Why do new people give up on Linux?

Chat about Linux in general
Unkn0wn
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Unkn0wn »

Let me start by saying I am a Linux N00B!

I would consider myself VERY knowledgeable in Windows but let's face it anyone can figure out how to /ipconfig release and /inconfig renew. The Command Prompt in Windows is a joke when compared to the Terminal in Linux. I started my Linux adventure a long time ago but I always fall back to Windows.

Here are a few reasons my computer will remain a Windows 7 and Linux mint 10 dual boot.

1. Driver support.

I have an Ati 5830 xfx version. After a few days of messing with fglrx and Ati CCC I finally got my resolution to 1920x1080. I can not start to describe the incredible amount of frustration I had just getting that to work. For whatever reason my Compiz doesn't work but I really stopped caring at least I fixed my resolution the way I like it.

2. Resolution @ 1920x1080

Is alright. For some reason the day/date/time thing moves away from the edge of the task-bar so its about half way to the middle of the screen. Very annoying!

3. Where's the pretty stuff?!?!

When Windows boots up it has flashy colours (stupid spell check) and just looks nice. If Linux has any hope in the future they need to make the boot more then 4 dots that go from green to black. There are tons of Graphics experts on here why not make a simple competition to make a better boot img. Also, when it boots up and I type my password in its looks very sharp. Very clean. However, boot up Windows 7. It looks sexy. Windows feels clean it feels right. Its easy for the casual user.

4. Simple tasks take ages to solve for the newbie users.

Linux is all like google this to make it work and run this command and this script it's just annoying. Where as Windows just plug n play maybe the most complicated thing is to update a driver maybe download a program and install it then your done.

5. I like programs like pidgin to work like windows.

Go to the tray not my task bar. I know there are ways I can make it do that but for the sake of Linux please steal ideas off Windows. This being a very good example. I don't want pidgin, Hulu, Chromium, Terminal, and god knows what else on my task-bar. Shove it into a really small icon in my tray. All the way to the right in where if I need it I can double click it and its there then minimize and go back to hiding.

6. Gaming.

No one can complain about what Linux is lacking unless they mention this. Sure I can use Wine and openGL but its crap. DirectX is amazing. Either make openGL amazing or lets get a dedicated team for DirectX. If there is already a group working on this I'm sorry if I left you out but make a twitter account or a website with updates so we all can eagerly anticipate DirectX on Linux! I know how complicated these things are and I understand the complications of getting a native Windows thing to Linux.But, I love to game! World of Warcraft works so I guess that will hold me over but I want to play some CoD, TF 2, Crysys, the list never stops.

7. N00b Friendly-ness.

I think having a noob friendly distro would greatly help. Make it look just like Windows 7 and have pop up how- to's. From how to update your system to basic terminal use. Its really not that complicated to make a pop up with text.

8. No programs.

Linux has quite the load of programs but if Linux could support .exe's with out Wine it would be complete domination. Could you imagine using photoshop natively on Linux?

In all I love the idea of Linux. Honestly I think that maybe not everything has to be open source because businesses would not make money. There will always be a free alternative that isn't as good but still gets it done. Once Linux gets a good fan base and could support closed source programs it will dominate. If Linux as a whole keeps forcing that open source approach with Wine as your only hope it's screwed.

I would love to see a Linux OS that minimizes the dependency of the terminal. Show users that Linux is what you make it. Dont force them to use the terminal and all that keep it simple for them and they will love it. Make it flashy and compiz default at max settings will make people fall in love with it. Maybe make wine automatically set up .exe's to work. Thats a good start for a noob OS.

That's about all I got for now. Again I am a Linux noob but please don't think I don't understand how complicated getting DirectX working on Linux would be. I understand that and can use Linux to an extent but not as good as I wish I could.


