13 Most Promising New Linux Distributions to Look Forward in 2019

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CoffeeFiend
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Re: 13 Most Promising New Linux Distributions to Look Forward in 2019

Post by CoffeeFiend » Tue Feb 19, 2019 1:50 pm

ajgringo619 wrote:
Mon Feb 18, 2019 7:33 pm
Can someone please explain why Mint is a beginner's distro???. Because is works? Sorry, but this moniker really bugs me. There is absolutely nothing I can't do on Mint that's blocked because it's for "beginners".

Been using Linux since RedHat 6.2 at the turn of the century, and Mint is far and away the most stable OS I've ever used.
That is a good question. I think perhaps it is referred to as a "beginner's" distro because of its ease of installation and use. And you have to admit, this forum is by far one of the friendliest and most helpful out there. That was very appealing to me as a beginner.
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Re: 13 Most Promising New Linux Distributions to Look Forward in 2019

Post by ajgringo619 » Tue Feb 19, 2019 9:21 pm

I can accept those reasons.
Mint 19.2 XFCE
kernel 4.15.0-70-generic
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Nvidia GeForce 960 w/2GB RAM (440.26)
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Re: 13 Most Promising New Linux Distributions to Look Forward in 2019

Post by philotux » Wed Feb 27, 2019 7:23 am

trytip wrote:
Tue Feb 19, 2019 10:24 am
out of all those i'd pick ArcoLinux but it's not really a distro so much as a one man's hobby
Could you elaborate a bit your thought on what counts as a distro and what not? Is the fact that Arcolinux is a fully functional OS not enough for it to be qualified as a disro? Most probably many distros out there have started as someone's hobby before gathering a group of devs around them. But maybe I am wrong about it.
ArcoLinux is a full-featured distribution that ships with the Xfce desktop (as well as Openbox and i3 window managers). ArcoLinuxD is a minimal distribution that includes scripts that enable power users to install any desktop and application. ArcoLinuxB is a project that gives users the power to build custom distributions, while also developing several community editions with pre-configured desktops, such as Awesome, bspwm, Budgie, Cinnamon, Deepin, GNOME, MATE and KDE Plasma.
https://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=arco

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Re: 13 Most Promising New Linux Distributions to Look Forward in 2019

Post by trytip » Wed Feb 27, 2019 9:57 am

philotux wrote:
Wed Feb 27, 2019 7:23 am
Could you elaborate a bit your thought on what counts as a distro and what not? Is the fact that
you want to know how i know it's a one man team? https://arcolinux.info/contact/

usually there will be a general email address other than contacting the main developer and a page about the team. i did not say anything wrong with that. i only meant a distro is a collaboration between a group of people bringing ideas together.
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Re: 13 Most Promising New Linux Distributions to Look Forward in 2019

Post by philotux » Wed Feb 27, 2019 10:40 am

trytip wrote:
Wed Feb 27, 2019 9:57 am
you want to know how i know it's a one man team? https://arcolinux.info/contact/
No, I just wanted to know why it would disqualify a full-featured OS to be a distro. To me it doesn't matter if it is developed by one or many as long as it is capable of doing no less than any other OS:es. Actually I think it is quite impressive that he is pulling it off all by himself. At the same time I do understand your point of having a dev team around a distro as well.
Anyhow, no one knows what the future holds. Arcolinux might gather momentum and attract some collaboration from other people.

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Re: 13 Most Promising New Linux Distributions to Look Forward in 2019

Post by bulevardi » Sat Mar 16, 2019 6:19 am

ajgringo619 wrote:
Mon Feb 18, 2019 7:33 pm
Can someone please explain why Mint is a beginner's distro???. Because is works? Sorry, but this moniker really bugs me. There is absolutely nothing I can't do on Mint that's blocked because it's for "beginners".
Of course because it works. You can still change a lot to the appearance, but at the end it just needs to work and be user friendly.
Beginner or expert, what does it matter if an OS is not working?

I tried different distro's before I came to Mint. And it works out of the box, easy installation, works with the software I need, not only for just office work but I created my whole creative studio on Mint, for graphic design and photography to recording audio works.
It's very versatile, and my wife can directly use it without explaining how to. Of course, as many operating systems, there are similarities in menus that look like Windows, but Mint made it better, faster, stable, good looking.

Years ago I was still using Windows (well, at work I'm still using it by obligation), but when I was hopping in linux distroland I came through all weird fancy flavours and themes and designs. Appearance, that's one thing, it's all nice... but it has to work too.
Beginner or Expert, it doesn't matter how it looks like, or how nerdy you can make it, it just has to work.

The green colours I love too... however, I'm not a big fan of the logo.... I always preferred the Open SUSE logo, as I've known that from my childhood already. But for some reason I never tried it, although the stuff I use my computer for will probably work as well as with Mint, the overal appearance of Open SUSE doesn't attract me, it's too office grey, and therefore, Mint is still the most appealing to me right now.

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Re: 13 Most Promising New Linux Distributions to Look Forward in 2019

Post by MrGrimm » Sat Mar 16, 2019 8:03 am

Pjotr wrote:
Sat Feb 16, 2019 3:07 pm
Nice, but not for me.... My distro-hopping days are over. :mrgreen:

After all, Linux distro's share more than they differ. Their upstream components are usually rather the same: Linux kernel, systemd, Grub, desktop environments, Firefox, Chromium, LibreOffice, Thunderbird...

They mostly only differ in the "glue" that holds those upstream components together, their particular mix of upstream stuff, their package management, tweaks and artwork.

