefits were non-negotiables for me. All my music comes from my CDs which are self-ripped, transcoded from the resultant WAV files into FLAC, and then I handle all of the meta-data acquisition and integration myself. I leave nothing to chance, and I am likewise beholden to nobody else. It also means that whenever I transcode a copy of the music into some other format, I get perfect end products every time.

As for fonts...

The history of fonts is a long and interesting (if a bit arduous) one, and one which I will not recount here. However, historically, there have been two categories of font files: strictly fixed-resolution bitmap files compatible exclusively with different platforms, and vector-based ones used for more professional situations, but yet also ultimately platform-specific. Because of this platform-specific characteristic, that meant if someone had both Macs and PCs in an office, then you would need both Mac OS and Windows versions of the exact same fonts. It also meant that interchanging of documents between platforms was often a pain because internal designations for fonts were not common or necessarily compatible, and so one would have to manually and with much effort of labor re-assign text from one naming convention of a font to another naming convention. There were work-arounds for this, but nothing that in the modern era anyone here would consider "clean" or ideal. Also, the way text itself was handled was very much platform-specific¹, and given that the cradle of computer technology was the western world, that meant supporting different alphabets² was something of a non-starter, and eventually led to what can only be described as kludges and very, very unclean methods.

Several organizations worked to try and tackle this, but there were two different areas which needed to be tackled. The first of which was supporting a larger number of characters so that multiple alphabets could be used without any kind of fooling around. If you've ever heard or seen the term "UNICODE", that's what we're talking about³. The second was to have a unified file format which would also include vector outline data, basically the most current iteration of Adobe's pretty much industry-standard PostScript, and this collectively meant the user had a one-stop-shop to have a font which could be used on any system, had support for effectively any amount of characters, and which also could be used to render cleanly and nicely on modern systems which had long ago included font outline data rendering into their display subsystems. This standard was called OpenType (.OTF) and along with modern Truetype, is what is now found on all current systems.

So, all that in mind, I had to work my way through Macintosh PostScript Type 1 (many years ago I took the very few PostScript Type 3 fonts I had and converted them into Type 1), Windows PostScript Type 1, and a few Macintosh Truetype and Windows Truetype fonts, and cleaned them all up and made them into OpenType fonts (personally, I've never really cared for Truetype). My font collection also includes a wide variety of libre-licensed fonts, including ones from The League of Movable Type, SIL, and others.

¹ The first "standardization" was arguably going from a host of different character standards to the American Standard Code for Information Interchange, or ASCII. However, ASCII is limited to 256 characters, numbered 0 through 255, and this includes every kind of control character, and what's left for printable characters is considerably less than that.

² Back in the day, the way non-roman alphabets were handled was to arbitrarily assign other characters to the same slots that roman characters normally occupied. The problem is that a document so composed would open up as gibberish when a person using the "other" alphabet on their system opened the file on their system. There were some other workarounds for this, but none were all that good.

³ Later versions of Truetype incorporate support for UNICODE as well.
Last edited by Portreve on Tue Dec 10, 2019 3:57 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by Portreve »

LESSONS LEARNED: [or, What's The Point of This Post.]

There is simply no getting around having a lot of situational awareness in the world, whether it has to do with technology or not. Where once the technology world seemed to be a respite from the cold reality of the bitterness of the real world, it's really no longer a world apart from it, but a world joined at the hip to it. It's to the individual user's benefit, or their detriment, based on how they choose to deal with it. Personally, I prefer to leverage the capabilities of technology, rather than be subjugated to it, or more precisely to the whims of corporations and governments and what they decide is good for you, or is against their interests over and above the objections the user might raise if they were aware of things. One would hope that at least most of the GNU+Linux community is here for that reason.

What I would offer to you, Netherprovinc3, is this:

How you handle your data is up to you. How you sort and organize it is up to you. However you choose to do it, I would advise a very careful and thoughtful approach to keeping it very well organized, and organized such that you are not dependent upon any software to get it that way or keep it that way or, most definitely, to have access to it provided to you. The more you can do for yourself, the better off you are.