*** Please note that I have only read the first few comments in this post so I may repeat something already stated ***

Bazinga
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Bazinga »

It's really easy to get pidgin to go to tray if you glance at the preferences settings.
Image

randomizer
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by randomizer »

Unkn0wn wrote:I can not start to describe the incredible amount of frustration I had just getting that to work.
Nobody can really argue that AMD's driver support is... sub-par at best. :)
Unkn0wn wrote: For some reason the day/date/time thing moves away from the edge of the task-bar so its about half way to the middle of the screen.
I don't know why this has not been fixed. It's not a new bug. If you're running compiz it's possible to force it into the bottom right, although I can't remember off the top of my head how you do it as I haven't run GNOME for a while.
Unkn0wn wrote:If Linux has any hope in the future they need to make the boot more then 4 dots that go from green to black.
The boot splash will vary from distro to distro. It's not a Linux thing per se. Linux doesn't have boot splashes by default, it provides a verbose text output from everything that is initialising (this can be mostly deactivated by a simple kernel config option too, in which case you'd get almost nothing but a blank screen).
Unkn0wn wrote:4. Simple tasks take ages to solve for the newbie users.
I have to say that this is going to happen on every single OS in existence. I'm not tech support at work, but I am often in that role simply because I'm the most knowledgeable person in my department. Most of our sales team members can't even work MS Office properly, which is unfortunate because neither can I (I am a very basic user of office suites). :lol: I've had to fix a number of more technical problems too. The fact is that troubleshooting is an art and it must be learned. It doesn't matter if you're troubleshooting a mobile phone or a Cray XT5 supercomputer, you still need to have some knowledge about how it works or you're just stabbing in the dark (or using Google like is often suggested). Users can only use a computer. To be able to administer a computer requires stepping up to the next level.
Unkn0wn wrote:Go to the tray not my task bar. I know there are ways I can make it do that but for the sake of Linux please steal ideas off Windows.
I'm not really sure what it is that you're wanting here. I always have pidgin minimised to the notification area (or system tray, if you like). I'd never want my panel taken up by it. Pidgin in Ubuntu and Mint versions derived from Ubuntu all have this disabled by default though. Closing the buddy list will kill the application unless you set it in the preferences to always show the icon. I can't for the life of me understand why they've got it set up that way.
Unkn0wn wrote:Make it look just like Windows 7 and have pop up how- to's. From how to update your system to basic terminal use. Its really not that complicated to make a pop up with text.
While your second point has some weight, making it look like Windows 7 is simply not a good idea. Users need to know that they are not using Windows otherwise they will try and use it like Windows and run into problems. There are already distros that try to emulate the look and feel of Windows, some right down to mandatory activations and root user login by default (eek!). What benefit do users get from pretending to use another OS? If they were looking to get away from Windows then they shouldn't be trying to use one that tries to behave like Windows. After all, Windows is the only OS that is capable of correctly behaving like Windows. If they demand the feel of Windows, then switching to Linux isn't in their best interest.
Unkn0wn wrote:Linux has quite the load of programs but if Linux could support .exe's with out Wine it would be complete domination. Could you imagine using photoshop natively on Linux?
It's simply not possible to run a Windows executable without Wine. You can't make a Windows executable guess that it is on Linux, and then recompile itself to link to Linux libraries that may not even provide the same functionality. The only way to run photoshop correctly is to either have it compiled to use Linux libraries (and therefore will need to be rewritten to use a Linux widget toolkit like Qt or GTK+ among other things) or the Windows libraries need to be replicated (a la Wine). Linux software is built for Linux; Windows software is built for Windows. In the same way you can't expect to grab an OSX application and run it on Windows without issues.
Unkn0wn wrote:I would love to see a Linux OS that minimizes the dependency of the terminal.
Ubuntu has been slowly moving this way for years. Due to the open and highly flexible nature of Linux and its diverse userbase this is difficult to do. Much base functionality in Windows is provided by applications that are part of Windows. With Linux even the most basic functionality can be provided by interchangeable applications and building a GUI front end to all of them is impossible. GUIs are often highly inefficient as well, so it's often good to teach users to use the best tool for the job, not just the Windows tool for the job. To be honest, I don't see the point behind minimising dependency on the terminal. If squares looked prettier than circles, would we swap out round car wheels for square ones? Of course not, because round ones are more efficient for the job. Why not minimise dependency on the GUI instead? It's not inherently easier to use. However it is certainly better to use for some tasks. For example, viewing a photo gallery made of ASCII art in a terminal window is probably not going to be as practical as doing so with a GUI.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Unkn0wn »

randomizer wrote: The boot splash will vary from distro to distro. It's not a Linux thing per se. Linux doesn't have boot splashes by default, it provides a verbose text output from everything that is initialising (this can be mostly deactivated by a simple kernel config option too, in which case you'd get almost nothing but a blank screen).

