Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

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miclis
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Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by miclis »

Hello

I have been using Linux for nearly two years. During this time, I've been learning more and more about the system. I've read (or sometimes just skimmed) a few books about Linux and recently I finished the Introduction to Linux course by Linux Foundation. The course covered many topics such as: installation, using GUI, finding documentation, using terminal, file operations, text editors, local security, network, bash shell scripting, apps, processes etc. I've learned so much from this course but I've finished it and now I want to learn more. What should I do now? I know there is still so much to learn, but I don't know where should I start. Are there any other (free) more advanced courses on Linux? I'd like to gain practical knowledge that can be useful in everyday use of Linux. By saying it I mean that I wouldn't rather learn about managing and setting up Linux servers as I do not have any servers in my home (and I do not need them). Moreover, I've heard that there is no reason to learn bash (except for the basics) because no one really uses it for serious programming today (a friend of mine who studies IT said so and recommended learning Python or Ruby). Basically, I just need someone to tell me what can I learn now. The world of IT is so huge that not being an IT specialist may result in losing somewhere in it. Any suggestions and ideas are welcomed.
DeMus

Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by DeMus »

When you really want a free Python course you could have a look here:
http://fullcirclemagazine.org/downloads/
Starting in issue 27 the course starts. Download them all and start programming.
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MartyMint
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by MartyMint »

miclis wrote:What should I do now?

You want to learn more about Linux...to what end?

Are you looking into a career where Linux knowledge would be beneficial? Are you interested in formal schooling in Computer Science?
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by richyrich »

A browse through here might give you some ideas on where to go next . . :)

https://www.unixmen.com/
English Invader
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by English Invader »

I don't think you should look at it in terms of becoming "an advanced user". I've never tried to learn things just for the sake of it - if I have a problem, I look for the solution; if I have something I want to do, I find out how to do it.

I recommend taking a step back and asking yourself what you want to use a computer for instead of burning yourself out trying to learn things you may never need to know.
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by Nic-Mint »

miclis wrote: I've heard that there is no reason to learn bash (except for the basics) because no one really uses it for serious programming today
bash is the system`s administrator language. If you do sysadmin stuff, you will need bash knowledge. But yes, it is not used for large programs.

Your question is a bit vague. What direction do you want to take in your career? Sysamin? Then learn scripting languages (bash, perl, python). Programmer? Then learn languages (Java, C, ...). Web developer? Then learn html, css, javascript and then some server side language (php, J2EE, ...).

The possibilities are endless. For the vast majority, Linux is a tool to further your other goals. If Linux itself is your goal, learn C, bash. Then look into some project or application you want to help on (some opensource project) and jump in that code. It will most likely use C, C++ or Java, with code in Git.

Then learn to use Eclipse and add to it the plugins you need for your project. Ex. syntax highlighting for the language you use, Git connection, ...

Good luck! Nic
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by jimallyn »

Here's one way you could learn a bunch: look here on the forums for posts about problems people are having. Pick one, and learn how to solve it.
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“If the government were coming for your TVs and cars, then you'd be upset. But, as it is, they're only coming for your sons.” - Daniel Berrigan
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by deepakdeshp »

A wealth of information here.

http://caverdan.com/LinuxLinks2016.html
If I have helped you solve a problem, please add [SOLVED] to your first post title, it helps other users looking for help, and keeps the forum clean.
Regards,
Deepak

I am using Mint 20 Cinnamon 64 bit with AMD A8/7410 processor . Memory 8GB
miclis
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by miclis »

Thank you for all your responses.
DeMus wrote:When you really want a free Python course you could have a look here:
http://fullcirclemagazine.org/downloads/
Starting in issue 27 the course starts. Download them all and start programming.
I'll see it, thanks. I had a short adventure with Python in the past. I was using code academy course then. But it is always good to have more sources of knowledge.
MartyMint wrote:
miclis wrote:What should I do now?
You want to learn more about Linux...to what end?

Are you looking into a career where Linux knowledge would be beneficial? Are you interested in formal schooling in Computer Science?
That's the question I've been asking myself. On the one hand I'd love to know everything about everything but on the other hand I know it makes no sense and it is always a better idea to choose a specialisation. Some time ago I was offered a job as a security engineer in a data security unit in one corporation. That surprised me, because I just said them (it was during open days in that company) that I have no education in IT but I have been using Linux for 2 years. It was a full time job so I could not accept it, because I still have like 6 months of studying before I graduate. But I think it might be a good idea to apply for this job after I finish my studies.
English Invader wrote:I don't think you should look at it in terms of becoming "an advanced user". I've never tried to learn things just for the sake of it - if I have a problem, I look for the solution; if I have something I want to do, I find out how to do it.

