Which Linux for very old PC (dual-core CPU with 1GB ram)

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old_noob
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Re: Which Linux for very old PC (dual-core CPU with 1GB ram)

Post by old_noob »

Antix might be a good choice for very old hardware:

https://antixlinux.com/download/
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151tom
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Re: Which Linux for very old PC (dual-core CPU with 1GB ram)

Post by 151tom »

old_noob wrote:
Tue Jul 20, 2021 5:38 pm
Antix might be a good choice for very old hardware:

https://antixlinux.com/download/
Antix is great for old hardware however same problem exists with the browsers making the Linux experience painful with only 1,0 GB of memory.
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Re: Which Linux for very old PC (dual-core CPU with 1GB ram)

Post by Mint Leaf »

Termy wrote:
Thu Jul 15, 2021 6:12 am
Mint Leaf wrote:
Thu Jul 15, 2021 6:02 am
...
I used to build and share Debian packages over at GitHub. I would constantly update an 'md5sums' file, in which a list of file sums could be stored for later file verification. Eventually, I decided to stop doing that, because ultimately, if someone did somehow gain unauthorized access to the Debian packages, they too could tamper with the 'md5sums' file. This, presumably, is why we sign files, making use of something like GPG. I vaguely remember reading or hearing about how the Linux Mint devs came to the same conclusion, regarding their ISOs.

You might find this helpful:
https://www.gnupg.org/gph/en/manual/x135.html wrote:A digital signature certifies and timestamps a document. If the document is subsequently modified in any way, a verification of the signature will fail. A digital signature can serve the same purpose as a hand-written signature with the additional benefit of being tamper-resistant. The GnuPG source distribution, for example, is signed so that users can verify that the source code has not been modified since it was packaged.

Creating and verifying signatures uses the public/private keypair in an operation different from encryption and decryption. A signature is created using the private key of the signer. The signature is verified using the corresponding public key. For example, Alice would use her own private key to digitally sign her latest submission to the Journal of Inorganic Chemistry. The associate editor handling her submission would use Alice's public key to check the signature to verify that the submission indeed came from Alice and that it had not been modified since Alice sent it. A consequence of using digital signatures is that it is difficult to deny that you made a digital signature since that would imply your private key had been compromised.
I think I understand now.

The sha256 & md5 files can be stored on 3rd party websites because when the developer creates a piece of software they use a "private key" to make the sha256 (and/or) md5 file which is based on the original piece of software and the value of this "private key".

The end users then can check if the software is the original released file by comparing that file vs the sha256 (and/or) md5 file(s).

The sha256 (and/or) md5 themselves are then also checked vs the "Public key" which is a pair to the "Private Key" the sha256 (and/or) md5 file were created with.

This means that even if the sha256 (and/or) md5 file are on a 3rd party site they are safe from tampering as if changed they would no longer match the "Public key".

So only the "Public Key" needs to be obtained from a developer's official site.

On the " https://linuxmint.com/verify.php " page if I download the sha256sum.txt.gpg file it is the "Public key" that can be used to verify the sha256 for any version of Linux Mint 17 and higher?


Do I have that right?


MAlfare wrote:
Thu Jul 15, 2021 11:04 am
I have such a machine here, running LM 19.3 MATE 64 bit.
As the old Nvidia graphics card is only supported by a driver, that is not compatible with newer kernels, I have to set NOMODESET as kernel option in /etc/default/grub.
I've seen other people mentioning that if an older drivers is not supported that NOMODESET is a solution.

What is NOMODESET and how does it work?

It would be nice to be able to access the graphic card's power again instead of making the CPU do all the work.


The "System Monitor" gives the graphics card details of "Graphics: "ATI RV370" under the Hardware section, so I think the computer has one of THESE installed.


MAlfare wrote:
Thu Jul 15, 2021 11:04 am
What does
can't handle 19-20.
mean in detail?
It means that it takes forever to load any program and low powered graphical programs run with stuttering to a point that they are almost unworkable. They do run though, it is just very choppy.

As Mint 18 ran the same programs fine on that machine I'm assuming it is an issue with a lack of RAM vs an increased demand from the newer version of Linux Mint.


Tolayon wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 10:20 am
1 GB of Ram is really low these days; at least you should try to uprade it to 2 GB if that's possible.

But if that's not an option, I would just add another candidate for a usecase like yours (since honestly, any version of Mint, even older and with Xfce only, will struggle on such an old machine).
It may not be as beginner-friendly as mint, but still a solid OS for very low-spec PCs:

Raspberry Pi Desktop, formerly known as Raspbian X86:
https://www.raspberrypi.org/software/ra ... i-desktop/
Thank you for pointing that one out I'll add it to the list.

