Why do new people give up on Linux?

Chat about Linux in general
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Nilla Wafer
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby Nilla Wafer » Mon May 26, 2014 3:57 pm

That's great, Barbados! Definitely go with the LTS release! Also, you'll want to check your hardware against this list! Mint's LTS is built on Ubuntu 12.04, so match your hardware to 12.04 for a quick double-check. This isn't 100% spot on, but it can help you identify trouble spots you might anticipate if your hardware isn't fully compatible.

This isn't Linux' fault... original equipment manufacturers are paid to be "Microsoft-compatible," and while many OEMs work with Linux, many do not. So a double-check is very useful!

Now as Linux distros go, it simply does not get any more "beginner friendly" on the desktop than Linux Mint! But since it may not be fully compatible with your hardware, it's sometimes worth looking around at a few others. A kid at school found PCLinuxOS for her computer - also very beginner friendly - and loves it! It doesn't run well on my computer, but it's great on hers. Mint doesn't run as well on her computer as it does on mine! Different hardware sometimes calls for different distros. The best ones have hardware compatibility pages on their web sites, like the one I referenced above for Ubuntu/Mint, and they can help you avoid some problems.

Please keep in touch and let us know how it goes for you! Even if you end up on a different Linux distro, your friends here would be really happy to hear that you found a Linux that works for you.

nilla

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby /dev/urandom » Sat May 31, 2014 7:22 am

Nilla Wafer wrote:A kid at school found PCLinuxOS for her computer - also very beginner friendly - and loves it!


I'm rather sure that that kid at school would go with some Mac OS X, customized Windows installation or GhostBSD very well too. :)

(I'm never sure if "a beginner loves it" is actually a Pro for the particular project.)
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Conni
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby Conni » Sat May 31, 2014 9:17 am

I followed Linux over the past 15 years. In 2000 I considered Linux as a niche product for programmers. But things have changed dramatically! Nowadays Linux is easy-to-use. For almost everything there are graphical tools. Actually for many Windows XP users it is easier to migrate to Linux Mint than to Windows 8.

There are basically two reasons for the popularity of Windows (the first reason applies to Mac_OS_X too!):

  • Users are buying it pre-installed on their computer. Buying an OS preinstalled is always easier than installing it, no matter how convenient the installer is. And the installers of major distributions are very convenient!
  • If you buy a new device (computer without OS, printer, scanner, mainboard, processor, etc. etc.), then you usually find a Windows Logo on the packaging combined with drivers (installation CD or download link.)
Isn't that convenience worth the price? I don't think so. There are substantial long-term drawbacks:

  • Security:You have to constantly keep your antivirus software up-to-date, and this software sometimes slows the computer down.
  • End of support (EOS): There are millions of users with quite old computers, which nevertheless are fully sufficient to fulfill their needs. After the EOS of Windows XP many of them are buying new computers, for instance because there is no Windows version, which can be run with 512 MB RAM. And even if their hardware is sufficient to run Windows 8 (or 7), buying Windows and installing it - which can also be tough! - is often not enough. Their beloved software from Windows XP often cannot be used anymore, at least not on the spot.
  • Additional costs: There is of course also freeware for Windows, but it is less secure. In the Linux World most software comes together with the source code. In the Windows world often you get only an .exe file, which can be malware. Therefore many people are buying commercial software.
  • Slavery: As long as you are not able to install an OS on your computer, you are a slave to the installed OS. Some people like slavery, but I don't :D .

Nilla Wafer wrote:Also, you'll want to check your hardware against this list! Mint's LTS is built on Ubuntu 12.04, so match your hardware to 12.04 for a quick double-check.

