How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

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Be_classy
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How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby Be_classy » Thu Apr 13, 2017 2:26 am

As we know US senate passed this law that our personal information that our ISP has, That's why I am tensed or conscious with my online privacy so Is there any way I can maintain my online privacy?

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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby Moem » Thu Apr 13, 2017 3:27 am

Use a VPN. There are many recent threads on the subject, so there should be plenty of information available and easy to find.
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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby 1.618 » Thu Apr 13, 2017 6:05 am

Use a vpn, ultimately though you can't hide yourself online and it's not just your ISP you have to worry about. some vpn will keep logs some won't, websites collect data that can link back to your specific machine, a lot of traffic gets redirected through prism and gchq, mass packet collection and decryption, then there's all the hacks into your system so they can watch you, your ISP is the least of your worries really.

It won't be long before vpn are required by law to keep logs just like your isp.

If you want to hide online, buy a new laptop for cash, harden it off and jack someone elses connection EVERY time you go online :)

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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby Mute Ant » Thu Apr 13, 2017 10:31 am

The TAILS distribution writing to an encrypted persistence partition would leave no copies about who you are (TAILS-is-TAILS-is-TAILS) or where you went (TAILS uses TOR) or what you looked at (LUKS is 'robust'). There's the minor inconvenience of needing to boot from a removable drive, but that's the default for a technical, privacy reason.
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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby chrisuk » Thu Apr 13, 2017 11:13 am

Be_classy wrote:As we know US senate passed this law that our personal information that our ISP has, That's why I am tensed or conscious with my online privacy so Is there any way I can maintain my online privacy?


(*I'm not trying to be a troll, or hijack this thread, but maybe my post will stimulate discussion and get more info than the OP would otherwise have received.)

This is a layman's answer; I have no evidence to back anything I'm going to type... I'm neither a security consultant or a Cryptographer.

I think the honest answer to your question in the thread title, is; "you can't".

A VPN is more private than no VPN, but how does anyone actually know their communication is private? You can't see the other end of the tunnel - how can you prove it's private? Ask in forums? Does anyone in those forums actually know? Or are they repeating what they've read online? What about Tor? Who runs the exit nodes? What can be seen there, and by which organisations?

I think it's like most things - we think we're safe until some Whistleblower tells us we've not been safe for years. In years to come, I bet someone reveals that our encrypted communications were never really encrypted at all ;)
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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby killer de bug » Thu Apr 13, 2017 11:20 am

You can also use TOR. It helps in protecting your private life, but only if you take some dedicated steps. If you log in your email account with your full name using TOR, there is just no point in using TOR.
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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby killer de bug » Thu Apr 13, 2017 11:26 am

chrisuk wrote:A VPN is more private than no VPN, but how does anyone actually know their communication is private?

At least, the VPN IP is what most website will see and they won't really know where you are. If someone like your ISP is reading your traffic, it will only see encrypted data. This is already a step forward.

chrisuk wrote: What about Tor? Who runs the exit nodes? What can be seen there, and by which organisations?

The exit node is a concern and that's the reason you should always connect with HTTPS websites. So that the traffic is encrypted and the exit node can't monitor it. Additionally, if you use the standard TOR settings, with 3 relays, the entry and exit nodes can't easily know about each others. Even if some methods exist. Riffle will make this process much harder. The more TOR traffic in your area, the more protection you get.
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Today is National Get a VPN Day

Postby Pierre » Thu Apr 13, 2017 11:39 am

at least in Australia - - it is:
http://www.itwire.com/security/77680-to ... n-day.html
"Marking the deadline for telecommunications and Internet service providers to comply with the Commonwealth Government's telecommunications metadata retention requirements, EFA and other online rights organisations have declared today to be ‘National Get a VPN Day’.".

wherein some service providers have struggled to meet the deadline. .. ..

so - it's not just the folks in the USA - that have an issue.
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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby killer de bug » Thu Apr 13, 2017 11:47 am

Oh yeah I have seen this news in the last days and I have been thinking about you. :wink:
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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby phd21 » Thu Apr 13, 2017 2:52 pm

Hi "Be_classy", and Anyone Else Interested in this,

I just read your post and some of the good and interesting replies to it. Here are my thoughts on this as well.