I wouldn't have considered an OS based on the single-board computer Raspberry Pi for a desktop.

If it is light weight enough to run on that, the old computer should definitely have enough power to run it.


MartyMint wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 10:05 pm
Relegate some old piece of junk to install Windows on and run Mint on your best machine.
Soar with the eagles.
I agree completely and already have mint on my best computer.

I'm trying to resurrect a different much older computer and run a few mostly equally old programs off it.

(Maybe even fire up Castle of the Winds via WINE as it amuses me greatly that Windows 3.1 programs can be made to run on Linux when the more modern Windows versions cannot make them work.)


BeyondLies_MintForum wrote:
Tue Jul 20, 2021 1:40 pm
My experience is as follows. Even with a SSD and >=3GB of RAM, some (bloated) websites, and some videos, run irritatingly poorly on machines with CPUs and/or graphics chips that are underpowered by today's standards. The processors I have in mind are dual-core (or single core) running at lower that 2.5GHz (or, for processors made in the last decade, lower than about 2.0GHz).
Fortunately the one in the old machine is running at "2.80 GHz x2" which I think means it is a dual-core CPU.

But I know what you mean. Even on Mint 18 I remember it struggled with more than one browser tab open.

old_noob wrote:
Tue Jul 20, 2021 5:38 pm
Antix might be a good choice for very old hardware:

https://antixlinux.com/download/
Thank you for the suggestion.

Antix's minimum and suggested system requirements look pretty good.

Tolayon wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 10:20 am
1 GB of Ram is really low these days; at least you should try to uprade it to 2 GB if that's possible.
151tom wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 10:23 pm
Most lightweight distros will run OK on it however the browser is what's going to make it painful with only 1.0 GB of memory.
ivar wrote:
Tue Jul 20, 2021 6:31 am
^ My findings exactly,
151tom wrote:
Tue Jul 20, 2021 6:18 pm
Antix is great for old hardware however same problem exists with the browsers making the Linux experience painful with only 1,0 GB of memory.
It sounds like I'm going to have to make it a long term goal to hunt down some old RAM and try increasing it to the max the board supports.

Does anyone have any places they suggest purchasing old parts from?



Linux OS for older hardware links:
ivar
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Re: Which Linux for very old PC (dual-core CPU with 1GB ram)

Post by ivar »

Chris Barnatt / ExplainingComputers testin light distros on a Asus EEE 901:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJcWcQ8ew6Q
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Re: Which Linux for very old PC (dual-core CPU with 1GB ram)

Post by Termy »

Mint Leaf wrote:
Wed Jul 21, 2021 5:32 am
...
Yeah, pretty much. Some projects don't bother with sum checking and instead encourage the user to check the GPG signatures, such as with the kernel, because the kernel is within an XZ Tar archive. For a project with multiple separate files which don't make sense to be combined in some sort of archive, I suppose it makes more sense to check sums and then check the signature of the sum file.
Confused? Try this guide to the Linux Mint Support Forums!

I'm Terminalforlife (LL) on YouTube and terminalforlife on GitHub.
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151tom
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Re: Which Linux for very old PC (dual-core CPU with 1GB ram)

Post by 151tom »

Mint Leaf wrote:
Wed Jul 21, 2021 5:32 am
Does anyone have any places they suggest purchasing old parts from?
I've bought a lot of memory from Ebay and never have had any bad problems or issues.

Make sure to check out the sellers reviews and what others have posted about their buying experiences from the seller you might be considering.

Make certain to understand exactly what you are ordering and return policy or any warranty.
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Re: Which Linux for very old PC (dual-core CPU with 1GB ram)

Post by DisturbedDragon »

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Re: Which Linux for very old PC (dual-core CPU with 1GB ram)

Post by Hoser Rob »

151tom wrote:
Tue Jul 20, 2021 6:18 pm
old_noob wrote:
Tue Jul 20, 2021 5:38 pm
Antix might be a good choice for very old hardware:

https://antixlinux.com/download/
Antix is great for old hardware however same problem exists with the browsers making the Linux experience painful with only 1,0 GB of memory.
Yes but what distro would be any better?

I'd also recommend Antix simply because their support forum is actually pretty good and they don't use systemd, which has slowed down most recent distros (ubuntu/mint included) recently.

But it's true that while a distro like antix will run pretty well on old/weak hardware, that doesn't mean that modern app software will necessariy.
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