Generally before buying new hardware, let's say a computer named SuperPC 42-2014 :wink: you should take a look in Google, for instance search for:
  • SuperPC 42-2014 Linux
  • SuperPC 42-2014 Debian
  • SuperPC 42-2014 Mint
  • SuperPC 42-2014 Arch
  • SuperPC 42-2014 Ubuntu
That reduces the risk of suffering a surprise. If you are using Linux, flexibility can ease your life: Two months ago I bought a laptop. The laptop indeed has the status "pre-install Ubuntu 12.04". I wanted to install my pet OS LMDE, but before buying it I've read about serious problems. I found only one successful report in a Debian forum. There was no interesting competing product in my targeted price range, therefore I took the risk. I failed booting several systems (LMDE 201403, Mint 16, Ubuntu 12.04). I improvised and gave the beta version of Lubuntu 14.04 a try. It worked. It is simply a relatively new hardware, which needs a cutting-edge kernel in order to boot out of the box. Two months later I have the luxury problem of choosing between several great distros :D .
Desktop: Lenovo H515s, AMD A6-5200 , 6 GB RAM
Laptop: Lenovo Thinkpad Edge E145, AMD E1-2500, 4 GB RAM

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby whichonespink? » Thu Jun 05, 2014 9:52 am

i find it hard using linux mint 16, which i've been using for around 4-5 weeks now. its the first time having linux.

i do like it!
BUT
i am not computer savvy at all, and i believe linux must be easier for a newbie if they are more technically minded about computers, software,etc.
things like gnome, kernal, and others, may as well be double dutch to me. i've tried reading up on some of these words but my mind goes blank!
i'm never going to be interested in how things work regarding computers, i just don't have that interest.
programming, software, just doesn't register. i want to know all this but if a person doesn't have a genuine interest then its difficult forcing it.

at first i forgot about the software manager and all the great things there that can be installed, but now i look there first of course.
however i have downloaded a few things from the web and i'm yet to be able to install the things!
i get as far as extracting, but thats it. to me it seems incredibly hard and not straight forward to install these things.

the terminal looks daunting! i don't understand how people know what to type into it?
all that looks like you need to be very computer literate.
is there somewhere that shows all the various commands so people know what to type?
i keep seeing 'sudo' and i don't know what that is?

to me it seems that to complete some things the developers purposefully made sure that instead of doing one thing to do something, you have to end up doing multiple things for the same outcome. take the long route, so to speak.
i probably haven't explained it well enough?
actually i'm sure people didn't really do this on purpose, but that is what it seems like sometimes.
i know its not windows of course. but if someone is used to doing the same thing by clicking once on something, it does make linux seem difficult.

i'd love to be able to go somewhere that shows everything i've installed, but i can't find it anywhere.

i'd like to be able to REALLY uninstall something and not see it keep turning up over and over again. such as vuze for instance.

i'd like to be able to get rid of the grey colour that is so prevalent. my browser is grey but wasn't with windows.
the folders are all grey. software when opened is grey.
grey is a boring, cold colour imo.
i've download some themes but can't get to that final stage where i can apply them. it would be great to change things with just one click.
i know there are some themes available but they don't really change things very much, they are not very noticable and they don't change the colour scheme.
people make jokes about this and think its not important. well, it is to me!

in menu, the folder on the left hand side takes me to one that is full of stuff i haven't a clue about.
i know its just me but i like tidying up files and although i've moved these particular ones they just keep coming back.
so i'd love it if clicking in that file icon in the menu took me to a folder that contains all my music, pictures,photos, etc. like my documents in windows.

i created the cd for mint 17 the other day and by 'pure chance' it loaded on my pc. however none of my bookmarks and stuff was carried on to this up to date version of mint.
plus it started crashing after a while. so i chickened out and went back to 16!
what has happened a couple of times is that once its all booted up, the mint 16 i use appears to be 'new' and unused.
the welcome screen is there when it shouldn't be.
all my desktop icons are moved into different parts of the screen.
its like mint thinks this is the very first time i've seen mint on my screen and so i have to be taken thru' everything once again.

but i do like mint 16! it seems more relaxed in some ways if that makes any sense? even with all the problems i'm having.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby Barbados99 » Thu Jun 05, 2014 10:14 am

Nilla Wafer wrote:That's great, Barbados! Definitely go with the LTS release! Also, you'll want to check your hardware against this list! Mint's LTS is built on Ubuntu 12.04, so match your hardware to 12.04 for a quick double-check. This isn't 100% spot on, but it can help you identify trouble spots you might anticipate if your hardware isn't fully compatible.

This isn't Linux' fault... original equipment manufacturers are paid to be "Microsoft-compatible," and while many OEMs work with Linux, many do not. So a double-check is very useful!