However, while you are at it and bothering to deal with it, take time to modernize the file formats being used, to whatever extent you can, so that you make it as compatible and future-proof as possible. Even if you don't go to the elaborate lengths which I have, at least put some amount of time into understanding what's going on out there in the world, and what "best practices" might mean for your specific data archives.

It's a real shame that the bulk of my data collection is, by definition, copyright-restricted, because I would love nothing more than to help others not have to reinvent the wheel. However, music and fonts and videos are not unrestricted, and cannot merely be re-distributed carte blanche. But, if at least you know there are things which can be done, that hopefully puts you ahead of the game.


All the best.

Portreve


P.S.: As for "motivation", the only thing which motivates me any longer in life, apart from some sort of personal interest in a given subject or discipline, is independence and liberty, and therefore anything which enables me to be free of restriction and free of dependence upon another individual or entity motivates me.
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by cliffcoggin »

The need for organisational skills is not unique to computers. If you are organised with paperwork you can apply the same skills to digital. The only tips I can give you are to simplify, be ruthless, and be disciplined.

In your place my first step would be to get rid of all the rarely used computers, and consolidate all data into one or at most two.
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by Portreve »

cliffcoggin wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:18 pm
The need for organisational skills is not unique to computers. If you are organised with paperwork you can apply the same skills to digital. The only tips I can give you are to simplify, be ruthless, and be disciplined.

In your place my first step would be to get rid of all the rarely used computers, and consolidate all data into one or at most two.
+1
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by rene »

Netherprovinc3 wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 11:53 am
I think that is a reasonable approach.
Thanks for taking my post in the spirit in which it was it was intended: seriously. I used to be massively anally retentive about organizing my computer(s) but noticed at some point that spending, say, ten times the amount of time on organizing than on ever using that which was organized just didn't make a heck of a lot of sense.

Although admittedly minus some things I do still enjoy organizing such as a fairly massive music collection I these days often just don't bother any more. Freedom from my inner bookkeeper has been an unmixed blessing...

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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by meToo »

Humans are turning into data junkies, gradually and without realisation. My data archives go back to 1981, in all sorts of formats and on all sorts of media, most of which is completely useless now. Why do I keep it? Because one day (unlikely), I believe someone might be in need of it! None of this digital stuff is indexed and would waste lots of time trying to find individual bits which I know exist 'somewhere'. On top of this, everything necessary in life has been moved to the internet, involving excess time on-line with dozens of digital accounts and passwords. Every human above a certain age has to own a number of digital devices to be able to function so no wonder energy consumption rises inexorably as a side effect of ones digital life. And to make matters worse we are forced into this data life and its hidden costs, not forgetting the outlay for the digital devices. Years ago tales of computerisation making life simpler, easier and cheaper were freely peddled - what has happened is the opposite.
Don't get me wrong, I could not live without my digital life (which does NOT involve any social media) simply because everything has gone on-line, creating a demand for yet more data storage. And in reality I enjoy it!
Disorganization also drifts into my interest in photography, arduino, ESP 8266 and other devices which need to be programmed or scripted. Depending upon my location at any one time, I have multiple copies of programs/scripts which I forget to synchronise - I must keep to one machine, one backup device before my head bursts.
Loss of data has become a common event, health affecting in some cases and must be overcome by (note to self) serious ORGANISATION. :)
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by AZgl1500 »

meToo wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 5:35 pm
Humans are turning into data junkies, gradually and without realisation. My data archives go back to 1981, in all sorts of formats and on all sorts of media, most of which is completely useless now. Why do I keep it? Because one day (unlikely), I believe someone might be in need of it! None of this digital stuff is indexed and would waste lots of time trying to find individual bits which I know exist 'somewhere'.
I too, have stuff going back 20 years, including all of my IRS tax filings.
when they are now telling us, that 3 years is enough.... we used to be told we HAD to keep 7 years of Taxes on file at home.