It would help to know more about your system setup. If you run "inxi -Fxzd" from the console terminal prompt, highlight the results, copy and paste them back here, that should provide enough information.

There are a few very good ways to protect your online privacy, and here are some suggestions:

1.) When you setup your Linux Mint system do not use your real name in the user name and or computer name, use something non-descriptive, no personal information. This can be changed afterwards as well.

2.) I believe everyone should immediately change their local ISP (Internet Service Provider) network connection's DNS Server IP addresses to neutral secure DNS server IP addresses from a free (or paid for) DNS provider like, "Opennic project", "dns.watch", "openDNS", "freenom world", etc... You can go to the websites of the DNS providers for information on why this should be done. This can be setup either in your hardware router setup, or easily through your Linux Mint system's Network Manager icon in the system tray panel for each computer. If you choose to sign up with a DNS provider, which is not required by most of these except by some, then do not use your real name.

3.) VPN (Virtual Private Network): In addition to changing your local ISP DSN server IP addresses, it is highly recommended that everyone use a VPN provider's service for encrypted anonymous Internet use. There are many VPN providers and VPN options available from "system wide" VPN providers like the excellent, low cost, "Private Internet Access (PIA)", etc... (System Wide VPN = best option). There are also some free system wide VPN providers like "vpnbook" and "vpngate", etc... these work, but these do have some restrictions and or limitations. And there are Internet browser add-ons (plug-ins, extensions) like the really nice "Hoxx" or "DotVPN" VPN add-ons; the Opera browser has one built-in. Almost all, if not all, VPN providers do not record personal identification information, or browser activity, and most do not keep records for more than 1-2 weeks anyway, some even less or not at all. You can and should check the VPN providers details on this before using any of them. There are those that recommend using a VPN provider whose business headquarters is not in the same country that you are in.

Again, if you choose a paid for VPN provider and are super security conscience (paranoid?), then sign up without using your real name and use a pre-paid debit or credit card or some other secure means of payment that will not identify who you are.

Tip1: For the super security conscience paranoid people, you can even "double up" on VPN's by using a "system wide" VPN provider and then using a browser VPN add-on on top of that, and or use a VPN proxy webpage. Or you can use the Tor browser or the "Tails" like Linux systems. FYI: Some of the Tor servers were compromised, and I am not sure if that has been resolved or not, it probably has. The one problem I have with Tor is that users cannot choose which world wide Tor servers the Tor browser will use, and it usually changes every couple hours or so, which means you could end up using a Tor server in a country using a language you may not understand, and all your searches will reflect that as well. With VPN's, you can choose which VPN servers in which countries that you want to use.

Tip2: You can use "www.ipleak.net" to test your DNS IP address changes, and your connections to VPN's to see that your primary external IP address changed, and make sure your browsers are not leaking "webRTC", see bottom of "www.ipleak.net", or install a webRTC add-on. I would highly recommend that you go to "ipleak.net" before making any changes to see what your current default ISP connection information is, like your default external IP address and DNS server IP addresses, so that when you make changes to your DNS server IP addresses and or connect to a VPN, then you can tell that these IP addresses are different as they should be.


4.) All the Internet browsers have many add-ons, extensions, and plug-ins for helping anyone surf the Internet in a safer more secure way. Here are some of my recommendations.

Example: Firefox security and privacy add-ons
https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/extensions/privacy-security/?sort=popular

"ublock origin" for an ad blocker (Opera has one built-in), privacy protector plus, Disconnect, HTTPS everywhere, stop fingerprinting (not sure how well this works yet), "privacy settings" (for advanced users only), "Privacy Badger", etc... Keep in mind that some add-ons may slow down or negatively affect your browsing with certain websites (which can be turned off or on or whitelisted for certain websites), so you may have to experiment. These do not seem to have any negative effects on my system and in fact make browsing faster. Some might be redundant and unnecessary, like having "ublock origin" and "Privacy badger" (not totally sure, others might know); I have not installed and tested this Privacy Badger yet.