Now as Linux distros go, it simply does not get any more "beginner friendly" on the desktop than Linux Mint! But since it may not be fully compatible with your hardware, it's sometimes worth looking around at a few others. A kid at school found PCLinuxOS for her computer - also very beginner friendly - and loves it! It doesn't run well on my computer, but it's great on hers. Mint doesn't run as well on her computer as it does on mine! Different hardware sometimes calls for different distros. The best ones have hardware compatibility pages on their web sites, like the one I referenced above for Ubuntu/Mint, and they can help you avoid some problems.

Please keep in touch and let us know how it goes for you! Even if you end up on a different Linux distro, your friends here would be really happy to hear that you found a Linux that works for you.

nilla


I almost gave up on Linux, but now I'm glad I didn't. After some pain and frustration initially, I am now 100% thrilled with Mint 17. It took me about two weeks of struggling to get everything working the way I wanted. In particular I had one Windows program i felt I needed in the Linux world in order to completely cut my ties to Windows. Finally, as of late last night, after two difficult weeks, I figured out how to get this program to run on Mint 17. It's a program for writers, authors called "Scrivener" and they now have a free software beta release that they provide for Linux users - if you can get it running on your particular distro. I had a rough time initially getting it to run on Mint 17, but finally had success. If anyone here needs help with this particular program on Mint, there is a user forum dedicated to helping Linux users get it running - here's the link:

https://www.literatureandlatte.com/foru ... m.php?f=33

And here's the post I just left them, thanking them for helping me get this software running on Mint 17:

This morning when I got up to do my morning work on my manuscript, I was able to use Scrivener again. This was the only program I truly needed to work, to be free of Windows. Now I have it working and I can't thank you enough.

Ha. I just finished my morning manuscript work with my beloved Scrivener......I'm vacationing on a small Caribbean island (Barbados) sitting on my porch overlooking the ocean....sipping my morning coffee, enjoying the ocean breeze. Life is good again :-)

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby Caldor » Sun Jul 06, 2014 2:17 pm

Here's another new Linux user that likely will give up on Linux soon. Like others before have said: I want my computer to work, I don't want to spend my day fixing broken things, reading tech forums and downloading (or apt-getting) obscure things that have no documentation or homepage a non-techie can read and understand. I want to like Linux, and I don't want to give Microsoft or Apple even more money as they already have. But that's likely what I will do soon.

Over the years I tried and tried - and probably installed various Linux distributions on perhaps 10 different hardware configurations, all of them running Windows XP with no problems. Result: not a single of these systems ran Linux without something going amiss. Since half a year or so I was running Linux Mint 16 with Cinnamon desktop and only the sound didn't work. I even considered that a good result: only one thing broken. By the way, that sound issue is also a good indication for what's going wrong with Linux. Here's the relevant thread: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+sour ... bug/217789 . Bug first reported on 15. April 2008. It's now more than 6 years later - bug still exists, status: Triaged - Incomplete.

And I fear that's something that's characteristic for Linux. Gazillions of distributions get made, hundreds of windows managers and the like. And bugs exist for years.

And a few days ago I downloaded Linux Mint 17, burned it onto a DVD, did a backup for my documents, wiped my harddisk, installed Mint 17. Result: Cinnamon freezes when scaling fonts, uses too much memory and eats my frame rate alive when I'm playing Wurm Online.

It's a sad state of affairs ...

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby monkeyboy » Sun Jul 06, 2014 3:59 pm

Caldor wrote:Here's another new Linux user that likely will give up on Linux soon.


I hear that, BSD might be something you may want to check as an alternative. Enjoy
If you don't like it, make something better
If you can't make something better, adapt
If you can't do either ball your panties up and cry.

Complaining is like masticating most anyone can do it.
However doing it in public is really hardcore.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby /dev/urandom » Mon Jul 07, 2014 3:38 am

Depends on the technical background. PC-BSD as the "BSD for beginners" probably suffers from similar issues. Still, when it comes to upstream bugs (given that "upstream" still means "maintained by the *BSD devs" here), OpenBSD is the only BSD that's known (to me) for regularly fixing even bugs made by other people, but then again, OpenBSD is not something you should set up without thoroughly having read the manual.

