Linux Security

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Aging Technogeek
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Linux Security

Post by Aging Technogeek » Thu May 06, 2010 9:21 pm

I was out web browsing and found this article. An excellent discussion of Linux security. All new Linux users should read this.
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FedoraRefugee
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Re: Linux Security

Post by FedoraRefugee » Thu May 06, 2010 10:12 pm

I am disappointed that they nowhere mention secure passwords and not running as root. But otherwise it is good information. It is never wise to become too complacent or to think that your computer cannot be exploited.

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Aging Technogeek
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Re: Linux Security

Post by Aging Technogeek » Thu May 06, 2010 10:18 pm

You know, you are right about passwords and running as root. I guess I have become so used to those facets of Linux security that is like an old habit. I do it almost without thinking and assume others do to.

But you are right, other than those issues, there is a lot of good information here.
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distro hopper
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Re: Linux Security

Post by distro hopper » Thu May 06, 2010 10:25 pm

It's not a horrible article.. but not that great either. It's a nice confidence boost to linux newcomers, thats about it.
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randomizer
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Re: Linux Security

Post by randomizer » Fri May 07, 2010 3:36 am

Secure passwords... mmm yes that's not something I take seriously. Well, I understand that it is good practice, but I'd be too prone to forgetting it.

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rich_roast
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Re: Linux Security

Post by rich_roast » Fri May 07, 2010 4:51 am

There's an app for that.

I use keepassx but there are others.

Another method is to create phonetic passwords (ones you can pronounce). Keepass's generator can make these for you. They're easier to remember, for those passwords you really don't want to write down anywhere.

Keepassx can also be made to only open a password database given the presence of a key file somewhere; I keep mine on my usb stick meaning that even with access to my desktop an intruder can't easily get into the database, even granted they somehow manage to guess or crack the master password, which would come as a surprise to me.

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Re: Linux Security

Post by FedoraRefugee » Fri May 07, 2010 9:07 am

About passwords;

For the average home user you do not need something as secure as Ft. Knox. But you should take it one step above "JoeRoot" or "aaaaaa". Pick a phrase you can remember but that no one will guess. Use a password level that corresponds to your security threat level. If you do not ssh then there is little to fear from a brute force attack. Probably your biggest threat is your wife wanting to see your IM list or your **** history. But it is still a good idea to use a password that your next door neighbor is not going to guess in 4 tries.

For root find a random literary quote that mixes caps and lowercase and it helps to mix in a few numbers. Nothing significant, but something you will remember.

This2shallpass

For online have several levels of passwords. My forum password is not hard to guess. More important passwords get stronger.

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DrHu
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Re: Linux Security

Post by DrHu » Fri May 07, 2010 4:16 pm

For the paranoid amongst us, only a OTP (One time pad) will do
http://linuxpoison.blogspot.com/2009/04 ... -time.html
http://www.lockergnome.com/gnomewriter/ ... son-paper/

And then also encrypt your files in some manner, /home is enough usually (but you could include /tmp and swap, if it is being used)
  • --run bleachbit or shred to clean up files or don't save any logs in /var/log
    --make sure your bowser of choice isn't recording cookies, such as flash lso data
    --etc etc.

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