Note: Most online websites make their money (revenue) from ads on their websites, so using ad blockers does not help them, even though it does make their webpages load faster. If you really like a website, then consider "unblocking" (allowing) their ads, either all the time, or even if only once in awhile; you can easily control whether an adblocker (ublock origin, etc...) allows or blocks a website's ads by clicking the adblocker's icon in your browser.


5.) Your use of any Internet browser (procedural): If you are using online banking, or payment services to pay for whatever products and or services (utilities, E-Bay, Amazon, etc...), using your bank accounts, credit cards, debits cards, Paypal, Bitcoin, etc... you might seriously consider using a private window or private tab when doing those activities.

Do not ever download or open attachments (including images) from anyone or any website that you do not know well.

6.) Install and use the wonderful sandboxing application "Firejail" for all your Internet enabled applications.


Hope this helps ...
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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby mariad_10 » Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:18 am

Moem wrote:Use a VPN. There are many recent threads on the subject, so there should be plenty of information available and easy to find.


I second this, the Simple answer is to use a reliable VPN service. If you do, your ISP can only see your encrypted traffic to some IP address. Although they can know a lot of other things that range of transmitted virtual servers, yes they cannot track the entire traffic data.

Another issue often happens because of IP leaking from VPN servers side your VPN connection reconnects, now your traffic start transmitting directly from the real IP then your ISP can track your IP. That's why I recommend to USE authentic and reliable connection of VPN otherwise it will end up with a waste of money and time.

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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby lmintnewb2 » Tue Oct 31, 2017 7:23 am

Honestly really don't think someone can, well at least not without inconvenience that would make computer usage tedious. There's too much and too many aspects to it, too many parties involved. Many of which are better skilled, thus xyz-enduser is highly unlikely to be able to outmatch them.

Relying on unknown service providers and software. Basically amounting to blind trust. Who they are, how they operate or were designed. The enduser really has no way of knowing. So think the guy who said, pay cash, use an access point to go online that's not tied to you, even then someone would have to be really careful and conscious of what they're doing, lest the setup get tied to them anyway. Sign-in to google or yahoo or whoever elses services as your user and then proceed to go on the super secret net journey. :D

VPN ... one thing I've always found somewhat amusing. Privacy obsessed users, sign up for VPN ( again and esp if it's a free provider ( which has to be generating some type of revenue) through a party they really know nothing about.) Ok whew, I'm good now, but overlook things like dns leaks. So the name resolutions to the websites they visit are still being resolved by their ISP, ISP still has no problem logging they're online travels. Have seen VPN fanatics inquiring about switching to Google's public dns servers too.

Stuff like this and check out this is kinda fun. Ironically .. the more steps someone takes in this situation to give themselves anonymity, the more unique they could be making their device/browser finger-print. While am sure there are ways to limit or even spoof the information a system is providing. Personally don't want to have to spend 1,000hrs config'ing and learning about all the aspects involved.

People use/rely on software like adobe flashplayer or one provided by Google Inc < which yeah they're known for world class privacy protection. :) Thus flash and supercookies etc and so forth. It goes on and on, infinite measure and counter-measures. For vast majority to cover completely innocent and normal web activities, nobody really cares about.

Implementing some practical safeguards to at least filter out some of the parties which may be collecting packets and monitoring web-traffic ok. Using stuff like https everywhere, a reasonably reputable VPN(anonymous proxy server .. whichever), blocking 3rd party cookies in the browser etc etc seems reasonable enough. Though trying to compete with some of the major players in this, govt(s), Google ... others in terms of skill and resources is logically almost certainly a waste of time.