While I'd join you in recommending BSD as "something that's not payware", I'm not sure if Caldor would be happy with it.
(He might want to try FreeBSD first.)
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Users who misspell "Windows" as "Windoze" intentionally will be considered stupid.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby enxio27 » Sun Jul 13, 2014 12:56 pm

I gave up on Red Hat a number of years ago, for several reasons. First of all, although I didn't have a "bad" experience, there was too much software I needed to run that had no Linux equivalents. (Although it's not as much of an issue now, I will probably deal with that for the forseeable future, but it is what it is--that's why I have dual-boot.) Secondly, installing or configuring anything was such a pain. Although I'm perfectly comfortable with a command line or terminal (when I know what to put into it), and very willing to use it when need be, I simply don't have the time to be doing it all the time, as I was with Red Hat. Thirdly, hardware support was also an issue. My experiences with Linux Mint (two days in) have been very different so far, and I'm pleased. I don't anticipate giving up again.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby var » Mon Jul 14, 2014 4:22 am

Caldor wrote:Here's another new Linux user that likely will give up on Linux soon. Like others before have said: I want my computer to work, I don't want to spend my day fixing broken things, reading tech forums and downloading (or apt-getting) obscure things that have no documentation or homepage a non-techie can read and understand. I want to like Linux, and I don't want to give Microsoft or Apple even more money as they already have. But that's likely what I will do soon.

Over the years I tried and tried - and probably installed various Linux distributions on perhaps 10 different hardware configurations, all of them running Windows XP with no problems. Result: not a single of these systems ran Linux without something going amiss. Since half a year or so I was running Linux Mint 16 with Cinnamon desktop and only the sound didn't work. I even considered that a good result: only one thing broken. By the way, that sound issue is also a good indication for what's going wrong with Linux. Here's the relevant thread: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+sour ... bug/217789 . Bug first reported on 15. April 2008. It's now more than 6 years later - bug still exists, status: Triaged - Incomplete.

And I fear that's something that's characteristic for Linux. Gazillions of distributions get made, hundreds of windows managers and the like. And bugs exist for years.

And a few days ago I downloaded Linux Mint 17, burned it onto a DVD, did a backup for my documents, wiped my harddisk, installed Mint 17. Result: Cinnamon freezes when scaling fonts, uses too much memory and eats my frame rate alive when I'm playing Wurm Online.

It's a sad state of affairs ...


It's a sad state of affairs, for some users and their expectations of matching an OS developed by multi-billion dollar corporations who pay manufacturers to support their hardware versus a free OS supported by normal people.

You could ask for a refund :mrgreen: or use MATE instead of Cinnamon for your hardware, it will perform faster. What sound do you have? Most computers (laptops, netbooks and some towers) have some form of HD Audio that usually is detected and works out of the box or simply needs to be selected to work in the Control Center.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby noelbeth55 » Thu Jul 31, 2014 5:28 am

My story, i used ms for 20 years and after all that time you just get used to it. I tried Linux 3 times, 2008, 2011, 2012 now 2014. The biggest frightener with me on the first 3 ocassions was the terminal. I found it offputting. So 2 weeks ago i tried mint 17 cinnamon. Firstly my 2 printers connected themselves and i thought this is good. I was so enthralled in that that when it came time for me to use the terminal i just did it. No problems. So i am now over it, i have binned my 8.1 never to be used again. I would ask anyone trying linux not to give up, it is easier than windows and you are doing your bit for yourself. Now thats a good feeling.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby patrice4419 » Fri Aug 01, 2014 5:56 am

Yes, I also started Linux a few times - until Mint came along. Ubuntu was a definite turn-off. Ran Mint for a while in dual boot mode and then found out rather quickly I didn't really need Windows at all. Except for one program (a Dutch language ancestor prog) so someone told me about Wine. Now? Ditched Windows altogether.
The point of it all is this - Linux is not Windows and you should not expect it to be. However, have some patience, Rome was not built in a day either. You don't need the Terminal, not in the first instance but it is a very useful tool and certainly worthy of getting to grips with. You will I am sure at a later stage. Setting up your own firewall is easier with the Terminal and not difficult. There is so much help on the forums as well.
Never be afraid to learn something new. For all those of us who are paranoid about security and privacy, have a serious look at Linux. Even the Russki government seems to be going all Linux eyed. Is that saying something?
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The router (D-Link DS3580L) with USB slot.

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Is Linux a constant battle for everyone or just me?