I am aware that each distro has its own boot splash (to an extent). However, I was trying to bring more attention to the fact that Linux boot splashes (at least the ones I have seen) are very simple at best. While for my computer I only see it for like 3 seconds it hardly makes a difference. I was speaking for more of the "it has to look pretty" people not myself. I could careless about the splash however, not everyone feels the same way.

randomizer wrote: While your second point has some weight, making it look like Windows 7 is simply not a good idea. Users need to know that they are not using Windows otherwise they will try and use it like Windows and run into problems. There are already distros that try to emulate the look and feel of Windows, some right down to mandatory activations and root user login by default (eek!). What benefit do users get from pretending to use another OS? If they were looking to get away from Windows then they shouldn't be trying to use one that tries to behave like Windows. After all, Windows is the only OS that is capable of correctly behaving like Windows. If they demand the feel of Windows, then switching to Linux isn't in their best interest.
Allow me to clarify..

I meant to steal from Windows but improve it. I completely disagree with logging in as root. For the average user that is a terrible idea. My suggestions are not for all Linux users it was aimed more for getting people acquainted with Linux. I do agree with what you said, "Users need to know that they are not using Windows..." However, people that are moving over need to be able to relate to what they already know. It would then become an easier transition and less confusion. If this idealistic OS were to ever become something it would (in theory) just be a starter OS to get people interested into Linux. I LOVE the idea of an OS to start Linux noobs off with helpful tips and stuff like that.


randomizer wrote: Ubuntu has been slowly moving this way for years. Due to the open and highly flexible nature of Linux and its diverse userbase this is difficult to do. Much base functionality in Windows is provided by applications that are part of Windows. With Linux even the most basic functionality can be provided by interchangeable applications and building a GUI front end to all of them is impossible. GUIs are often highly inefficient as well, so it's often good to teach users to use the best tool for the job, not just the Windows tool for the job. To be honest, I don't see the point behind minimising dependency on the terminal. If squares looked prettier than circles, would we swap out round car wheels for square ones? Of course not, because round ones are more efficient for the job. Why not minimise dependency on the GUI instead? It's not inherently easier to use. However it is certainly better to use for some tasks. For example, viewing a photo gallery made of ASCII art in a terminal window is probably not going to be as practical as doing so with a GUI.

Again this was another suggestion for a noob version of Linux. I believe that if Linux as a whole wants the major market share it needs to be more user friendly while still being as open as it is. I would NEVER EVER EVER suggest getting rid of it because of how powerful it is. However, as much as I hate to say it, most computer users really don't care what they are running as long as they can do what they want as easily as they can. The Average user doesnt want to open a terminal to install something they dont want to learn how to us the CD command or Sudo or any of that. They just want to download something and install it. I think that idealistic Linux distro would be a "it is what you make it" kind of distro you could just settle for mediocrity or you could be in control of your system.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Unkn0wn »

Bazinga wrote:It's really easy to get pidgin to go to tray if you glance at the preferences settings.
I have already changed the settings but that was just an example. What about other programs?

randomizer
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by randomizer »

Unkn0wn wrote:I am aware that each distro has its own boot splash (to an extent). However, I was trying to bring more attention to the fact that Linux boot splashes (at least the ones I have seen) are very simple at best. While for my computer I only see it for like 3 seconds it hardly makes a difference. I was speaking for more of the "it has to look pretty" people not myself. I could careless about the splash however, not everyone feels the same way.
Fair enough, but I guess those people have forgotten that only a year ago they were using Windows Vista which had nothing more than a green bar (or worse, XP :shock: ).

Unkn0wn wrote:I meant to steal from Windows but improve it. I completely disagree with logging in as root. For the average user that is a terrible idea.
Yet, strangely enough, it's what many of these users want. You know how popular UAC is? Well imagine needing to enter a password! Heaven forbid I have basic system security! :P
Unkn0wn wrote:However, people that are moving over need to be able to relate to what they already know. It would then become an easier transition and less confusion.
OSX doesn't look like Windows yet it doesn't seem hard for people to pick up. I believe that in general if a user can't get used to something as superficial as a different interface then it's because they hate change too much (or just can't handle it), and will never be able to get used to differences in lower-level operation of the system. The GUI needs to be logically designed of course.

