What Does "Closed" Mean on GitHub? [SOLVED]

Questions about the project and the distribution - obviously no support questions here please
Post Reply
User avatar
Radish
Level 4
Level 4
Posts: 316
Joined: Sun May 12, 2013 11:20 pm

What Does "Closed" Mean on GitHub? [SOLVED]

Post by Radish » Wed Nov 25, 2015 10:20 am

I made a suggestion for a small improvement to Cinnamon at GitHub: https://github.com/linuxmint/Cinnamon/issues/4849

At first I thought that the idea was being accepted - the first comment made seemed favourable. However, today I got an email and now see that the idea has been "Closed" on GitHub. Problem is I'm not sure what closed means. Does it mean my idea has, now, been rejected (and so won't progress any further)?
Last edited by Radish on Thu Dec 10, 2015 1:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Mint 17.3 x64 Cinnamon - Rosa
When stating what version of Mint you are using remember to include the "Edition". Is it "Cinnamon", "Mate", "KDE" or "XFCE"? This helps others help you.

User avatar
xenopeek
Level 24
Level 24
Posts: 24100
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2011 3:58 am
Location: The Netherlands

Re: What Does "Closed" Mean on GitHub?

Post by xenopeek » Wed Nov 25, 2015 12:06 pm

Closed means no further commenting on the issue is possible. JosephMcc referenced your issue from a commit he made on his fork of Cinnamon: https://github.com/JosephMcc/Cinnamon/c ... 88c27ff6d1. He implemented your suggestion there. Now what needs to happen is for one of the lead Cinnamon developers to review JosephMcc's commit and determine whether they want this in Cinnamon as written. Perhaps JosephMcc needs to make some more changes before it can be accepted into Cinnamon.

This is how collaborative development on GitHub works. A smaller group of developers has permissions to make changes to the project itself. Other developers fork (make a copy) of the project to their own workspace, make changes there, and submit a "pull request" (PR) to the project to include their changes back in the project. This way all developers can work independently on the code and a smaller group of developers stays in control of what goes into the project and what not (keeping an eye on quality, changes fitting with the roadmap, offering feedback on changes if improvements are needed before they can be accepted, and so on).
Image

User avatar
killer de bug
Level 14
Level 14
Posts: 5415
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 1:49 pm
Location: Leuven, Belgium

Re: What Does "Closed" Mean on GitHub?

Post by killer de bug » Wed Nov 25, 2015 12:55 pm

It was merged 4 hours ago and therefore it will probably makes his way to LM 17.3 Rosa.
If it ain't broke, fix it until it is.

User avatar
Radish
Level 4
Level 4
Posts: 316
Joined: Sun May 12, 2013 11:20 pm

Re: What Does "Closed" Mean on GitHub?

Post by Radish » Wed Nov 25, 2015 1:17 pm

Thanks very much Xenopeek. I think I half-understand what you are saying. Could you please clarify for me a little more:

When you say:
JosephMcc referenced your issue from a commit he made on his fork of Cinnamon
are you saying the following:

JosephMcc made an alteration to his (test) version of Cinnamon such that he wanted to test the idea (i.e. code for it and see if it worked). Once he did that he then submitted his code/response - and that is what is being referred to as a "commit"?

Last question. If, at the end of the day, the developers agree on what code they are going to use to implement the idea - so the idea is actually going to be implemented - how is that intention to implement that change/feature signalled at GitHub? What kind of a label does it get? "Approved"? "Implement"? ("Whatever" - what is the label? How does it get categorised? How does the person who submitted the idea visit GitHub and know that the idea is going to be definitely implemented?)

(Sorry if these seem like stupid questions. I'm just trying to understand how GitHub works, and how to work with it. A webpage at GitHub with a flowchart display illustrating for newbies how GitHub and developers work together, and defining the terminology used at GitHub, would be helpful.)
Mint 17.3 x64 Cinnamon - Rosa
When stating what version of Mint you are using remember to include the "Edition". Is it "Cinnamon", "Mate", "KDE" or "XFCE"? This helps others help you.