Postby YoelT » Sat Aug 02, 2014 4:56 pm

I'm not ready to give up, but I am starting to find Linux frustrating still after 2 years in. It took me months to get my fresh install, on a computer I hand built to work the way I wanted. Being a Windows user for nearly two decades, you have to really relearn everything for every task.

How do I get multi-monitors to work? Months of research and tweaking, during which time, I wasn't actually using my computer for anything productive.
What software do I use to backup the way I want? More research and testing different software.
How do I sync the photos on my phone to my computer? More testing, and then you find an option (UbuntuOne) and then that service is discontinued and now I have do more work to find another solution.

It took me months just to get LM satisfactorily working for basic functionality like e-mail, internet, word processing, and syncing my cloud data. But I'm a photographer and primarily want to use the computer to be productive in this area. Processing photos, managing large files, and managing a website should be pretty simple right? Two years of Linux, and I have essentially spent most of my time that I would like to be using to be productive just wrestling with the computer.

My "workflow" goes something like this, for just about every new task that I want to do in linux:


    Turn on the computer to accomplish tasks ABC. Find the existing software I have won't do that.
    Go online to research new software for that.
    Find something that should work, attempt to install the software.
    Run into problem XYZ installing.
    Research problem XYZ.
    Test solutions that don't work.
    Find a working solution.
    Find there is another problem with QRS preventing me from using this solution.
    Research this new problem.
    Find a workaround on QRS.
    Fix the original problem XYZ .
    Successfully install the software.
    Attempt task ABC, but find that it is not how I expect.
    Research how to do ABC with the software.
    Discover a new problem EFG.
    Research problem EFG.
    Test solutions.
    Find a working solution, but realize there is another problem in HIJ.
    Research problem HIJ.
    Find a working solution.
    Fix EFG and HIJ.
    Attempt ABC again until success.
    Finally able to do ABC, works for a while.

Meanwhile, this takes days, weeks or months during which I am not getting anything productive done. :x

And thats not all! later I try to do ABC, but discover it's now broken.
Something was broken with an update, and now I have to run through XYZ, EFG HIJ and QRS all again to figure out what was broken and how to fix it.

Is my experience significantly different than anyone elses? Is this just how it is?
Should I switch to Debian? Are there less problems like this? I just want things to work.


I essentially spent the entire supported life of LM15 just trying to get it to work, and now I am no longer getting updates and have to start over with LM17??

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby noelbeth55 » Mon Aug 04, 2014 6:05 am

I do not understand why anyone has a problem with Linux. I think it is simply a matter of you either have it or you do not. I am a moderate pc user and linux has more than lived up to my expectations, sure you may have intermittent problems but sit with it and work it out. It really is straight forward. And if all else fails ask yourself how much did you pay for it. I rest my case.

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Re: Is Linux a constant battle for everyone or just me?

Postby niowluka » Mon Aug 04, 2014 6:52 am

YoelT wrote:Being a Windows user for nearly two decades, you have to really relearn everything for every task.

Yes, and pretty much all your issues are a result of that. I think that's the biggest reason people decide not to stick with Linux, is that it's too different and there is too much to learn and not everybody has time / will / patience / predisposition / etc to do that. I've been using Linux for 10 years and I still learn new stuff.

YoelT wrote:I just want things to work.

Then you will have to find another OS, Linux doesn't work like that.

Linux is not the only OS out there and everyone is free to make their choices.
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AW: Re: Is Linux a constant battle for everyone or just me?

Postby /dev/urandom » Mon Aug 04, 2014 6:56 am

noelbeth55 wrote:And if all else fails ask yourself how much did you pay for it.


No costs = no quality required? This might explain a lot.

YoelT wrote:Being a Windows user for nearly two decades, you have to really relearn everything for every task.


Why did you choose Linux?

If things should "just work", I guess Windows was a better choice at all.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby Previous1 » Mon Aug 04, 2014 10:12 am

But I'm a photographer and primarily want to use the computer to be productive in this area. Processing photos, managing large files, and managing a website should be pretty simple right?


Buy a Mac. Besides being the authority in that area, you still have the development strengths of a Unix platform (though I doubt you care), and they've recently cut prices on some of their models. Regardless, for 95% of people the initial price is far cheaper than the invested effort.
Last edited by Previous1 on Mon Aug 04, 2014 10:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Is Linux a constant battle for everyone or just me?