At least a CLI looks roughly the same everywhere you see one :)
Unkn0wn wrote:The Average user doesnt want to open a terminal to install something they dont want to learn how to us the CD command or Sudo or any of that.
Only because they've been convinced that this is the "wrong" way of doing things and that it shouldn't be like that because the GUI way is more modern. Many users would have used a CLI before, especially if they have been using computers for 15-20 years. Those who haven't will struggle more, obviously.
Unkn0wn wrote:They just want to download something and install it.
Well that's certainly something that needs to be knocked out of them. They'll never "get" package management if they keep trying that. Ever seen those threads titled something like "Help me install a .tar.gz file!"? Yea, that's what I'm talking about.
Unkn0wn wrote:I have already changed the settings but that was just an example. What about other programs?
You'll have to take that up with the developers. It's their decision how to do things.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by mikhou »

Why do new people give up on Linux?

I think for most people its just unfamiliarity. They are used to using Windows. So whenever they see a Linux OS, they don't know what to do and they end up going back to what they have already known. Most average users want to be able to boot up their system, surf the internet, and use email, and they don't necessarily want to have to learn anything new. So while (in my opinion) Linux is superior to Windows in almost every way, if they're no comfortable with it, then they're not going to switch away from what comes pre-installed on their computer.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by grey1960envoy »

@ Unkn0wn ; Make it look just like Windows 7. Look at Zorin , this distro looks too much like windoze ( you can make it look like either XP or 7) all that is missing to me is the BSOD :lol: :lol: :lol:
In a perfect world everything has it's place, Linux on my computer, windows on the wall, and M$ in the trash!
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Elisa »

randomizer wrote:
Unkn0wn wrote:I am aware that each distro has its own boot splash (to an extent). However, I was trying to bring more attention to the fact that Linux boot splashes (at least the ones I have seen) are very simple at best. While for my computer I only see it for like 3 seconds it hardly makes a difference. I was speaking for more of the "it has to look pretty" people not myself. I could careless about the splash however, not everyone feels the same way.
Fair enough, but I guess those people have forgotten that only a year ago they were using Windows Vista which had nothing more than a green bar (or worse, XP :shock: ).
Yep, that's why many skilled users changed their boring booting Win XP logo to custom funny/their favourites pics, like e.g. "This is Hacked XP, now u can be safe !" :lol: or their girls, pets pics etc. :D

Unkn0wn wrote:I meant to steal from Windows but improve it. I completely disagree with logging in as root. For the average user that is a terrible idea.
The last system by M$ I used was XP and I remember the policy of playing some games by the net - u mostly had to play them as root due some settings in those games, so there is no choice to play them like a user... :roll:
Unkn0wn wrote:However, people that are moving over need to be able to relate to what they already know. It would then become an easier transition and less confusion.
Yep, as grey1960envoy mentioned, Zorin OS will fit you, till you grow up from child linux pants and will come back to Linux MINT :D (with no offense but Zorin is like a Linux for windows-children in the kindergarten :) For everyday children I'd suggest the cool distro SkoleLinux/wwww.slx.no)
For a bit at least skilled Mint user is useless to move back to Zorin 'cos it's like you'd leave your high school moving back to study again an elementary school :roll: But for win$ users maybe it'd be the best step and distro which they could start with :)
randomizer wrote:
Unkn0wn wrote:The Average user doesnt want to open a terminal to install something they dont want to learn how to us the CD command or Sudo or any of that.
Only because they've been convinced that this is the "wrong" way of doing things and that it shouldn't be like that because the GUI way is more modern. Many users would have used a CLI before, especially if they have been using computers for 15-20 years. Those who haven't will struggle more, obviously.
Yep, agree. Imagine: you are new in a city. You r looking 4 how to get from point A to B. You r looking at the map or watching a more or less silly GPS navigator :)
But after some days, weeks living in the city and your walking around to get know your new home you will be able to get from A to B by a shorter traffic, drive which is not even in the map or even silly navigator doesn't know about it also :idea:
And this is the terminal :D A short and quick way how to do your tasks.
Unkn0wn wrote:They just want to download something and install it.
When you install Windows, except some silly programs you have absolutely nothing in it... :x
No wonder win users are hungry to get their OS ready to use.
And Linux? I do suppose at least 80% of all you have there with the net/firewall protection with many cool sw so in fact mostly you won't need anything else to download and install :D
Those 20% are some specific apps for special tasks for skilled users but everyday user won't need anything else (I've tested more distros so really most of them they have the most important stuff in the basic installation).
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by /Zoran\ »

