"Fresh" upgrade, usually fairly problem-free? [SOLVED]

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Barbados99
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"Fresh" upgrade, usually fairly problem-free? [SOLVED]

Post by Barbados99 »

I'm very happy with Mint 17 Cinnamon and I've installed a lot of programs and I'm using them (I don't have Windows anymore). I want to keep up with the new releases as they come out. I read this about how a "Fresh" upgrade is the best way to upgrade to new releases. It says it's "safe, fast, reliable and easy" but I thought I'd ask here about how reliable it is. Is it pretty painless, or is it common for stuff to go wrong?

http://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial/view/2

I would follow the 5 steps described in that link:

1. Make a backup of the data
2. Make a backup of the software selection
3. Perform a fresh installation using the liveCD of the new release
4. Restore the data
5. Restore the software selection
Last edited by Barbados99 on Thu Sep 18, 2014 11:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
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kurok
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Re: "Fresh" upgrade - is this usually fairly problem-free?

Post by kurok »

http://blog.linuxmint.com/ Mint isnt going to be going with a new base for every release of 17, this link will explain in more detail. Sorry that wasnt the link i was looking for. What i'm trying to say is it is going to use is the 14.04 base for the whole series of 17. You wont have to do an upgrade like the one your talking about until 2019.
To answer your question i tried it once and totally borked my system. Many people have done it without any problems, mint seems to handle it better than ubuntu.
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Pierre
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Re: "Fresh" upgrade - is this usually fairly problem-free?

Post by Pierre »

" Is it pretty painless, or is it common for stuff to go wrong?"

you should always check the new version works, using the live_disc,
that your hardware & other stuff, still works.

Eg: on a recent PC install, didn't check the AC97 audio card. ..
:) it's a NoGo :(
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kyphi
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Re: "Fresh" upgrade - is this usually fairly problem-free?

Post by kyphi »

Yes, Linux Mint 17 is a joy to use. Welcome.

Linux Mint 17 is supported until 2019 so you will not have to concern yourself with upgrading for a while. That will give you plenty of time to feel at home with your new operating system and to learn some of its intricacies.

You will be able to perform tasks that you have been forbidden to perform in Windows with greatly more powerful tools.

It is a good idea, if you can spare the time, to read the posts on the Linux Mint forum i.e. the questions and answers.

When Linux MInt 17.1 is released, there is no need to upgrade because the Update Manager will have already offered you the updates to 17.1 and you will have installed them.

Making a backup is good practice. Back up to a drive other than the one that houses your operating system so that, in the event of a total catastrophe, your backed up data is safe and can be restored to a fresh install.

Backing up your software selection is less important than backing up your home directory. Some software you may no longer need in days to come and some may be outdated or rendered obsolete by new and more capable programs. Software is easy enough to re-install. What you cannot re-install is what is in your home directory, your personal files, emails, music, videos, documents, etc.

Some users, when doing a fresh install, opt to create extra partitions so that the operating system is on a partition separate from the home partition. The advantage is that, if the operating system has to be re-installed, the home partition is left intact. You have plenty of time to learn how to do that.

Linux Mint is "safe, fast, reliable and easy" but you do have to learn how to use it.
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Barbados99
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Re: "Fresh" upgrade - is this usually fairly problem-free?

Post by Barbados99 »

kyphi wrote:
When Linux MInt 17.1 is released, there is no need to upgrade because the Update Manager will have already offered you the updates to 17.1 and you will have installed them.
I didn't realize this. I now understand that the next 3 upgrade releases will be 17.1, 17.2 and 17.3 will all remain on Ubuntu 14.04. So as long as I keep my system up to date with Update Manager, I'm automatically going to be running the next 3 releases as they become available? That's pretty cool.
My homemade daily-driver:
Mint 20 XFCE - Mint 20 LMDE4 Cinnamon - EndeavourOS XFCE - EndeavourOS i3
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1TB NVMe SSD - 32GB DDR4 - and a lot of old parts from the scrap pile
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