Postby BenTrabetere » Mon Aug 04, 2014 10:20 am

YoelT wrote:Being a Windows user for nearly two decades, you have to really relearn everything for every task.


I've been a Windows user for longer than that, and I really haven't had to relearn very much since I switched to Linux. Clicking an icon is clicking an icon, installing a program through Software Manager is similar to installing an app on a phone, entering a command at a prompt is....

That is not to say switching to Linux has not been effortless for me or that I haven't experienced a learning curve. The transition I faced when switching word processors (from WordStar to WordPerfect/DOS to WordPerfect/Win to Describe (OS/2) to Word) was more troublesome than switching from XP to Linux. (And that transition was smooth compared to my experiences with iTunes. Talk about relearning everything for every task!)

Neither the obstacles nor the learning curve has prevented me from being as productive under Linux as I was under Windows. I don't need to be an expert at something in order to use it.

YoelT wrote:It took me months just to get LM satisfactorily working for basic functionality like e-mail, internet, word processing, and syncing my cloud data.


I was able to get all of these basics simply by installing Linux Mint. The email client, browser and office suite I used under XP - Thunderbird, Firefox and Open Office - all installed at the same time as the OS. all have the same familiar Look & Feel.

The only after-installation chores were setting up email accounts and migrating contacts in Thunderbird. Anyone who needs assistance for that will need assistance regardless of OS or email client.

The only thing that did not work 'out of the box' was the Base component of Open Office – for some silly reason it is not included in the OO package. It has to be installed separately, which I managed to do without any assistance.


YoelT wrote:But I'm a photographer and primarily want to use the computer to be productive in this area. Processing photos, managing large files, and managing a website should be pretty simple right? Two years of Linux, and I have essentially spent most of my time that I would like to be using to be productive just wrestling with the computer.


I am an amateur photographer and PhotoShop CS2 is what I use to process images. I have puttered around with Linux alternatives like GIMP, DarkTable and XnView (which I actually like a lot), but I'm not switching. I've also tried PhaseOne, LightTable and Aperature ... and I'm still sticking with CS2. It meets my needs.

The only problem I had initially with Linux was installing CS2. The installation would fail at the validation stage because Adobe shut down the validation website a few years ago and the installation would not complete without validation. This is not a Linux/Wine issue; it is an Adobe issue, and there is a solution.

I have been pleasantly surprised that CS2 runs better for me under Linux/Wine than it does under XP, and I have not had to change my workflow.

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby InkKnife » Mon Aug 04, 2014 7:27 pm

I see a lot of Windows users in forums getting all tangled up because they will not adjust to installing via the software manager but instead choose to downloads debs and tarballs off websites and then they run into all the problems associated with a novice doing a manual install.
This is especially bad when they find some very cool sounding but old and unsupported piece of software floating around on web.
The big thing to get through to newbies is that, unlike Windows, on Linux directly downloading software off the web is the very worst way to get software instead of the only way like on Windows.
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Gowl
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Postby Gowl » Sat Nov 15, 2014 10:20 pm

Will for starters I am that new user trying out Linux. So new I don't have much intelligent to say. However that never stopped me in the past. :lol: The big feature that got me hooked was the fact I could run it from a jump drive. Wasn't long and I installed it on my laptop. Still learning. A little upset I can't run net flicks. :( But he whose name must never be spoken in my house likely got something do with that. :evil: Ya the guy responsible for "Vista" and "Windows Hate" That drove me to look into a Mac system BUT I didn't like how they controlled everything etc etc. Gods forbid should you want to build your own machine. :evil: So what is left for me??? Linux :D I might have to give up on Linux due to the lack of virus, Trojans, worms (except the ones you fish with) adware, crapware, malware, underwear....no wait, I'm not wareing any :oops: I don't know if I can handle the lack of stress and frustration. And it's free. No way! Is that someone at my door.? Oh no it's the Linux wack squad here to shake me down for a gazillion dollars.

But all the BS aside I can see where some give up. It's new and a bit scary and will have it's frustrating moments as well. I know windows and it's easier to go with what you already know. But for me when did I ever take the easy road. I got a lot to learn here.


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