I recommend taking a step back and asking yourself what you want to use a computer for instead of burning yourself out trying to learn things you may never need to know.
This is something I do every time when I approach a problem. But fortunately I do not have so much problems so learning this way would be slow. I agree with you, there is no reason for learning things you would never use. I already have forgotten some things from this Linux Foundation course I just finished because I see no reason to learn them by heart (for example using vi, emacs or some terminal commands - I just don't need them in my everyday work).
Nic-Mint wrote: Your question is a bit vague. What direction do you want to take in your career? Sysamin? Then learn scripting languages (bash, perl, python). Programmer? Then learn languages (Java, C, ...). Web developer? Then learn html, css, javascript and then some server side language (php, J2EE, ...).
That's a nice hint, thanks for that. I'm afraid I wouldn't make a good programmer because my math skills suck. Being a sysadmin might be a better option but I do not exclude anything. Additionally, I do not know whether I would ever work as a IT specialist but still I think it would be nice to have some knowledge on this topic as more and more things in our lives depend on computers.

Once again, thank you all for your responses, links, and hints. I know that my topic and question aren't specific but at the moment I hardly can make it more precise. I'll consider everything you wrote here and I'll try to see all the sources you provided.
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by jimallyn »

miclis wrote:I'm afraid I wouldn't make a good programmer because my math skills suck.
The need of math skills depends on what you are programming.
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by shengchieh »

You're welcome to surf my website (signature).

I think the best way to learn the "underneath" working of linux is to install a geeky distro like
Arch or LFS (linux from scratch).

If you have two machines, use one w/ LM as your main computer and use one as your "education
toy" (w/ a geeky distro).

Sheng-Chieh
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by xenopeek »

jimallyn wrote:Here's one way you could learn a bunch: look here on the forums for posts about problems people are having. Pick one, and learn how to solve it.
This is the best advice. I learned more about Linux trying to help others here on the forums than I did through any other means.

Anyway, if you want something good to read go with the Debian Administrator's Handbook: https://debian-handbook.info/browse/jessie/. As through its Ubuntu package base Linux Mint is based on Debian and uses its package management system most parts of the book apply to Linux Mint. You can pick the chapters you think are interesting for you.
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by 0x2620 »

There is no lack of resources to learn about Linux, bash scripting, or other subjects (though I'll give you some anyways). What limits me personally is lack of motivation. If I don't have a direct, pressing need to solve a problem, I won't learn how to solve it.

I advise you to find a personal project which is near and dear to your heart, and figure out how to complete this project using the tools available to you in Linux.

But to learn what is available to you, you must learn about Linux. No Starch publishing has a number of good and affordable books on Linux (their books on Python are pretty good too).

https://www.nostarch.com/tlcl
http://linuxcommand.org/tlcl.php
^The Linux Command Line. Also available for free at the second link above. It's a slow and easy dip into bash scripting.

https://www.nostarch.com/howlinuxworks2
^How Linux Works. Kind of a dinner table book - something to peruse while eating breakfast. You might not need it, but it doesn't hurt to know more.

https://www.amazon.com/UNIX-Linux-Syste ... 0131480057
^UNIX and Linux System Administration Handbook. Not by No Starch, but read the reviews. If you finish this, you'll know more about Linux than most Linux users. You should probably read a book about networking (or at least network programming or software protocols) and an informational book about operating system design to get the most out of it. Knowing the basics of a programming language wouldn't hurt either.

I can't stress how important it is to find something that you really feel you must do. Being motivated makes everything easier.

I know a marijuana enthusiast who taught himself python so he could program a raspberry pi to automate his grow op (legal in my state, pls no bully mods). The same man couldn't be bothered to bathe daily or take out the trash more than once every two weeks spent a month of 12 hour days teaching himself python and some network programming to grow weed.
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by Pierre »

shengchieh wrote: If you have two machines, use one w/ LM as your main computer and use one as your "education
toy" (w/ a geeky distro).
Sheng-Chieh
something that I've always done - - is to have a "test machine" that you can play with.
- an older PC maybe, something that you nearly ditched, but decided to keep, as it "might be useful".
actually, I've got two "test machine" - - with different video cards in them.
but, each has similar operating systems installed.

that is - - PCs that you can deliberately destroy, in order to learn 'how to recover' from some disaster.
( win-10 is installed on this HDD, for this very reason )
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Please edit your original post title to include [SOLVED] - when your problem is solved!
and DO LOOK at those Unanswered Topics - - you may be able to answer some!.
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by 0x2620 »

miclis wrote:That's a nice hint, thanks for that. I'm afraid I wouldn't make a good programmer because my math skills suck. Being a sysadmin might be a better option but I do not exclude anything. Additionally, I do not know whether I would ever work as a IT specialist but still I think it would be nice to have some knowledge on this topic as more and more things in our lives depend on computers.

Once again, thank you all for your responses, links, and hints. I know that my topic and question aren't specific but at the moment I hardly can make it more precise. I'll consider everything you wrote here and I'll try to see all the sources you provided.
You don't need superb math skills to be a good programmer. Programming seems to require, at a minimum:
* High verbal IQ (do you enjoy reading and writing?),
* A very logical and rational mind, and
* Either an introspective personality or the sort of personality that derives pleasure from deep thought and solitude.

Knowing math helps, the more the better, but you can get by with college algebra, trig (both for the experience, which sharpens your mind,and for the exposure to things that are very similiar to what you will learn in some applications), and plenty of discrete math - which is more logic than math. A low-level statistics class wouldn't hurt either if you're allergic to calculus.

