Page 2 of 2

Re: Things to do after installing?

Posted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 10:32 am
by Pierre
- install gnome commander,, tux commander,, bs commander
( any one - a two pane file manager)

- install giver
( a file giver that worked over your local network)

- update the drivers for your usb 3g modem
( gets a better speed, & recognizes your modem better)

knock out level three software from within the Mint Updater
( less updates & those that aren't really necessary anyway)

- change the default wallpaper
( something more pretty)

- enjoy a virus free environment
:D :D :D

Re: Things to do after installing?

Posted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 6:07 pm
by patrice4419
Hmmm, nice question, however not all that helpful for somebody who seems to be a newbie? Nice chat about ufw firewall but not much what and how.
I would set up ufw first then gufw. But and it's a big but (not mine I hasten to add) gufw is not the easiest to set up. Using the Terminal inputs is faster and more accurate. Also bear in mind the sequence of the rules you are going to set up. It is not difficult, so:
#Enable the firewall and check whether it will start on boot as well
sudo ufw enable # I have assumed you have downloaded the program via Synaptic or Software Manager
# Set up the policy
Sudo ufw default deny
# Set up your udp ports needed (if wanted check what they do by googling port number)
sudo ufw allow out 53,137,138/udp
#Next set up ports out for tcp traffic
sudo ufw allow out 20,21,22,25,80,139,143,443,445,465/tcp
#If using a network printer use the line next or if not, comment out.
sudo ufw allow out proto tcp from port 9100 to 192.168.1.0/24 #assuming you use the 192 etc octets, port 9100 is mostly used for print tasks.
#allow CUPS - again assuming you have downloaded CUPS - if not it is available via Software Manager, just click to install.
sudo ufw allow CUPS
#close off everything else
sudo ufw deny out to any

#Try this first and if necessary and other ports are needed such as ssh then perhaps you ought to consider limiting this by inserting the following line
#sudo limit ssh/tcp (Insert this line after the line denoting port 22)I have commented the line so if you copy the lot it will not work until you uncomment it.

You should also check the logs - they can become rather large so consider using 'logrotate' - /etc/logrotate.conf or see 'man logrotate'.
The last thing I would advise newbies is do use a Firewall - ufw is quite good, works well. I know it is a frontend for iptables but that is not for newbbies unless they want a few cancelled holidays (like mine!).

You might also consider anti-virus - ah I can already hear the teeth gnashing of those who state bluntly Linux is super safe. Well, there is no such thing as super safe, trojans, malware abound. It is true though that Linux having a much lower userbase does not have a lot of trouble but as time goes on it might be a growing art. However - ClamAv is available and Comodo do a free prog as well. I use ClamAV at the moment. Yep I am paranoid.

Hasta la vista, amigo and welcome to Mint - yo've made the right choice.

Re: Things to do after installing?

Posted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 8:00 am
by austin.texas
patrice4419 wrote:#Try this first and if necessary and other ports are needed such as ssh then perhaps you ought to consider limiting this by inserting the following line
#sudo limit ssh/tcp (Insert this line after the line denoting port 22)I have commented the line so if you copy the lot it will not work until you uncomment it.
This indicates that you are talking about entering these commands in some file somewhere, but what file might that be?

Re: Things to do after installing?

Posted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 4:48 am
by patrice4419
I should have stated - ufw uses the Terminal. That's the program. Sorry should be more specific, typed all late at night and needed coffee. However, the ufw firewall commands are typed as superuser (or root).
UFW is a front-end for the iptables program that is installed with Mint 16. I use Mint 16 Petra with Mate desktop having gone through quite a few other distros. Mint 16 is based on Ubuntu which is helpful as you can use most of their instructions. Have a look at their forums.
I use UFW as I find it easier to input the commands I need for my set-up. iptables are a bit more complicated to type out.
For instance, sudo ufw allow ssh is easier than -A -p tcp -m --dport 22 -j ACCEPT.
If you have a lot of time and lots of pots of coffee, by all means dive into iptables properly.