Unkn0wn wrote:
Bazinga wrote:It's really easy to get pidgin to go to tray if you glance at the preferences settings.
I have already changed the settings but that was just an example. What about other programs?
In tray i can have my VLC player, audacious, emesene, dictionary, deluge (torrents), tucan (megaupload, rapidshare downloader)...of course network, sound...what else do you need there? :D

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by dagon »

Why do new people give up on Linux?
The first time I gave up on Linux was because I ran BLAG. I chosed it because it was the first distribution I found which wouldn't give me a long, more or less incomprehensible, list too chose from, but a simple downloadbutton on the frontpage. And it just installed brutally (there was an option to write blagblagblag at a prompt and it would just write over whatelse was there on the harddisk and the install would end with the cd coming out and the computer displaying a drawing of two little happy bears sharing a joint... and then the computer just worked... sort of).
It's an anarchist version of fedora so off course evil software was banned from it's universe. Like well working software for running such things like, for instance the printer we had in the community (I lived with 12 others in a big house and had installed LINUX on the community computer) so we couldn't use it. At least not like it was supposed to.
Anyway, only open software was allowed in BLAG. Well, as it turned out some of the software turned out to be not so open. The scripts and hacks that was used to manage blag itself... so when the guy in charge got tired, he pulled it off the web, leaving the rest of us hanging in mid-air. Linux literally gave up on me... and the rest of the people who used the computer wasn't impressed at all.

If you don't know computers it really doesn't matter what system you are using when it doesn't work.

Now I have a brand new computer and from the start ran Ubuntu and Windows7 in parallel. Both systems freezed from time to time (I've never experienced linux go down that bad untill Ubuntu 9.04 (I believe gnome was to blame...) and I was actually not that impressed with any of them. I know... I shouldn't have bought a new model, my bad...

The biggest problems I see would be the lack of manuals/instructions. And maybe that people tend to get in a defensive position about anything concerning their operative system... it makes communication a bit difficult.

I don't recomend linux to just anyone. I recomend it depending on peoples level of dedication and general curiosity... not their level of computer knowledge.
Linux takes a time to get used to and the culture behind it too but for me it has been a rewarding journey and I'm really curious about the future of open source, gnu, linux...

A happy gnu!

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by theyummyfood »

I think that the number one reason is that most software developers don't give a crap about Linux what so ever. I think that every thing Linux has to offer is FAR superior to Windows or Mac the fact that it's free, all of the distros so that any one is happy, all of the desktop environments, the amazing security, the customization tools, the list goes on and on. But there is just not enough software free or non-free. You may say just look at the soft ware manager it has 30,000 packages well my answer is thats not enough considering only like 1,000 or 2,000 I would even consider downloading. If software and hardware developers started to actually even consider all of us Linux users witch is a growing figure no one would give up on Linux.

:D free software rocks we need more of it :D
Mr. windows I'm so tired of your blue screen.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Lostwithaclue »

I can tell you why I gave up on Linux. A few years ago my son wanted me to try Ubuntu on an old laptop. I converted the laptop but I was going to school at the time and needed something with office on it, so I thought. I was under the impression if it is free it's not any good. I switched that laptop back to XP and my son eventually did the same. Eventually I bought a new computer, Toshiba Satellite Dual core processor with Vista, I loved it. After putting on a few Windows programs that I just had to have and the virus scanner always running my computer started slowing down. I started looking for an alternative and Ubuntu wasn't it. I started playing with a live dvd of Linux Mint 8 and was surprised. When 9 became available I downloaded it and dual booted for a while, after 6 months of not booting Vista I decided to wipe the computer and go with Linux Mint 9. Since wiping the hard drive I did install Windows through VM just so I can sync my iPod. The choice of programs has increased dramatically and I find them easier to learn and use then most windows programs.
Since I put Mint on my computer I got deployed to Iraq. I had one problem but that ended up being router related and not OS related. Since I've been gone my son has had to clean my wifes laptop twice (Windows 7) and the most dangerous place she goes is Facebook. When I get back she is getting Mint 10 installed on her computer. To ease her into the idea of Mint, I put Open Office on her computer and Chrome. The only program she uses that is MS is Money. It will be hard but I think I can change her mind on that.
I went home on a leave and installed Mint 10 on the laptop that I thought was dying, it's acting like a new computer again. My son built a new computer for gaming last month and ran out of money before he put Windows 7 on it. I told him to try Mint 10 to see if he likes it and to test out his computer. Now he is wondering if he should put Windows on it at all. He has one issue and that is he built the computer for gaming but the gaming industry does not support Linux as a rule. He is thinking about a dual boot with XP but says most of his "stuff" will be done in Mint.
For me Linux Mint has arrived at a point where it can give Window users a serious alternative.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by randomizer »