Math doesn't seem intuitive to me. As such I must spend a lot of time practicing math and taking notes, but in the end I always reduce it to a rote, mechanical process that I follow step-by-step to arrive at an answer. This doesn't work well in advanced maths, where you must step back and look at the big picture or know everything you've ever learned about math so you can find the right tool for the job.

Despite all this, I'm a good programmer and I do pretty good for myself.

Being extremely creative helps a lot, you can make logical leaps and figure out where something is going before you get there. Sometimes I wake up with solutions to my problems in my head, after doing the work of walking through them a few times the night before. I somehow visualize what the problem is in my mind, after which I can rotate it various ways and manipulate it to find a way through it.
Last edited by 0x2620 on Sat Feb 04, 2017 10:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by all41 »

miclis wrote: Any suggestions and ideas are welcomed.
Help me discover why Firejail no longer works with Palemoon-
(of coarse only a suggestion)
viewtopic.php?f=47&t=237385#p1264164

If you are able to formulate correct solutions to 25% of the issues that come up on this forum then you are definitely an advanced user. :wink: :)
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by Habitual »

Install FreeBSD.

You'll learn tons about Linux, or the appreciation of it? :D

Start a self-hosted wiki
Computer Security.
Virtualbox some new shiny technology, like docker

Meet-Ups, Mash Ups. "hackerspaces" (IDK what these 'are', some new fangled "lan-party"/InstallFest I suppose)
Fix more than you break.
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by mike44njdevils »

Conversations like this just reaffirm my decision to boot windows (see what I did there).
shengchieh wrote:I think the best way to learn the "underneath" working of linux is to install a geeky distro like
Arch or LFS (linux from scratch).
No love for Gentoo? (just don't watch Spatry's tut on it #scarredforlife)
Habitual wrote:Install FreeBSD.

You'll learn tons about Linux, or the appreciation of it? :D
Put disclaimers on your posts to NOT have a mouthful of coffee when reading them :)
jimallyn wrote:The need of math skills depends on what you are programming.
Programming is usually LOGIC based. Syntax/programming language is elementary; being able to organize it in a workable order is tantamount.
jimallyn wrote:Here's one way you could learn a bunch: look here on the forums for posts about problems people are having. Pick one, and learn how to solve it.
Here here. Frankly, just look at many of this gentleman's posts. Helping others learn linux will teach you more than any book.
"Those satisfactions are permanent..."
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by Portreve »

miclis wrote:Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?
Put this helmet on. It will help you to know and understand everything about GNU+Linux:

Image

Lenny, the guy pictured in the image above, is now a System Administrator, Network Admin, and can code in 26 different languages, all by donning this helmet. In fact, he can also play the violin, the harpsichord, a trumpet, and is a master chef in his spare time.
Please remember to mark your fixed problem [SOLVED].

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Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.
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Re: Becoming an advanced user of Linux - what to do next?

Post by Seano123 »

Hello Miclis and Good Luck on this Black Friday.

This may or may not be of interest to you, and you might have already learned how to customise a stardard .ISO file with your favourite distribution, in which case I apologise if I have set the bar too low for someone with two(2) years of Linux experience.

The reason that I found the knowledge of the process of creating a custom distro so extremely beneficial not long after I first moved to a Linux desktop on my client machine was that I inevitably like to tweak the standard distro as soon as it is installed, to add the software applications that I like which that distro does not have (eg. squashfs-tools, used for building custom .ISOs), remove all the extras that I never use (eg. LibreOffice), and then set my user config, menus, panel and even the desktop background just the way I like it.

After installing enough distros and then having to go through the process of installing and removing .DEB applications (apt-get), and then reconfigure my menus and panel, desktop themes and backgrounds, again and again, it seemed easier to create my own custom .ISO file, based on the distro I like the best (Mint 18.1 Mate currently), with everything I normally adjust already done on that .ISO, so that it can be on a USB stick for whenever I might need to reinstall my system, and the new installation boots up first time with all my customisations done already.

The process involves mounting an .ISO file, and copying the 'Live-CD' (or USB Stick) to an Output directory, with the exception of one file, /casper/filesystem.squashfs. We then use the command 'unsquashfs" from the squashfs-tools utilities to extract the complete system which runs when the Live system is booted into, into a Target directory, and then we 'chroot' into that target directory, and use a bash script to perform the apt-get install and apt-get remove operations, copy our preconfigured user config to the /etc/skel directory on the target, and then exit the chroot sesson, use 'squashfs' to squash the target system back into a filesystem.squashfs file, copy that to the /casper/ directory on the Output directory (gleaned from the standard .ISO), and then 'mkisofs' that Output directory to create our custom .ISO. The process usually takes me around 20 minutes using a pair of bash files, one for the main, and one for the chroot session inside that target directory system.

We then have a custom .ISO file which has all of our modifications already done, to make any reinstallation much faster and simpler.

This is a very concise explanation with vague details, but if such a customisation process is of any interest to you, then I would be happy to provide some better and more accurate examples of the bash commands and even the files which I have been using for seven (7) years, and there is quite a lot of information at places like the Ubuntu forum, and I presume here too. Let me know if you see any point in customising your distro.
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