A good description of UFW is given in UFW - framework by Jamie Strandboge of Canonical (Ubuntu developers). https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UncomplicatedFirewall
(Sorry, Mint aficionados).
You mentioned which program, so with UFW just use the Terminal, with iptables you can use scripts. User UFW input can be found at /lib/ufw/user.rules afterwards.

The one thing I am not quite certain of is what to do with ipv6 - I switched it off for now as ipv4 is still the main standard? Just wondering if I am a bit too quick in that assumption.

Pat.

Re: Things to do after installing?

Posted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 6:06 pm
by polarvortex
Ok I turned on gufw. But that's all I did was turn it on. Do I need to do anything with it, is it even doing anything?

Re: Things to do after installing?

Posted: Tue Jun 10, 2014 4:18 pm
by patrice4419
Been busy with Mint 17 and only saw your last post recently. Turned on gufw? That is just the front-end for UFW.
If you want to see the rules - 'sudo ufw status numbered ' (without the quotes of course).
Usually ufw (and gufw) will be started as soon as booting. Typing 'sudo ufw enable' will tell you.
Personally I don't use gufw, not necessary really.

Pat

Re: Things to do after installing?

Posted: Tue Jun 10, 2014 5:46 pm
by slipstick
If you want to backup to an external drive and copy the / partition as suggested above, you will want to make sure it is formatted as ext4 (will have been formatted FAT32 or NTFS if you have been using Windows) in order to preserve the metadata (file ownership and permissions, etc.). For more info on metadata in backups:
http://www.halfgaar.net/backing-up-unix

I have a WD"My Book" external USB drive which was formatted FAT32 for XP. When I installed Linux to dual boot, I split the external drive into two partitions, keeping a smaller one as FAT32 for Windows backup (I'll probably get rid of this one day) and making a larger partition formatted ext4 where I keep my Linux backups. Note - reformatting takes a long time - IIRC it took about and hour to reformat a 150 GB partition on my old P4 computer.

EDIT: Actually, I think it was shrinking the old FAT32 partition and moving the data that took an hour, not the actual reformat.

Re: Things to do after installing?

Posted: Tue Jun 10, 2014 6:55 pm
by austin.texas
slipstick wrote:If you want to backup to an external drive and copy the / partition as suggested above, you will want to make sure it is formatted as ext4 (will have been formatted FAT32 or NTFS if you have been using Windows) in order to preserve the metadata (file ownership and permissions, etc.).
That is true if you are copying with the file manager or rsync.
The method I mentioned was to copy with gparted and paste into unallocated space. In that case, there is no concern about the format.

Re: Things to do after installing?

Posted: Tue Jun 10, 2014 7:48 pm
by slipstick
austin.texas wrote: That is true if you are copying with the file manager or rsync.
The method I mentioned was to copy with gparted and paste into unallocated space. In that case, there is no concern about the format.
I didn't know you could paste into unallocated space without formatting first (I'm a newbie to Linux). So I assume that you delete that partition to return it to unallocated space before you make the next backup?

As for the backup of personal files using Grsync, it would need to be preformatted ext4, wouldn't it, as Grsync is a graphical front end to rsync?

Re: Things to do after installing?

Posted: Wed Jun 11, 2014 6:07 am
by austin.texas
slipstick wrote:I didn't know you could paste into unallocated space without formatting first (I'm a newbie to Linux). So I assume that you delete that partition to return it to unallocated space before you make the next backup?
Correct. To make the next backup you would delete the previous backup, leaving unallocated space, and copy and paste your / partition using gparted on the live Mint DVD (or Rescutux CD). Then change the UUID of the backup partition to avoid conflicts.
slipstick wrote:As for the backup of personal files using Grsync, it would need to be preformatted ext4, wouldn't it, as Grsync is a graphical front end to rsync?
I have never had any personal experience with using rsync or grsync to back up files from ext4 to NTFS or FAT. You can do it but you lose linux file attributes like permissions and some timestamps.
See here - http://askubuntu.com/questions/112863/r ... at-and-ext
Backing up ext4 to ext3 or ext2 is no problem.