sigh!
I still have all of the old hard drives that I have had running since day one.
just for grins, I started plugging them into my desktop HDD USB adapter and looking to see what is on them.... lots of stuff I have long ago forgotten about.... "ought to dump that, nah, better hold onto it". and it has been 10+ years since the last time that HDD was powered up. :lol:
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by Portreve »

cliffcoggin wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:18 pm
The only tips I can give you are to simplify, be ruthless, and be disciplined.
I know my prior posts kind of turned into a book, and I apologize if that has turned anyone here off, but I just wanted to further echo cliffcoggin's points by adding that one of my objectives in the organization and migration project that I talked about at length above was that I had a lot of different kinds of data in a lot of different formats, and so one of objectives was to simplify and minimize the number of different file formats. All of my fixed resolution images are now PNGs. All of my vector images are SVG. Anything that's of a word processing document nature is now either a text document for materials with no formatting, or LibreOffice Writer for those with formatting data, and so forth.

This simplification makes future support so much easier because I've also picked formats which are open standards.
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by absque fenestris »

As far as digital organization is concerned, I painfully miss a function as it was given in the classic Apple Menu: there I had stored the essential folders (e.g. studio/customer/order... or pictures/internet/animals... as an alias).
With the even extending tree view one was in no time at the searched file. The condition was that you did not mess with the title of the individual files. For letters, invoices, offers, always first the date (Year, Month, Day) then the subject.
Under OSX there were XMenues which also had freely configurable folders, and offered similar functions. To date I have found nothing similar under Linux (...and certainly not under Windows).
I am always amazed, under which stupid titles data arrive in my studio or as the dear customers store all data crisscrossed over their desktop. And if you says something about folders and subfolders they get tired immediately. The greatest heroes store important data in the Recycle Bin: "No, the Recycle Bin must not be emptied! Oh God, you emptied it?"
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by AZgl1500 »

absque fenestris wrote:
Thu Dec 12, 2019 8:16 am
As far as digital organization is concerned, I painfully miss a function as it was given in the classic Apple Menu: there I had stored the essential folders (e.g. studio/customer/order... or pictures/internet/animals... as an alias).
With the even extending tree view one was in no time at the searched file. The condition was that you did not mess with the title of the individual files. For letters, invoices, offers, always first the date (Year, Month, Day) then the subject.
Under OSX there were XMenues which also had freely configurable folders, and offered similar functions. To date I have found nothing similar under Linux (...and certainly not under Windows).
I am always amazed, under which stupid titles data arrive in my studio or as the dear customers store all data crisscrossed over their desktop. And if you says something about folders and subfolders they get tired immediately. The greatest heroes store important data in the Recycle Bin: "No, the Recycle Bin must not be emptied! Oh God, you emptied it?"
I have created Windows and Linux folders/filenames just like you suggest, for a long time.
Using Year/Month/Date as the name preface makes it extremely easy to back track 2 or 3 years and find a file.

With Disk Images though, I do it backwards, with the Date/Time as the suffix, the folder names correlate to the PC that the image belongs to.
Linux Mint 19.3 Cinnamon

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absque fenestris
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Re: Digital disorganization

Post by absque fenestris »

AZgl1500 wrote:
Thu Dec 12, 2019 9:01 am
...
With Disk Images though, I do it backwards, with the Date/Time as the suffix, the folder names correlate to the PC that the image belongs to.
You brought me to a reminder: in the classic Mac, you could create an Alias from a Floppy Disk, for example. When you click on this Alias, the message appeared: Please insert Diskette xxx. This was very practical with the hard disk sizes at that time. And here, too, the title was decisive...
Linux Mint 18.3 Sylvia (Mate) 32-bit - Acer D250 Netbook (Intel Atom N270, 2 GB RAM, 120 GB SSD)
Linux Mint 17.3 Rosa (Mate) 64-bit - MacBook Pro 15" (Intel Core2 Duo, 8 GB RAM, 240 GB SSD) - with some separation difficulties...

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