Do we REALLY need MINT?

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drydenp
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Re: Do we REALLY need MINT?

Post by drydenp » Wed Jul 20, 2016 2:36 pm

MintBean wrote:Computers seem to have become pretty much a fashion accessory for many these days. Personally I find using tablets an arduous experience and I expect a lot of the reasons they are so popular is down to 'virus free' Android or iOS vs the only alternative many know- Windows.

Unfortunately, I see laptop and desktop machines becoming largely relegated to business and the price rising as a result.

Back to the OP, let me turn the question around- Do we REALLY need Cinnamon desktop on anything other than Mint which came up with it in the first place? Actually I don't really think like that as we all have our preferences and the beauty of open source is the ability to 'have it your way.'
Thank you for your reponse, mr. BG405.

It's true that the desktop has lost its appeal in large part perhaps due to the advent of the loss of functionality and convenience that has seen current Windows versions do and have; coupled with MacOS not really being a good replacement for many, and so people just don't use computers AT ALL anymore.

How odd is that! Windows is quietly losing its appeal to a great extent! In order to solve the problem of losing appeal (that was Microsofts reason for doing it). People have become bored with their tablets and now don't do anything useful on a computer anymore at all.

They don't have the technology or the knowhow to make it work for them, and neither do I I must say. (Is the OP still here?).

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MintBean
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Re: Do we REALLY need MINT?

Post by MintBean » Wed Jul 20, 2016 2:51 pm

You may not have the tech, but you have the curiosity......therefore you can gain the tech. Many can't be bothered.... which is fair enough I suppose!

What's BG405?

all41
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Re: Do we REALLY need MINT?

Post by all41 » Wed Jul 20, 2016 3:14 pm

People have become bored with their tablets and now don't do anything useful on a computer anymore at all.

They don't have the technology or the knowhow to make it work for them
True -- so true. I am confronted with this daily--it's a point and click world now--if that's not an option then it's a no spin.
and especially so among the younger set

Who would have guessed we would be typing with our thumbs

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drydenp
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Re: Do we REALLY need MINT?

Post by drydenp » Wed Jul 20, 2016 3:28 pm

MintBean wrote:You may not have the tech, but you have the curiosity......therefore you can gain the tech. Many can't be bothered.... which is fair enough I suppose!

What's BG405?
Oh, that was the user above you ;-). I don't think I can gain the technology anymore, it's too late for me. (Real life circumstances, I don't know).
all41 wrote:
People have become bored with their tablets and now don't do anything useful on a computer anymore at all.

They don't have the technology or the knowhow to make it work for them
True -- so true. I am confronted with this daily--it's a point and click world now--if that's not an option then it's a no spin.
and especially so among the younger set

Who would have guessed we would be typing with our thumbs
Yeah, it degenerates, doesn't it. Society is regressing as a whole, I think. I wanted to be, I was planning to be, and I was working to be a replacement myself, that would introduce something that would be orthogonal to the developments of old. Yet now we see that really development really still takes place on a straight line. However. If you get to the top, after that, you can really only go down.

If anything and if I live long enough and free enough to do anything, I think that:
  • Anything new will require grass-roots, and not hierarchy from the top
  • Currently Linux is a lot of hierarchy from the top, and not very much grass-roots
  • Linux Mint is small enough to have enough contact with its userbase to say that yes, we really do need Mint :P

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Arch_Enemy
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Re: Do we REALLY need MINT?

Post by Arch_Enemy » Wed Jul 20, 2016 9:55 pm

all41 wrote:
People have become bored with their tablets and now don't do anything useful on a computer anymore at all.

They don't have the technology or the knowhow to make it work for them
True -- so true. I am confronted with this daily--it's a point and click world now--if that's not an option then it's a no spin.
and especially so among the younger set

Who would have guessed we would be typing with our thumbs

And glued to a 3" screen?

Saw some kids riding their bikes into a very busy parking lot, and all three of them had their noses buried in their phones. One almost got hit. Good grief.
I have travelled 35629424162.9 miles in my lifetime

One thing I would suggest, create a partition a ~28G partition as /. Partition the rest as /Home.
When the system fails, reinstall and use the exact same username and all your 'stuff' comes back to you.

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linuxviolin
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Re: Do we REALLY need MINT?

Post by linuxviolin » Thu Jul 21, 2016 9:44 am

drydenp wrote:I don't know about Manjaro but that is the Debian model.
Debian? lol Manjaro is Arch-based. If you consider Debian is like Arch then OK, Manjaro is like Debian...

About Manjaro repos model (from the Manjaro Wiki):
One of the many features that sets Manjaro apart from other Arch-based distributions is that it uses its own dedicated software repositories, rather than relying on those provided by Arch itself. In fact, to ensure continued stability and reliability, Manjaro actually uses three distinct types of software repositories:



## Unstable repositories: These are used to store software packages that have known or suspected stability and/or compatibility issues. This software may therefore be subject to patching by the Manjaro developers prior to being released to the testing repositories. Although the very latest software will be located here, using the unstable respositories may consequently break your system!



## Testing repositories: These are used to store patched software packages from the unstable repositories, as well other new software releases that are considered at least sufficiently stable. This software will be subject to further checks by developers and testers for potential bugs and/or stability issues, prior to being released to the stable repositories for public use.



## Stable repositories: These are the default repositories used by Manjaro systems to provide updates and downloads to the general user base.


A consequence of using this model is that Manjaro's default stable repositories will be updated slightly later than Arch's, in order to accommodate the patching and testing processes. However, it is possible to bypass the stable repositories completely by enabling direct access to the testing repositories instead. Also, experienced users may wish to bypass both the stable repositories and testing repositories completely by enabling direct access to the unstable repositories instead.
drydenp wrote:Debian Stable is known to be that distro that has libraries so old that you cannot run anything on it that was produced in the last century (those were words by Linus Torvalds).
What you don't have with Arch, and so with Manjaro, even with the Stable repos...
drydenp wrote:Testing? Unstable? Who wants that? I don't want to be a tester, but I want to have reasonably recent programs. Err, not possible with Debian.
When I used Debian, I always was going with Testing. And as you, I am not a tester. Testing is more stable than a few years ago. At least, it was when I used. Currently, I don't know as I no more use it since a few years.
drydenp wrote:Now I can run a server on Debian just fine. It is my preferred system for a server, and I have two of those.
I didn't talk about server.
drydenp wrote:When software is released it is supposed to already be tested.
Supposed, maybe, but nevertheless it remains often bugs, problems...
drydenp wrote:There is also a difference between libraries and applications. Libraries are allowed and are supposed to be "behind the times".
With Arch, and so Manjaro, both are updated but with the small delay for supplemental testing of Manjaro Stable, you can be sure, or almost (100% never exist), to have something roughly stable. What is not the case with Arch which releases all the packages immediately.

For recent apps on old librairies you could also try CentOS... :wink:
K.I.S.S. ===> "Keep It Simple, Stupid"
"Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication." (Leonardo da Vinci)
"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler." (Albert Einstein)

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