Think for a good majority of the people undertaking this to the extreme, they board up the door but leave 5 windows and the backdoor unlocked and have no clue of it. Personally consider the internet almost like being in public, the information super highway. You can tint the windows, change the plates, borrow a friends car, take random routes to/from work and utilize anti-tail counter-measure, put on a disguise and wear shades but end of the day, if there's a police drone 2000yds away tracking you, it's going to see everywhere you're going.

Much less if there's a dang digital swarm of the suckers, logging and tracking. Which basically no doubt is the case. Also end of the day, not doing anything that I need to hide. If I had to, would employ as many counter-measures for the needed period of time to stay untraceable to best of abilities. All that's potentially involved just isn't practical for comfortable everyday avg computer use.

Another funny analogy I like to use in this, which I believe is fairly accurate. I could read everything I could can get hands on about basketball, workout constantly to improve speed and fitness, dribbling feverishly 24/7, sleep with the ball tucked under my arm and then when I step on the court with Micheal Jordan, he'd smash me without breaking a sweat despite every effort.

If implementing endless tech-privacy measures makes someone feel better and happier then hey, have at it.

lmintnewb2

Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby lmintnewb2 » Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:06 am

Pointless thought on this cont:

When come across people obsessed with online privacy also can't help but wondering what are they doing online that they feel such a compulsion to need to go through all of this ? Vast majority, am guessing nothing they need to cover-up.

Not saying don't go ahead and apply reasonable measures if it makes someone feel better or achieves a practical purpose but if it goes to the extreme, where people are losing sleep, dumping tons of time or in whichever way having a noticeable adverse impact on (performance or enjoyment of) their tech-experience, then Houstan they have a problem.

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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby Hoser Rob » Tue Oct 31, 2017 1:18 pm

I don't think it's 100% possible to hide your activities from your ISPn either. And Tor is already quite hacked and has been for some time.

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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby MintBean » Tue Oct 31, 2017 1:40 pm

If TPTB want to know what's on your machine and it's connected to the internet, they can access it.

They can get hold of ISP logs.
They have back doors into just about any form of encryption, and public encryption length is limited such that with these engineered weaknesses they can crack it.
They likely have back doors engineered into your OS and certain applications.
Your CPU runs a second OS (management engine) under the one you can see giving full access.

They have infinitely deep pockets to employ the best and brightest.

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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby lmintnewb2 » Tue Oct 31, 2017 2:58 pm

Never even bothered with TOR, knew it'd been long since compromised and just assumed it likely already was long before it even went public. Recent article said the group Anonymous hacked into it, which supposedly they said 1/2 of the stored content they copied was kiddie p0rn. Don't know if that's true or not, just what the article said .. they'd said. FBI dropped a kid-p0rn case they had going so they wouldn't have to make their TOR hack public during the legal proceedings.

Also would be curious to ask TOR users is and by how much the browsing experience degraded using it ? Have gotten curious a couple times and almost went ahead and set it up just never enough to follow through on it. Shrugs. After posting that link on dns leaks above, later noticed they got a link high up in that which covers additional considerations for VPN users too.

Oops, one more observation, again ironically, using TOR and whatever other extreme measures to avoid tracking or ensure your privacy also logically enough to me ... believe makes it more likely that person is going to attract the attention of some of the heavy-weights watching over the interwebz. Thus encouraging them to pay closer attention to them and utilize whatever available resources to track them or hack the persons comp(s) etc. The ole ... hmmm, what are you trying to hide and why all these evasive measures if you're not doing anything ? Type of situation.

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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby NChewie » Tue Oct 31, 2017 3:39 pm

There is a very different attitude to privacy in the EU (bar the UK) and the US.

The EU17 want to enshrine privacy into Member State law, with heavy penalties for organisations that fail to protect data adequately.
Take a look at this:
https://www.gdpr.associates/data-breach-penalties/

There will be two levels of fines based on the GDPR. The first is up to €10 million or 2% of the company’s global annual turnover of the previous financial year, whichever is higher. The second is up to €20 million or 4% of the company’s global annual turnover of the previous financial year, whichever is higher.
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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby lmintnewb2 » Tue Oct 31, 2017 4:15 pm

^ The way governments work on paper and how they actually work are always two totally different things. Pretty much the same for what politicians say and what they actually ever do or mean are nothing alike. Add onto that matters of international jurisdiction + for people with tons of money and the law firms that go with it. ie: Google Inc 20+ billion per year, M$ 90+ billion/yr. Buys A LOT of influence and friends in high places too.

