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Shortcuts for NTFS Drives

Posted: Sun Aug 02, 2015 3:30 pm
by perdomot
Hi,
Just installed LM 17.2 onto my C drive in a dual boot configuration. I have my music and pics on a different hard drive formatted with NTFS and am trying to create a shortcut in the home directory for my pics and music folders so I don't have to copy over all the files. I've searched around for the procedure using Terminal but I get broken links and a message the the Picture already exists. I'm trying to use Picasa for pics and it can't see the other drive. Can anyone advise me what I'm doing wrong? Thanks.

Re: Shortcuts for NTFS Drives

Posted: Sun Aug 02, 2015 9:21 pm
by Mark Phelps
You can't install a Linux distro to your C: drive unless you used Mint4Win -- which you did not mention.

So, my guess is that what you REALLY did was install Mint to its own partition, right?

As to mounting NTFS drives -- NOT a good idea, if the drive is the same one containing the OS. This can very easily result in filesystem corruption of the NTFS drive, rendering Windows unbootable and thus, very hard to repair.

A better solution is to create a shared DATA partition (one without an OS), move the files to that partition, and share that.

Re: Shortcuts for NTFS Drives

Posted: Sun Aug 02, 2015 10:27 pm
by perdomot
When I ran the installer, it allowed me to dual boot with Win 7 on my SSD. I can see my NTFS hard drives and access them without a problem but Picasa doesn't let me add them when searching for pics. Doesn't even see them so I thought if I create a shortcut in the Pictures folder in the home directory, Picasa could add the pics. Using GThumbs for pics but prefer the way Picasa works and shows pics.

I was able to make a shortcut in the home directory between 2 folders there by following advice on videos but when I try to make a shortcut of a folder that's on the NTFS drive in one of the home directory folders, I get broken shortcuts. Can't figure out why.

Re: Shortcuts for NTFS Drives

Posted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 12:03 am
by z31fanatic
Mark Phelps wrote: A better solution is to create a shared DATA partition (one without an OS), move the files to that partition, and share that.
This is the best thing to do. I have a Dell Latitude which lets you install a second hard drive. I formatted the second hard drive to FAT32 and put all my music, pictures, and videos on it.
That way I can use them in Mint and Windows and read and write from both.

Re: Shortcuts for NTFS Drives

Posted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 12:12 pm
by renzor
Why is mounting C:/ bad? When I installed my comp C:\ was shown and clicking on it mounted it I think. I can access C:\ freely through Mint. Is this bad?

Re: Shortcuts for NTFS Drives

Posted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 12:43 pm
by perdomot
So the problem is that the partition I have the music/pics is in NTFS and if I create a FAT32 partition and copy the stuff there, the shortcut technique will work?

Re: Shortcuts for NTFS Drives

Posted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 12:51 pm
by altair4
perdomot wrote:Hi,
Just installed LM 17.2 onto my C drive in a dual boot configuration. I have my music and pics on a different hard drive formatted with NTFS and am trying to create a shortcut in the home directory for my pics and music folders so I don't have to copy over all the files.
Please post the output of the following commands:

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sudo blkid -c /dev/null

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cat /etc/fstab
And based on your first post you don't need a fat32 partition.

Re: Shortcuts for NTFS Drives

Posted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 7:29 pm
by Flemur
I made a link to a directory on an NTFS partition like this:

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ln -s /mnt/NTFS/warez warez
Then

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cd warez 
takes me to the NTFS partition ('warez' directory). Or you could add it as a 'bookmark' (whatever it's called) in your file browser.

The partition's entry in /etc/fstab is

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LABEL=NTFS    /mnt/NTFS    ntfs-3g noauto,user,windows_names  0 0
Notes:
- you have to give it a LABEL to mount this way; or you can mount by UUID or /dev/whatever.
- 'noauto' means it's not mounted at boot time; remove that to mount it at boot.
- I created the /mnt/NTFS directory first:

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sudo mkdir /mnt/NTFS
sudo chown username:username /mnt/NTFS

Re: Shortcuts for NTFS Drives

Posted: Tue Aug 04, 2015 6:05 pm
by Mark Phelps
renzor wrote:Why is mounting C:/ bad? When I installed my comp C:\ was shown and clicking on it mounted it I think. I can access C:\ freely through Mint. Is this bad?
Because if you mount the "C" partition read-write (which is the default) and make any changes to it, you risk corrupting the Windows filesystem in the process, preventing Windows from rebooting, and (thus) making it VERY hard to fix!

Re: Shortcuts for NTFS Drives

Posted: Wed Aug 05, 2015 3:35 am
by renzor
Mark Phelps wrote:
renzor wrote:Why is mounting C:/ bad? When I installed my comp C:\ was shown and clicking on it mounted it I think. I can access C:\ freely through Mint. Is this bad?
Because if you mount the "C" partition read-write (which is the default) and make any changes to it, you risk corrupting the Windows filesystem in the process, preventing Windows from rebooting, and (thus) making it VERY hard to fix!
What should I do instead if I want to access files and write to them on C:\?

Re: Shortcuts for NTFS Drives

Posted: Wed Aug 05, 2015 12:20 pm
by Flemur
What should I do instead if I want to access files and write to them on C:\?
Create another NTFS partition (w/windows), which windows will call D: or some such, access & write your files there instead of C:. (Note: they won't be called C: or D: under linux).

Re: Shortcuts for NTFS Drives

Posted: Wed Aug 05, 2015 9:31 pm
by renzor
Flemur wrote:
What should I do instead if I want to access files and write to them on C:\?
Create another NTFS partition (w/windows), which windows will call D: or some such, access & write your files there instead of C:. (Note: they won't be called C: or D: under linux).
Could you please link me to a tutorial/page which is the right way to do so? I wouldn't want to look at the wrong one and mess up my current windows installation