For me what counts are these things: reliability, stability, fixed release (no rolling rollercoaster release, thank you very much), long term support, good quality control, rich official repo's, ease of use (yup, I'm lazy). All these together, more or less inevitably lead me to Mint or one of the *buntu's.
surprise, surprise gee i'm actually with Pjotr on this one. right now besides linux mint cinnamon the only other distro i'd give the time of day to is makululinux, specifically the lindoz distro.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGnqZ4O7f70

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Re: 13 Most Promising New Linux Distributions to Look Forward in 2019

Post by Portreve » Sat Mar 16, 2019 11:19 am

Pjotr wrote:
Sat Feb 16, 2019 3:07 pm
For me what counts are these things: reliability, stability, fixed release (no rolling rollercoaster release, thank you very much), long term support, good quality control, rich official repo's, ease of use (yup, I'm lazy). All these together, more or less inevitably lead me to Mint or one of the *buntu's.
Very well said, sir, and I concur. I view my computer as a "production environment" machine, and therefore whatever it runs of necessity and by definition must be solid, stable, reliable as a toaster, and of course must perform decently on the hardware which I am using.

My only niggles, to be honest, are that sometimes certain UI elements (dialog boxes are a good example) are not as well composed as they should be. This is where more or less any distro could take lessons from Classic Mac OS or Mac OS X.

Hoser Rob wrote:
Sun Feb 17, 2019 11:29 am
The last thing that tthe Linux world needs is more flaky new distros with very little user base and hence support.
And I can think of a particularly good reason to support your assertion: REPUTATION. The last thing the GNU+Linux community needs is the reputation of being an amateur-hour production.

rick gen wrote:
Mon Feb 18, 2019 8:34 am
"New" probably means someone in the basement finally found out how to assemble pieces together to make a distro,
added some personal touches in it and now wants to share it to the world and have his 15 minutes of fame.
That may be a bit harsh, but it's also not entirely untrue.

Pjotr wrote:
Mon Feb 18, 2019 9:01 am
Moem wrote:
Mon Feb 18, 2019 8:47 am
Pjotr wrote:
Sat Feb 16, 2019 3:07 pm
Nice, but not for me.... My distro-hopping days are over. :mrgreen:
I've never bothered with it. I landed on Mint on my first try, it serves me well, I'm here to stay.
Some people are born lucky. :lol:
Indeed they are, Pjotr. Indeed they are. Whether IRL or in the world of technology, that statement, sadly, holds true.

ajgringo619 wrote:
Mon Feb 18, 2019 7:33 pm
Can someone please explain why Mint is a beginner's distro???. Because is works? Sorry, but this moniker really bugs me. There is absolutely nothing I can't do on Mint that's blocked because it's for "beginners".

Been using Linux since RedHat 6.2 at the turn of the century, and Mint is far and away the most stable OS I've ever used.
Yeah, I'm bugged by that sentiment as well. All it does is lead the listener/reader to the wrong conclusion.

AZgl1500 wrote:
Tue Feb 19, 2019 8:42 am
I supported MScrapware for years.... when I retired, I was tired of the mess of baby sitting my PC....
I totally get where you're coming from, AZgl1500. I'm a recovering Mac OS/Mac OS X user myself.

Back in the days of Mac OS, it was a very rough-and-ready experience in the sense that it had none of the modern services of a UNIX-like OS or even a non-UNIX-like multi-tasking OS, but it was pleasant to use and it was very easy to troubleshoot. It was also at a time when much of the technology world was enthusiast driven. However, it's tended to be the case that all operating systems have become almost exponentially more complex, and therefore also significantly more complex to attempt proper technology enthusiast-like troubleshooting.

Fortunately for the GNU+Linux world, and to be fair Mac OS X as well, there's a lot going on "under the hood" which helps eliminate the manual troubleshooting and regular maintenance which was the hallmark of Mac OS, MS-DOS, and most other operating systems of the period.

I cut my teeth on technology in Mac OS. Having been exposed to the MULTIPLE other operating system choices of the era, there really was nothing quite like Mac OS. The only OSs which ever came close¹ to it were Apple ][gs OS and Amiga OS². When I was in high school, I was the only student who had ever touched a Mac, and was one of the very few throughout the whole of the school district. I was recruited to be on the school newspaper staff, and it's here that I started to learn about desktop publishing and developed my love of fonts. Thanks to my tech enthusiast nature and already-gathered knowledge and contacts, I got us set up with software to let us host files on one computer and remotely access them on the others (we eventually had two Mac SEs and one Mac IIcx in the class) and this became invaluable to our production workflow.

Well after high school, a friend of mine from there who was at the time living in Orlando exposed me to GNU+Linux, circa 1997 or so, and I had built a couple PCs by then and so he made me the installation CDs for RedHat 4.2.

It would be well over a decade before I seriously started playing around again with GNU+Linux, first with early versions of Ubuntu, then Fedora, then a few others, and eventually this led to my present status of being a free software advocate, and an advocate of libre file formats as well, and of course now using LinuxMint full time since ~2015.

trytip wrote:
Tue Feb 19, 2019 10:24 am
i see nothing special in the list. out of all those i'd pick ArcoLinux but it's not really a distro so much as a one man's hobby like makulu or archman but archman is very young and still many theme issues
It's like people boasting of their uptime stats. Uptime to me matters only really for servers or for systems specifically doing QA work for that given distro, so as to give everyone something of a measure of how stable it is.

────────────

¹ Each of these OSs had some outstanding features, such as earlier implementation of color, better multimedia capabilities, multitasking, etc.
² Amiga OS in particular, but the overall platform including hardware, had many technological superiorities to not just Mac OS but every other publicly-used OS out there, and with appropriate add-in cards was directly suited for video editing and multimedia content creation, the high water mark of which most likely was the TV show Babylon 5.
Presently rocking LinuxMint 19.2 Cinnamon.

Remember to mark your fixed problem [SOLVED].

Xi does look like Winnie the Pooh. FTCG.

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