SSD tips for new 17 install? Where get Xp theme?

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jimbob62
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SSD tips for new 17 install? Where get Xp theme?

Post by jimbob62 »

Guys
Total noob.(one day old)
New SSD...240 gb ...installed Mint 17.(off live cd)
i5 CPU, 8 Gb ram
All working.....firefox, internet......usb opening for pics etc...all fast.
Not asked for partition info during install.
Looked at ssd and no info shown about the parameters !(size volume info etc)
1. Which tools to use to make ssd run well ?
2. Which addon can i use to make the GUI look like Xp pro.
So much info out there.... feeling somewhat overwhelmed.
cheers
jim
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xenopeek
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Re: SSD tips for new 17 install? Where get Xp theme?

Post by xenopeek »

Welcome to Linux Mint. I edited your topic subject to be relevant to the help you are seeking.

Pertinent question is which edition of Linux Mint 17 did you install. Cinnamon or MATE? How to change looks differs between the two. Both are so called desktop environments, and that's basically the user interface to your operating system. You can theme both Cinnamon and MATE in various ways to make them look different. But you need to share which you installed.
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mr_raider
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Re: SSD tips for new 17 install? Where get Xp theme?

Post by mr_raider »

Do nothing. Modern SSDs run fine with default installs. Don't waste your time tweaking. If your SSD is not Intel or Samsung, run fstrim once in a while.
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kyrios
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Re: SSD tips for new 17 install? Where get Xp theme?

Post by kyrios »

As mr_raider said, modern SSDs run fine with the default installation so if you're just starting with linux, the best is probably to use the system as it is.
If you really want to tweak your system, my advise are : don't go too far: some tweaks you'll find on the net are for older SSD and some other tweaks may cause problems.

Most of the tweaks are done in the /etc/fstab file. If you're running the cinnamon edition, you can edit the file with this command :
gksudo gedit /etc/fstab

There you have to find the lines corresponding to the partition(s) on which you installed linux (usually "ext4" partitions) and you can add "noatime" if it's not already there.
This will significantly reduce disk writes whenever a file is read. Keep in mind these are just EXAMPLES that should be adapted to your system and note copy/pasted as it is !!!!

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 /dev/sda1
UUID=f0d9c48e-00c4-4225-ab21-1c5a42194bc8 /               ext4    noatime,errors=remount-ro 0       1
Some sites will also advise you to add the "discard" options for automatic/online TRIM, but personnaly I don't advise doing it because by default Linux Mint schedules weekly TRIM (which is enough), the discard option is not needed if your SSD has enough overprovisioning (spare space) or you leave (unpartitioned) free space on the SSD. Last but not least with on-disk-cryptography (like dm-crypt) the discard option has drawbacks with security/cryptography.

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 /dev/sda1
UUID=f0d9c48e-00c4-4225-ab21-1c5a42194bc8 /               ext4    discard,noatime,errors=remount-ro 0       1
Since you have enough memory, you can add the temp filesystem in a ramdisk (still in /etc/fstab)

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tmpfs        /tmp           tmpfs    defaults,noatime    0    0
tmpfs        /var/tmp       tmpfs    defaults,noatime    0    0
Some tutorials will also advise you to put filesystems like /var/spool or /var/log in tmpfs, do not do it. This is for advances users, it causes problems and the benefits are very low.

You can then edit /etc/sysctl.conf to tell your system to avoid the use of the swap area and prefer to use the memory modules instead.
with the command : gksudo gedit /etc/sysctl.conf
At the bottom of the file add

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vm.swappiness=10
If you use firefox, you ca do this :
◾ open about:config in the address bar
◾ set browser.cache.disk.enable to "false" (double click the line)
◾ verify that browser.cache.memory.enable is set to "true" (default value)
Main disadvantages of this method are that the content of currently browsed webpages is lost if browser crashes or after a reboot, and that the settings need to be configured for each user individually.

There are more advanced solutions to load the whole profile in memory for instance, but it's more complex to setup and does not work when the users encrypt their home directory...

I wouldn't do more than this.
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xenopeek
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Re: SSD tips for new 17 install? Where get Xp theme?

Post by xenopeek »

kyrios wrote:Since you have enough memory, you can add the temp filesystem in a ramdisk (still in /etc/fstab)

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tmpfs        /tmp           tmpfs    defaults,noatime    0    0
tmpfs        /var/tmp       tmpfs    defaults,noatime    0    0
Some tutorials will also advise you to put filesystems like /var/spool or /var/log in tmpfs, do not do it. This is for advances users, it causes problems and the benefits are very low.
Don't make anything in /var a tmpfs. As /var is specified to survive reboots, programs may depend on /var being on persistent storage--if you tamper with that you may impact performance in a bad way (as files need to be recreated each boot) or limit functionality (no history). Not really worth it IMO, as modern SSDs have a life expectancy of at least a decade. And that's with writing ten gigabytes of data every day for more than decade.
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Dupo
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Re: SSD tips for new 17 install? Where get Xp theme?