If a UK citizen voluntarily visits and uses a service offered by a Corp based out of another country, depending upon circumstances, does xyz-govt even have jurisdiction or grounds for legal action ? Am not an international law specialist, better than layman educated in terms of legal proceedings in my native country, not so much outside it. How many people ever actually read end-user agreements or similar, something pops up that says I agree ( you can use whatever service you're trying to use) or I decline ( and can't use it) ? Click I accept and get on with life would be vast majority I think. Read the user agreement for window$ 10 for example. :) They could have a clause in it that says, when you die we have legal right to harvest all your organs and a good % wouldn't notice it.

The "law" is a murky, convoluted mess and maze, full of jargon and often glaring contradictions. So I'd say Google Inc and it's lawyers will have little or no difficulty legally harvesting as much data as they please and as for govt's watching the citizens of foreign countries pretty much the same. Because they probably already have reciprocal agreements with other govt's pertaining to the matter. Plus always the option of plausible deniability, set up a front or hire a 3rd party and let them do the dirty work, if such hired and not officially associated party were to resort to non-legal means to accrue data or engage in other less than legal activities, the employer can always say, nope I wasn't aware of what they were doing, nor did I ever instruct them to or would ever encourage them to break any laws. This is a real shame gosh darn it !

One last pointless observation, there's an old saying, it's not illegal ... as long as you don't get caught. Oops actually it's, it's only illegal IF you get caught. :D

Nope more stupe babble about this, as I was thinking it over as for Google Inc, their main interest in data collection is behavioral marketing or better targeted ad placement, if they know what xyz-user and machine at IP address X likes, prefers ... is interested in, then they can show tailored ads to them and thusly likely increase chances of a $ale. Same time though, data they collect and guessing they know enough of the law and/or loopholes so that it's pretty much legal ... is theirs to do with as they please. With the full rights of ownership ... that being something you own legally, you almost certainly can legally sell or resell it. Which certainly extends to data collected.

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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby NChewie » Tue Oct 31, 2017 4:58 pm

lmintnewb2 wrote:^
If a UK citizen voluntarily visits and uses a service offered by a Corp based out of another country, depending upon circumstances, does xyz-govt even have jurisdiction or grounds for legal action ? ...



Well... Member States of the EU can cooperate, and do through bodies such as the Article 29 Working Group (soon to be replaced by the European Data Protection Board under the GDPR). Here is an example... the Irish Data Protection Commissioner (DPC) has announced today in relation to a public letter to WhatsApp from the Art 29 Working Group:
The DPC is also pleased that WhatsApp and Facebook Ireland have re-confirmed that the current data sharing suspension will continue during this ongoing engagement with the DPC, specifically related to data sharing for use by Facebook Ireland to present products and ads. This specific data sharing will not be activated for EU-based WhatsApp users until WhatsApp confirms the mechanism to enable this specific data sharing with the DPC.

So... action in one Member State has put data sharing on hold to protect all EU-based WhatsApp users.
https://www.dataprotection.ie/docs/EN/31-10-2017-Commissioners-statement-on-Art-29-Working-Party-letter-to-WhatsApp-/m/1675.htm

Such cooperation is under threat from Brexit of course :cry:
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Re: How can I hide my online activities from my ISP?

Postby lmintnewb2 » Tue Oct 31, 2017 5:21 pm

Ok this is hilarious, as many things funny, even funnier cause it's true. :D

Excerpt which had me lmao. :D
“One of the terms stipulated that the user must give up their firstborn child or most beloved pet in exchange for WiFi use. In the short time the T&C page was active, six people agreed to the outlandish clause.


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