User avatar
xenopeek
Level 24
Level 24
Posts: 24100
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2011 3:58 am
Location: The Netherlands

Re: What Does "Closed" Mean on GitHub?

Post by xenopeek » Wed Nov 25, 2015 2:06 pm

On your issue https://github.com/linuxmint/Cinnamon/issues/4849 you see the comment "JosephMcc referenced this issue from a commit in JosephMcc/Cinnamon". That says JosephMcc committed a change on his fork (his copy) of Cinnamon.

Underneath that comment it says "launcher-editor: Implement the idea in linuxmint#4849 makes more sens…". If you click on that you go to JosephMcc's copy of Cinnamon: https://github.com/JosephMcc/Cinnamon/c ... 88c27ff6d1. It displays the commit there (the comment for the code change, plus what code was added and removed).

Underneath the headline on that commit you see the link to another issue, "desktop-editor (#4863)": https://github.com/linuxmint/Cinnamon/pull/4863. That is a pull request made to the Cinnamon project. This says "JospehMcc made this change to his fork of Cinnamon for this reason, please pull it into the Cinnamon project". As you can see on the pull request it was merged which means it is code that has been accepted into the Cinnamon project. The line underneath the heading says as much "clefebvre merged 1 commit into linuxmint:master from JosephMcc:desktop-editor". So your change is now in the master branch which means that in some time when a new version is released this change will also be available in Cinnamon for users.

I don't know when. Looking at tags https://github.com/linuxmint/Cinnamon/tags the latest is from 5 days ago 2.8.5. Your change might make it into 2.8.6 (which generally would only include bugfixes and very minor changes) or it might get postponed to 3.0 (the next big feature release). The change is accepted though, you're now just waiting for a release to be done that includes your change.

As for GitHub flowcharts and the like:
- Terminology list: https://help.github.com/articles/github-glossary/
- Interactive flowchart on the "GitHub Flow" (click the arrow icon to the right of the text to advance): https://guides.github.com/introduction/flow/
- A guide to contributing: https://guides.github.com/activities/co ... en-source/
- There are lots more guides: https://guides.github.com/ and help: https://help.github.com/
Perhaps this free online training would be a match for understanding more? https://training.github.com/classes/introduction/. Though I guess it's a little less focused on contributors that report issues and want to track those and more on budding developers. But at one hour and zero cost, perhaps worth your time.
Image

User avatar
Radish
Level 4
Level 4
Posts: 316
Joined: Sun May 12, 2013 11:20 pm

Re: What Does "Closed" Mean on GitHub?

Post by Radish » Wed Nov 25, 2015 2:26 pm

Thanks very much for the detailed response xenopeek. I'll click my way through that lot when I get couple of free hours to do so.
Mint 17.3 x64 Cinnamon - Rosa
When stating what version of Mint you are using remember to include the "Edition". Is it "Cinnamon", "Mate", "KDE" or "XFCE"? This helps others help you.

User avatar
MtnDewManiac
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1456
Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2013 5:18 pm
Location: United States

Re: What Does "Closed" Mean on GitHub?

Post by MtnDewManiac » Thu Dec 10, 2015 1:25 pm

Yes, thank you xenopeek (and Radish, as well, for providing an actual example). Because of this thread, I now have a much clearer understanding of how the process works.

[EDIT: This message successfully posted. However, There was 1/3 of a screen of error(?) messages on top of the "posting" screen. I didn't manage to get a shot of it (my screenshooter time option was set to a five-second delay :roll: ) and only noticed the word "strict," lol. Therefore, I'm just editing the post in order to see if I can get the error(?) text lines to display again - I am ready this time.]

Regards,
MDM
Mint 18 Xfce 4.12.

If guns kill people, then pencils misspell words, cars make people drive drunk, and spoons made Rosie O'Donnell fat.

Post Reply

Return to “Non-technical Questions”