Post by Dupo »

Hi,

i'm also interested for informations about SSD on Mint 17.

Is there a command line who can tell us if Trim is activated by default ?
How can we see that Trim is activated by default for the Intel or Samsung SSD ?

Must we use gparted for create partitions before install Mint 17 Cinnamon or Mate version, or must we use the installation tool of Mint only ?

Have you got an idea about the size of the partitions to create for a SSD and/or a HDD (primary or secondary) ?

If the SSD have no free space (unpartitioned), must we use fstrim ?

Thanks for your replies.

Note: Is there a tutorial who explain how to install Mint 17 on a SSD ?
jimbob62
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Re: SSD tips for new 17 install? Where get Xp theme?

Post by jimbob62 »

Thanks guys.
SSD is crucial.
Mint 17 Quina cinnamon 64.
When i visit sites...they dont specifically mention 17...and refer to other kernals...etc.
so this is confusing.
Have looked on 'How To'...on you tube......which just confuses as most vids are so poorly made and assume you are a expert already by missing steps.
Can anyone point me specifically to the correct download for xp GUI......and correct download for virtualbox so that i can use my old XP apps for a while.
cheers
jim
mr_raider
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Re: SSD tips for new 17 install? Where get Xp theme?

Post by mr_raider »

Dupo wrote:Hi,

i'm also interested for informations about SSD on Mint 17.

Is there a command line who can tell us if Trim is activated by default ?
How can we see that Trim is activated by default for the Intel or Samsung SSD ?
Issue the command

sudo fstrim -v /


If the output states that you trimmed something, your drive supports TRIM

You can check the file /etc/cron.weekly/fstrim to see if the script was created. You can add the flag --no-model-check for non Intel/Samsung drives
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kyrios
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Re: SSD tips for new 17 install? Where get Xp theme?

Post by kyrios »

xenopeek wrote:Don't make anything in /var a tmpfs. As /var is specified to survive reboots, programs may depend on /var being on persistent storage--if you tamper with that you may impact performance in a bad way (as files need to be recreated each boot) or limit functionality (no history). Not really worth it IMO, as modern SSDs have a life expectancy of at least a decade. And that's with writing ten gigabytes of data every day for more than decade.
It doesn't make anything in /var a tmpfs, it only makes anything under /var/tmp a tmpfs. I don't agree with you when you say it might impact performances in a bad way: even if a few files have to be recreated, RAM is so fast that it won't have any noticable impact and the few milliseconds lost will be balanced by a few milliseconds won won by the creation of other temporary files because even if a SSD is fast, RAM is still faster. /var/tmp is a semi-persistant filesystem, it might be deleted any reboot so applications cannot assume their temporary files will survive a reboot. That's why doing this cannot be harmful. Does it worth doing it? Honestly I am not convinced it does but still it reduce de I/O on the disk so if people want optimisations, it is a possible optimisation.

Regarding /tmp, personally I always put it on a tmpfs on systems (used as desktop computers) with more than 4Gb RAM regardless if the system uses a classical HDD or a SSD because in my humble opinion, this improves the reactivity on the system.

One more optimisation I forgot for SSD that could be interesting is to set the I/O Scheduler on "deadline" or eventually on "noop". By default it's usually on "cfq" which is good from classical HDD but not for SSD.

You can check the value with ([value between brackets] is used by default)

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$ cat /sys/block/sda/queue/scheduler
If you use GRUB, you can change it the following way :

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$ sudo gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst
The kopt line gives the default parameters to boot Linux with. Mine looks like this:

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# kopt=root=UUID=6722605f-677c-4d22-b9ea-e1fb0c7470ee ro
Don’t uncomment this line. Just add any extra parameters you would like. To change the I/O scheduler, use the elevator option:

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elevator=deadline
Append that to the end of the kopt line. Save and close menu.lst. Then you need to run update-grub to apply your change to the whole menu:

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$ sudo update-grub
If you don't use GRUB (like me), the easiest is to do in the rc.local

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$ sudo gedit /etc/rc.local
Add at the end of the file (before exit 0)

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echo deadline > /sys/block/sda/queue/scheduler
echo 1 > /sys/block/sda/queue/iosched/fifo_batch
Will be effective at the next reboot.
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Ginsu543
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Re: SSD tips for new 17 install? Where get Xp theme?

Post by Ginsu543 »

You can also change the scheduler to deadline by editing the /etc/default/grub file to change:

From this line:

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GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash"
To this line:

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GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="elevator=deadline quiet splash"
Save, and then run sudo update-grub in Terminal. You should be good to go after reboot.
Main: Intel Core i7 920 D0 @ 4.0 GHz | Asus P6X58D Premium | 12 GB Mushkin Redline PC3-12800 7-8-7-24 | EVGA GeForce GTX 560 Ti | Mint 17.2 Cinnamon 64 / OS X 10.7.3
Portables: Toshiba Portege R200 | Mint 17.2 Cinnamon 32 / Dell Mini 9 | OS X 10.6.7
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