dagon wrote:The biggest problems I see would be the lack of manuals/instructions.
The amount of documentation really depends on the distro and the individual applications. Arch Linux, Debian and Gentoo have huge amounts of documentation, as does the entire GNU toolchain (read: manpages). Granted, it isn't usually written for newcomers, but the distros aren't targeted to those people anyway. Unfortunately the distros that most people are going to try, like Ubuntu, seriously lack useful documentation. Ubuntu used to have plenty of it, but the Ubuntu wikis are so outdated in many cases that you're better off adapting another distro's documentation.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by theyummyfood »

I really hope that some day the video game industry will start to support Linux.
Mr. windows I'm so tired of your blue screen.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by /Zoran\ »

theyummyfood wrote:I really hope that some day the video game industry will start to support Linux.
I really hope it doesn't, if you wanna hate me for it, go ahead...... :(

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Koninator »

No good hardware support, when i brought graphic card 9600GT i get with it program WinFox, for over clocking and fan control of Graphic card. Also i get iColl program with motherboard to control fan speeds, buss speeds,...

But in Linux i get nothing. I can control fan with nvclock but only for one time. If I restart PC it stops working, I don't know why. Then open nvidia drivers are bad and original nvidia drivers are complex to install.
Then there are always problem with Atheros drivers.

And there are no games, and wine is in pre experimental state. New games detect if they are run in virtual machine so they don't work.
Also now Oracle have brought Sun. This is death blow to open source community. Original developers of Open office left project. Some modules of MySQL are now available for purchase, Virtual box is developing in two ways - one way will be coon cut off probably. Ironically Google is last line of defense for JAVA - open source code - if JAVA falls, open source will follow.(little off topic)

Linux, especially Unix was build for mathematicians and computer engineers not for children or older people.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Elisa »

Koninator wrote:...Linux, especially Unix was build for mathematicians and computer engineers not for children or older people.
Mostly I agree except that line above :)
Fist of all - when you wanna play the latest games, forget Linux, however thankx PlayOnLinux GUI it's possible to play Warcraft, Red Alert, I am told that Counter Strike as well but u need a bit more RAM and CPU than u'd played it on Window$...
In generally, when you wanna buy new PC (case, laptop) or even any hw, it's useful first to have a look at the Linux hw database to get which hw is best supported in Linux.
If you choose the good hw you shouldn't have any hw/sw problems, IMHO. However, even for poor HW/PCs it's possible to run Linux or any BSD/unix for - e.g. firewall router/gate etc., which is not possible with any Window$ solutions :wink:
Linux/Unix is about freedom, Windows about slavery.

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randomizer
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by randomizer »

Koninator wrote:original nvidia drivers are complex to install
That depends on how you install them. If you use an Ubuntu derivative you can use jockey-gtk to install them, which is even simpler than it is on Windows. Simpler still is Arch Linux which has a package in repos for it (and an AUR PKGBUILD that will build modules for all kernels on the system). If you try to install them just by grabbing the .run then it's more complex, but basic command-line knowledge (and knowledge about how to kill X) will be sufficient to install it.

I agree that the nouveau drivers aren't much chop though. They don't even work well with rendering Google Image search pages. The pages almost hang.

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inktitan
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by inktitan »

randomizer wrote:
Koninator wrote:original nvidia drivers are complex to install
That depends on how you install them. If you use an Ubuntu derivative you can use jockey-gtk to install them, which is even simpler than it is on Windows. Simpler still is Arch Linux which has a package in repos for it (and an AUR PKGBUILD that will build modules for all kernels on the system). If you try to install them just by grabbing the .run then it's more complex, but basic command-line knowledge (and knowledge about how to kill X) will be sufficient to install it.

I agree that the nouveau drivers aren't much chop though. They don't even work well with rendering Google Image search pages. The pages almost hang.
And even more simple for all Debian based distro is sgfxi found at smxi.org. You have to run it outside of X (ctrl+alt+F1) then log in as root type sgfxi then Bob's your uncle. Of course if you can use jockey gtk you don't need this but its good for LMDE and Debian itself.
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